Appendix F
Biosketches of Committee and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

William H. Campbell, Co-Chair, is vice president, Advanced Network Systems, BAE Systems, Inc. He joined BAE Systems in 2002 and established the Information and Communication Networks Business Area, which he led as vice president and general manager until 2007. In that capacity he provided systems-level solutions for warfighters. Prior to joining BAE Systems, he was the University of California’s chief information officer (CIO) and associate vice president, information resources and communications. He served in the office of the president of the university system with responsibility extending through ten campuses, five medical centers, and three national laboratories. His duties included implementing the university’s New Business Architecture, overseeing the Digital California Project, and serving on the board guiding the deployment of Internet-2 in California. Mr. Campbell retired from the Army at the rank of Lieutenant General. His 38-year career as a soldier culminated with duty as the Army’s director of information systems for command, control, communications and computers (G6); as CIO for the U.S. Army; and as a military deputy to the Army acquisition executive. During his military career, he held operations and military intelligence positions, including command from company through brigade. As a general officer, he held positions in information management, research and development, and systems acquisition, including 10 years in program executive officer jobs. He represented the U.S. Army on NATO R&D committees, led the campaign to improve computer security, initiated a biometric identification



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 134
Appendix F Biosketches of Committee and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS William H. Campbell, Co-Chair, is vice president, Advanced Network Systems, BAE Systems, Inc. He joined BAE Systems in 2002 and estab - lished the Information and Communication Networks Business Area, which he led as vice president and general manager until 2007. In that capacity he provided systems-level solutions for warfighters. Prior to joining BAE Systems, he was the University of California’s chief informa - tion officer (CIO) and associate vice president, information resources and communications. He served in the office of the president of the university system with responsibility extending through ten campuses, five medical centers, and three national laboratories. His duties included implement - ing the university’s New Business Architecture, overseeing the Digital California Project, and serving on the board guiding the deployment of Internet-2 in California. Mr. Campbell retired from the Army at the rank of Lieutenant General. His 38-year career as a soldier culminated with duty as the Army’s director of information systems for command, control, communications and computers (G6); as CIO for the U.S. Army; and as a military deputy to the Army acquisition executive. During his military career, he held operations and military intelligence positions, including command from company through brigade. As a general officer, he held positions in information management, research and development, and systems acquisition, including 10 years in program executive officer jobs. He represented the U.S. Army on NATO R&D committees, led the cam- paign to improve computer security, initiated a biometric identification 

OCR for page 134
 APPENDIX F program, directed the Advanced Precision Strike Demonstration Program, and was the systems architect for the advanced warfighting experiments that transformed the Army to a digitized force. He currently serves on the Army Science Board and two Defense Science Board panels. He is a past member of the federal and DOD CIO Councils, DOD’s Military Com- munications-Electronics Board, Microsoft’s Global Executive Roundtable, Dell’s Platinum Council, the Bay Area Regional Technology Alliance, the National Science Center Advisory Board, the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California, and the California Information Tech - nology Commission. In addition he served previously as a member of the NRC Committee on Strategies for Network Science, Technology, and Experimentation. Mr. Campbell is a graduate of the Army’s Command and General Staff College and the Naval War College. He earned an MBA with a computer science concentration from Texas Tech University. Dawn C. Meyerriecks,1 Co-Chair, has provided senior leadership busi- ness and technology consulting direction to government and commercial clients. This includes competitive intelligence and landscape, product and service futures and marketability intersection, smart sourcing, and evolving technical and business best practices. In addition to consult - ing, she serves on a number of government and commercial advisory boards, including the STRATCOM C2 Advisory Group, the NSA Advi- sory Board, the Defense Science Board, Cranite Advisory Board, and the SunFed Advisory Board. From 2000 to 2006, Ms. Meyerriecks served as the senior vice president for product technology at AOL. While at AOL, she was responsible for full life-cycle development and integration of all consumer-facing AOL products and services, including the relaunch of aol.com, AOL Instant Messenger, and the open client platform. Prior to AOL, she worked for nearly 10 years at the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), where she was the chief technology officer and techni - cal director for the Joint Interoperability and Engineering Organization (JIEO). Her last assignment was to charter and lead a new Global Infor- mation Grid (GIG) Enterprise Services organization. Ms. Meyerriecks worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a senior engineer and product manager before her tenure at DISA. In addition to being named the Gov- ernment Computer News Department of Defense Person of the Year for 2004, Ms. Meyerriecks has been honored with numerous other awards, including InfoWorld 2002 CTO of the year; Federal Computer Week 2000 Top 100; InfoWorld 2001 CTO of the year for the government sector; the Presidential Distinguished Service Award, November 2001; the Senior 1 Dawn Meyerriecks resigned from the committee in September 2009 upon her appoint - ment as Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Acquisition and Technology.

OCR for page 134
 ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE ACQUISITION OF IT IN THE DOD Executive Service Exceptional Achievement Awards in 1998, 1999, 2000; and the National Performance Review in August 1996. In November 2001, she was featured in Fortune magazine as one of the top 100 intellectual leaders in the world. She earned an M.S. in computer science from Loyola Marymount University. Robert F. Behler is the deputy general manager and senior vice presi - dent in the Command and Control Center at the MITRE Corporation. The center serves MITRE’s Department of Defense sponsors and focuses on creating a joint command, control, and communications system. Mr. Behler leads the center’s work for Department of Defense sponsors. Before joining MITRE in April 2006, Mr. Behler was general manager of Precision Engagement at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Phys - ics Laboratory. In this position he supervised more than 250 scientists and engineers working on advanced command, control, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C2ISR) programs for the Department of Defense. Under Mr. Behler’s leadership, the Precision Engagement organization turned new and emerging technologies into transforma - tional operational capabilities. Mr. Behler retired from the Air Force as a major general in 2003. During his distinguished 31-year career, he accumulated extensive experience in test and evaluation and developing advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) technologies at all levels. He was an experimental test pilot and has flown more than 65 aircraft, including the SR-71 and U-2 aircraft. Before retiring, Mr. Behler was commander of the Air Force C2ISR Center at Langley Air Force Base, where he was principal C2ISR advisor to the Secretary and Chief of Staff of the Air Force. Prior to that, he served as deputy commander of NATO Joint Headquarters North in Stavanger, Norway, and was the senior U.S. military officer in Scandinavia. He has also served as direc - tor of command, control, communication, computers, and intelligence at the U.S. Strategic Command at Offutt Air Force Base and as chief of the U.S. Air Force Senate Liaison Office. Mr. Behler entered the Air Force in 1972 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officer Train - ing Corps program at the University of Oklahoma. He is an associate fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots and a member of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association. Mr. Behler currently serves on the NAS Committee on Advancing Software-Inten - sive Systems Producibility. He earned an M.S in aerospace engineering and an MBA and was a National Security Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

OCR for page 134
 APPENDIX F Philip E. Coyle III is a senior advisor to the president of the World Security Institute, and to its Center for Defense Information, a Washing - ton, D.C.-based national security study center. He is a recognized expert on U.S. and worldwide military research, development and testing; on operational military matters; and on national security policy and defense spending. In 2005 and 2006, Philip Coyle served on the nine-member Defense Base Realignment and Closure Commission, appointed by Presi - dent George W. Bush, and nominated by House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. The commission was responsible to determine those U.S. military bases and facilities to be closed or realigned beginning in late 2005. Begin - ning in late 2004, Mr. Coyle served on Governor Arnold Schwarzeneg - ger’s Base Support and Retention Council, from which he resigned to serve on the President’s Commission. From September 29, 1994, through January 20, 2001, Mr. Coyle was assistant secretary of defense and direc - tor, Operational Test and Evaluation, in the Department of Defense, and is the longest serving director in the 20-year history of the office. In this capacity, he was the principal advisor to the Secretary of Defense on test and evaluation in the DOD. At the DOD, Mr. Coyle’s responsibilities included stewardship of the major range and test facility bases of the DOD, including the large test ranges and test centers that the DOD oper- ates from Maryland and Florida to California and Hawaii. As director, Operational Test and Evaluation, Mr. Coyle had responsibility for over- seeing the test and evaluation of more than 200 major defense acquisition systems. This included reporting to the Secretary of Defense and to Con - gress on the adequacy of the DOD testing programs, and on the results from those testing programs. Mr. Coyle was called on regularly to testify before Congress and to brief congressional staff on the status of major defense acquisition programs. Mr. Coyle has more than 40 years of expe- rience in research, development, and testing matters. From 1959 to 1979, and again from 1981 to 1993, Mr. Coyle worked at the Lawrence Liver- more National Laboratory in Livermore, California. From 1987 to 1993, he served as laboratory associate director and deputy to the laboratory director. In recognition of his 33 years of service to the Laboratory and to the University of California, the university named Mr. Coyle Laboratory Associate Director Emeritus. During the Carter administration, Mr. Coyle served as principal deputy assistant secretary for defense programs in the Department of Energy. In this capacity he had oversight responsibility for the nuclear weapons testing programs of the department. Currently he is serving on the National Research Council Standing Committee on Biodefense at the U.S. Department of Defense, and recently he served on two National Research Council studies of biological agent detection and identification systems. Mr. Coyle graduated from Dartmouth College with an M.S. in mechanical engineering (1957) and a B.A. (1956).

OCR for page 134
 ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE ACQUISITION OF IT IN THE DOD Renato A. DiPentima served as president and chief executive officer of SRA International from January 2005 through March 2007. Prior to assuming this position, he served as president and chief operating offi - cer. He was initially an SRA vice president and chief information officer (CIO). During DiPentima’s tenure at SRA, he helped the company grow from $135 million in revenue to $1.2 billion. Before joining SRA in 1995, DiPentima was deputy commissioner for systems at the Social Security Administration (SSA), overseeing and managing all information process - ing, data, and voice communications systems. He chaired the Federal Information Technology Acquisition Improvement team as part of the President’s National Performance Review initiatives. He also chaired the Industry Advisory Council’s CIO task force, making recommendations to the Federal CIO Council on the roles and responsibility of the new federal CIO. DiPentima is a sought-after speaker on topics dealing with CIO functions and activities, procurement reform, systems moderniza- tion, automation, and business process reengineering. He has received many awards, including two presidential rank awards (distinguished and meritorious service). He was selected by Goernment Computer News as the Industry Executive of the Year in 2000 and the Government Execu - tive of the Year in 1993, and was honored as Executive of the Year by the Federation of Government Information Processing Councils in 1995. In 2003, DiPentima was selected by Federal Computer Week to the Federal 100 for a fifth time, and he also won its prestigious Eagle Award as Industry Executive of the Year. Also in 2003, he was recognized as the Industry Executive of the Year by the Federal CIO Council, which presented him with an Azimuth Award. DiPentima and SRA Founder and Chairman Ernst Volgenau received the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year® 2006 Master Award in Greater Washington. In 2006, DiPentima received the American Council for Technology/Industry Advisory Council Janice K. Mendenhall Spirit of Leadership Award in recognition of his significant contributions to the federal information technology community, from improving communications to professional mentoring. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. John M. Gilligan is president of the Gilligan Group, Inc. Prior to his cur- rent position he was a senior vice president and director, Defense Sector, at SRA International, Inc. Mr. Gilligan has more than 25 years of manage - rial experience in leading large information technology organizations. He has expertise in business strategy, organization growth, organizational innovation, financial management, program implementation, and IT secu- rity. Mr. Gilligan has served as a chief information officer for the United States Air Force and the U.S. Department of Energy. He is a member of the Cyber Security Commission (formed to advise the 44th President) and

OCR for page 134
 APPENDIX F the Army Science Board. He also serves on the board of directors for the Center for Internet Security, Hunter Defense Technologies, Inc., Systems and Software Productivity Consortium, and the Armed Forces Commu - nications and Electronics Association. Mr. Gilligan has been a recipient of the Distinguished Civilian Service Medal, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Distin - guished Executive Presidential Rank Award, and Meritorious Executive Presidential Rank Award, to name a few. He earned an M.B.A. in finance from Virginia Tech University. John Goodenough works at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engi- neering Institute (SEI). He joined the institute in 1986. He is an SEI Fellow and a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He was chief technical officer (CTO) of the SEI for several years and is now lead - ing a major new SEI research project on software assurance. This project, which started in October 2007, is investigating problems and solutions for assuring critical properties of large, complex systems of systems. Among the activities conducted under this project was a set of interviews with test and evaluation personnel and systems of systems developers to gain insight into the nature of large-system test and evaluation problems. Dr. Goodenough is also leading a research project applying new assur- ance concepts (assurance cases) to plug-and-play medical devices. Dr. Goodenough previously was the leader of the SEI’s Performance Critical Systems Initiative, a project focused on the assurance of real-time embed - ded systems through quantitative architectural modeling. The resulting approach is beginning to be used by large aerospace companies both in the United States and in Europe. In recent years, Dr. Goodenough has worked with a number of major systems, in particular, the Army’s Future Combat Systems (FCS) and NASA’s Constellation project. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1970 and an M.A. and an A.B. degree in 1962 and 1961, also from Harvard. Paul J. kern serves as a senior counselor for the Cohen Group. In Novem- ber 2004, Gen. Paul Kern concluded his more than 40-year career in the United States Army when he retired as Commanding General, Army Materiel Command (AMC). In that capacity, and earlier as Commander of the 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized), Gen. Kern left his impact on the Army’s future as he led a drive to digitize and transform its warfighting capabilities. With a staff of more than 50,000 civilians and active mili- tary members, he won wide respect for his efforts to direct supply-chain improvements, maintain field readiness, and modernize weapons systems throughout the Army while still controlling costs. In June 2004, Gen. Kern undertook a vastly different responsibility when then-Secretary Rumsfeld tapped him to lead the military’s internal investigation into the abuses at

OCR for page 134
0 ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE ACQUISITION OF IT IN THE DOD the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Prior to his command at AMC, he served as the military deputy to the assistant secretary of the Army for acquisi - tion, logistics and technology and was the senior military advisor to the army acquisition executive and the Army Chief of Staff on all research, development, and acquisition programs and related issues. He supervised the Program Executive Officer system and served as the director of the Army Acquisition Corps. Gen. Kern’s career has also had stops in the Secretary of Defense office in Washington and several field units. As the senior military assistant to then-Secretary of Defense William Perry, Gen. Kern ensured that the secretary’s guidance was implemented throughout the department and in the handling of the most sensitive decisions for the secretary. During that tenure he traveled with Secretary Perry to more than 70 countries, meeting numerous heads of state, foreign ministers, and international defense leaders. He is a member of the board of direc- tors of COVANT Technologies, LLC, and iRobot Corporation. Gen. Kern was commissioned as an Armor lieutenant following graduation from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1967. In 2007 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for bringing modern digitization technology to bear on military effectiveness, training, and procurement. He holds master’s degrees in both civil and mechanical engineering that he earned in 1973 from the University of Michigan. H. Steven kimmel serves as corporate vice president for Alion Science and Technology. He is responsible for their strategic plans and imple- mentation to achieve Alion growth. He leads Alion’s management of federal, state, local, and commercial opportunity tracking, capture plans, bid review, and proposal preparation development activities. Prior to join- ing Alion—a 3600 employee-owned, $800 million professional engineer- ing services company—he was vice president of corporate development, Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (2000-2002), where he assessed and devised federal marketplace penetration strategies. At TRW (1998-2000), he was the vice president of business development for the Systems and Information Technology Group, Information Technology and Services Division. There he implemented market capture strategies for C4ISR; logistics, supply and maintenance; test and evaluation; and mission, weapons, and force structure operational analysis principally for Defense Department customers. He began his private-sector endeav - ors in 1993 at BDM Federal as vice president and assistant business unit general manager for test and evaluation. During the 5 years with BDM he was engaged in company-wide system and operational effectiveness analysis programs that included modeling and simulation of military weapons and C4I systems, logistics (wholesale supply, ammunition, and maintenance operations) and automated (business) information systems

OCR for page 134
 APPENDIX F in support of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Staff, military departments, defense agencies, and commercial clients. During his federal civil service career he achieved Senior Executive Service Level 5 status. During the period 1985 through 1993, he served on the Defense Acquisi- tion Board (DAB) and the Major Automated Information System Review Council (MAISRC) at the Office of the Secretary of Defense. As such he advised the Secretary of Defense on matters affecting major DOD pro - gram development and production matters. His OSD positions included deputy director, defense research and engineering (plans and resources); deputy director, acquisition policy and program integration; deputy direc- tor, test and evaluation; and deputy under secretary of defense acquisi - tion (systems evaluation). He earned a doctorate of science from George Washington University in 1983. Deidre A. Lee, executive vice president of federal affairs and operations, Professional Services Council, served for 32 years in various positions in numerous federal agencies. She retired from the position of director of management and chief acquisition officer for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security in March 2008. Her responsibilities at FEMA included oversight and management of six of FEMA’s lines of business: the Offices of Human Resources, Informa - tion Technology, Procurement, Facilities, Security, and Disaster Workforce. Before joining FEMA, Ms. Lee served in the General Services Adminis- tration’s Federal Acquisition Service (FAS) as assistant commissioner of integrated technology services, providing FAS technology and profes- sional services offerings to customer agencies. From 2000 through 2005, she was the director of defense procurement and acquisition policy at the Department of Defense, where she was responsible for department-wide acquisition and procurement policy matters. Ms. Lee also served in the presidentially appointed, Senate-confirmed position of administrator of the Office of Federal Procurement policy in the Office of Management and Budget and as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s assistant administrator for procurement. Ms. Lee holds a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Oklahoma. Joshua S. Levine is the chief executive officer of ESP Technologies Corpo- ration, a rapidly growing financial technology and solutions provider to the largest global buy-side financial institutions. Previously, as the chief technology, operations and customer service officer of E*Trade Financial Corp., he was responsible for servicing its banking and brokerage custom- ers. He has been a managing director at Morgan Stanley and at Deutsche Bank. Mr. Levine is a member of several corporate boards, including Securify, Xceedium, and Logical Information Machines. He is a former

OCR for page 134
 ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE ACQUISITION OF IT IN THE DOD board member of Archivas, purchased by Hitachi and StorageApps, and then purchased by Hewlett-Packard. Mr. Levine is a board member of the nonprofit DonorsChoose.org and an advisory board member to the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center. He is a former board member of the Georgia Technology Authority. Mr. Levine is the recipient of many tech- nology industry awards and an honorary doctorate. He is the co-author of Application Systems in APL, published by Prentice-Hall. Nachiappan Nagappan works on empirical software engineering and measurement (ESM) at Microsoft Research and is based in Microsoft’s Redmond, Washington, research facility. Prior to his current position he earned a Ph.D. in computer science from North Carolina State University in 2005. Dr. Nagappan’s research interests are in the field of software reliability, software measurement and testing, and empirical software engineering. He has also worked on social factors in software engineering, aspect-oriented software development, and computer science education. Currently his research focuses on the application of software measure- ment and statistical modeling to large software systems. He works on the MetriZone project that is targeted at making early estimates of software quality to predict postrelease failures, and is currently focused on the next-generation Windows operating system (Vista). Dr. Nagappan is also working with the WinSE team in the Windows Core Operating Systems Division building next-generation change, risk, and impact analysis tools. His tools have been used in product teams such as Windows Mobile for risk analysis and test prioritization. His research work has also commer- cially shipped as part of the Visual Studio Team System 2005 and 2008 releases. Frank A. Perry is the chief technology officer and chief systems engineer for Science Applications International Corporation’s Defense Solutions Group, and is also a senior vice president. As the senior technical author- ity across the group, Dr. Perry is responsible for technology leadership and engineering oversight for all programs in the CMMI® Maturity Level 5 Group of more than 12,000 employees, whose charter spans system engi- neering and integration, command, control and communications; mission systems; modeling, simulation, and training; and enterprise systems and services. Prior to his current position Dr. Perry was the chief technology officer of the Department of Veterans Affairs, where he was responsible for developing the department’s first-ever enterprise architecture. He was the driving technical force behind the consolidation of more than 30 inde - pendent networks into an integrated enterprise network, the department’s Enterprise Cyber Security Infrastructure program, and rationalization of the department’s major processing centers to include electronic vaulting

OCR for page 134
 APPENDIX F and continuity of operations. From 1998 to 2001 Dr. Perry served as the technical director of the Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Com- mand (SPAWAR), and from 1995 to 1998 he was the technical director of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). At SPAWAR he was a key technical leader behind execution of the Navy’s IT-21 initiative, which during his tenure installed broadband IP connectivity, LAN infra- structure, and C4I and combat support computing infrastructure across the fleet. At DISA Dr. Perry was a key technical leader in the develop- ment of the Global Command and Control System (GCCS) and took the program in 22 months from inception to worldwide deployment, and shutdown of the major legacy World Wide Command and Control System (WWMCCS), which had been entrenched since the mid-1970s. He also was a key architect behind the Defense-In-Depth Information Assurance approach adopted across the DOD, and he personally drove the initia- tion of the DOD public key infrastructure, the largest in existence. Prior to federal service as a senior executive Dr. Perry was a partner in several engineering services firms and served in the U.S. Navy as an engineer- ing duty officer. Dr. Perry is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA), the National Defense Industrial Asso- ciation (NDIA), the Association for Enterprise Integration (AFEI), and the International Council on System Engineering (INCOSE). Dr. Perry holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering with a minor in computer science from the Naval Postgraduate School. Vaho Rebassoo is the chief technology officer for the Boeing Company’s Shared Services Group. He has more than 30 years of experience in sys - tems engineering and technical management in network and computing. This includes key roles at the Pentagon Telecommunications Center, at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and at Boeing, designing, implementing, and operating large complex networks and computing infrastructures. He joined Boeing in 1984 as chief engineer for the Boeing Telephone Ser- vice Modernization Program. He assumed responsibility for all network operations in 1988 and for network technical services in 1992. In 2000, he was assigned responsibility for computing technical services enterprise- wide. In his current role at Boeing he is responsible for strategic plan - ning and direction for computing infrastructure technology in the Boeing Company. Dr. Rebassoo is a member of numerous boards of directors and executive advisory boards, including the Washington Technology Alliance Board, the Department of State Telecommunications Advisory Committee, the UCLA Wireless Research Council, and the Pacific Institute for Mathematical Sciences Board. He earned a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Washington in 1977.

OCR for page 134
 ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE ACQUISITION OF IT IN THE DOD Daniel C. Sturman is an engineering director at Google, Inc. At Google he is leading the development of software infrastructure that enables Google applications to operate and scale across massive distributed sys - tems. Areas of focus include storage systems, data systems, Web search engines, networking, and cluster management. Prior to joining Google, he held several technical and managerial positions at IBM. Most recently, he was director, development for DB2 on Linux, Unix, and Windows in IBM’s Information Managment Division. Products developed by his team include DB2, DB2 Data Warehouse Edition, and DB2 Alphablox. In this role, he was responsible for timely and quality release of these products including DB2 “Viper” v9 and the first DB2 Data Warehouse Edition (v 9.1). Before joining the DB2 team, he was director for emerging technologies in the IBM Software Group, where he ensured that future technical trends were captured within IBM products, directing research and incubation efforts for the Software Group. In particular, Sturman focused on helping IBM’s customers successfully implement Service- oriented architectures through an enterprise service bus approach and drove the vision behind the WebSphere ESB. He started at IBM as a researcher at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, where his research focused on revolutionizing the way people build and use distributed sys - tems. His research concentrated on technologies for enterprise messaging and utility computing. Sturman’s work on enterprise messaging systems addressed the scalability, performance, and availability of content-based publish/subscribe systems. This work helped form the basis for IBM’s WebSphere Business Integrator Message Broker. His work on the Gry- phon system broke significant new ground in the scale, performance, and functionality of publish/subscribe systems supporting wide-area networks. His research in computing utilities focused on enabling the dynamic provisioning of complete services over the Internet, to reduce the cost of ownership, provide solution availability, and maintain guaranteed service levels. He earned a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. CSTB STAFF Jon Eisenberg is director of the Computer Science and Telecommuni- cations Board of the National Academies. At CSTB, he has also been study director for more than a dozen major studies, including a series of reports exploring Internet and broadband policy and networking and communications technologies. From 1995 to 1997 he was a AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on technology transfer and information and telecommunications policy issues. Dr. Eisenberg received his Ph.D. in

OCR for page 134
 APPENDIX F physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and a B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1988. kevin Lewis is a senior program officer and study director at the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment. He has served as a study director on a diverse body of work that includes a study address- ing the challenge of aging avionics for the Air Force and the issue of emerging technologies within the facilities asset management domain. His career includes experience within business development and technol - ogy policy formation in the information technology services industry. He co-authored a book on open systems in his capacity as the co-chair of an ANSI/IEEE standard effort addressing open systems standards devel- opment. He received his bachelor’s of science degree from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, and his master’s in business management from Central Michigan University in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. Lynette I. Millett is a senior program officer and study director at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies. She currently directs several CSTB projects, including a comprehensive exploration of sustaining growth in computing performance and an examination of how best to develop complex, software-intensive systems in the DOD environment. She served as study director for the CSTB reports Social Security Administration Elec- tronic Serice Proision: A Strategic Assessment (August 2007) and Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Eidence? (May 2007). Millett’s portfolio includes significant portions of CSTB’s recent work on software, identity systems, and privacy. She directed the project that produced Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Priacy, a discussion of authen- tication technologies and their privacy implications; and IDs—Not That Easy: Questions about Nationwide Identity Systems, a post-9/11 analysis of the challenges presented by large-scale identity systems. She has an M.Sc. in computer science from Cornell University, where her work was supported by graduate fellowships from the National Science Founda- tion and the Intel Corporation; and a B.A. with honors in mathematics and computer science from Colby College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Renee Hawkins is the financial and administrative manager for the Com- puter Science and Telecommunications Board. Since 1990, she has been responsible for the financial management of the board. Ms. Hawkins’ longtime, hands-on fiscal management experience includes detailed track- ing of costs for as many as 15 projects in progress simultaneously, finan-

OCR for page 134
 ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE ACQUISITION OF IT IN THE DOD cial reporting, and contract administration. Prior to joining CSTB, Ms. Hawkins provided administrative support to the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board. She has been with the National Academies since 1984. Ms. Hawkins is currently pursuing a B.A. degree in finance and economics at the University of Maryland/Prince Georges’ Community College Alliance Program, where she maintains a position on the Dean’s List. Morgan Motto, a program associate with CSTB from December 2007 until April 2009, supported several projects. Previously, she worked with the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST). Prior to coming to the NRC, Ms. Motto worked as a project manager for international affairs and technology at the U.S. Pan Asian American Chamber of Com- merce. She earned a B.A. in international affairs and East Asian studies from the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. Virginia Bacon Talati is a program associate for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. She formerly served as a program associate with the Frontiers of Engineering program at the National Academy of Engineering. Prior to her work at the Acad - emies, she served as a senior project assistant in education technology at the National School Boards Association. She has a B.S. in science, technol - ogy, and culture from the Georgia Institute of Technology and an M.P.P. from George Mason University with a focus in science and technology policy.