TABLE 2-1 New Populations and Communities Established Throughout the Country by Deep Demographic Changes

 

Asian and Pacific Islander

Hispanic/Latino

1970

2007

1970

2007

California

2.8%

13.7%

13.7%

36.7%

Georgia

0.1%

3.2%

0.6%

7.9%

Idaho

0.5%

1.7%

2.6%

10.0%

Kansas

0.2%

2.6%

2.1%

9.0%

Minnesota

0.2%

3.9%

0.6%

4.1%

North Carolina

0.1%

2.2%

0.4%

7.2%

Utah

0.6%

2.6%

4.1%

11.8%

SOURCE: Bureau of the Census (1970) and data provided by E. Richard Brown, based on his analyses of Census and other data. Table created by E. Richard Brown.

data from six states not typically known to receive immigrants as well as California and shows the demographic changes that have occurred. In 2007, for example, Utah’s Latino population was nearly 12 percent of the state’s population, whereas its Latino population was only 4 percent of the state’s population in 1970. The changes have also been dramatic in California, where, due to a long history of immigration, no population, ethnic, or racial group makes up a majority in the state today. Therefore, the ability to track these patterns is critical.

The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) is a comprehensive statewide survey of the health status of California residents. Sufficiently large samples of key demographic subgroups are surveyed, providing good information about immigration status, citizenship status, and so on. There is also a strong emphasis on the dissemination of the data from CHIS, with the goal being to be a source of evidence for policy discussions and policy development. The survey is conducted every 2 years, and $1 out of every $5 allocated for the survey goes toward dissemination. The CHIS also contains a data query system that allows free online access to the data. This helps get the data into the hands of the people who can use it to reduce and eliminate health disparities.

In both established communities and new communities, social stratification leads to health disparities between groups. There are disparities in health and health care by race and ethnicity, income, rural versus urban residential location, gender, and other social characteristics. For example, a disparity is said to occur if the data show that there are differences in the utilization of preventive services that all members of a population group should be receiving and differences in social factors unrelated to the incidence or the prevalence of disease. In other words, if there are differences



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