B
Biographical Sketches

COMMITTEE

Julia Kornegay (Chair) is professor and head of the Department of Horticultural Science at North Carolina State University. Prior to 2003, Dr. Kornegay served as director of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (1999–2003) and as its director of research (1997–1999). Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is one of the world’s premier tropical botanical gardens with international research, horticulture, and educational programs in palm biology, plant systematics, tropical fruit crops, endangered species conservation, and graduate studies. During her tenure, Fairchild’s programmatic activities and budgets increased more than 30 percent. She also served as adjunct professor at Florida International University and the University of Miami. From 1985 to 1997, Dr. Kornegay worked at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in Cali, Colombia, as leader of the Bean Program (1993–1996) and senior plant breeder. She was responsible for an international team of scientists based in six countries in Latin America and Africa, working to increase sustainable bean production and income for farmers and their communities in Third World countries. She organized five regional research networks in Latin America and Africa and obtained $10 million from international donor agencies to support their activities. She also spearheaded the Seeds of Hope program in Africa in 1994 to help Rwanda recover its crop germplasm after the end of its civil war. In 1996, she was recognized by the regional bean program PROFRIZA and the national agricultural research programs of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia for her work in increasing bean production and research capacity in the Andean Region. More than 30 cultivars from her breeding program have been released in eight countries. Dr. Kornegay has a PhD in plant breeding and genetics from Cornell University, and an MS in plant pathology and a BS in horticultural science from North Carolina State University. She went to high school in Nairobi, Kenya.


Richard Harwood (Vice Chair) is the retired chair for sustainable agriculture at Michigan State University. He is an agronomist with a personal research interest in the management



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B Biographical Sketches COMMITTEE Julia Kornegay (Chair) is professor and head of the Department of Horticultural Science at North Carolina State University. Prior to 2003, Dr. Kornegay served as director of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (1999–2003) and as its director of research (1997–1999). Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is one of the world’s premier tropical botanical gardens with inter- national research, horticulture, and educational programs in palm biology, plant systemat- ics, tropical fruit crops, endangered species conservation, and graduate studies. During her tenure, Fairchild’s programmatic activities and budgets increased more than 30 percent. She also served as adjunct professor at Florida International University and the University of Miami. From 1985 to 1997, Dr. Kornegay worked at the International Center for Tropi- cal Agriculture (CIAT) in Cali, Colombia, as leader of the Bean Program (1993–1996) and senior plant breeder. She was responsible for an international team of scientists based in six countries in Latin America and Africa, working to increase sustainable bean production and income for farmers and their communities in Third World countries. She organized five regional research networks in Latin America and Africa and obtained $10 million from international donor agencies to support their activities. She also spearheaded the Seeds of Hope program in Africa in 1994 to help Rwanda recover its crop germplasm after the end of its civil war. In 1996, she was recognized by the regional bean program PROFRIZA and the national agricultural research programs of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia for her work in increasing bean production and research capacity in the Andean Region. More than 30 cultivars from her breeding program have been released in eight countries. Dr. Kornegay has a PhD in plant breeding and genetics from Cornell University, and an MS in plant pathology and a BS in horticultural science from North Carolina State University. She went to high school in Nairobi, Kenya. Richard Harwood (Vice Chair) is the retired chair for sustainable agriculture at Michigan State University. He is an agronomist with a personal research interest in the management 

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0 APPENDIX B of soil biological activity for enhancement of nutrient flow. Ongoing research includes the contribution of cover crops to soil biological activity and to nutrient flow. He was direc- tor of the Research Center at Rodale and subsequently director of the Asian Program at Winrock International prior to his arrival at Michigan State University. Dr. Harwood held the C.S. Mott Chair for Sustainable Agriculture position at Michigan State University from 1990 to 2003. He provided leadership in research, teaching, and extension of sustainable agricultural systems for Michigan’s agriculture. He brought national and international per- spectives to Michigan from his service on the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources and the Board on Sustainable Development (National Research Council), on the Technical Advisory Committee of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, and as former chair of the Board of Management of the Tropical Soil Biology and Fertility Programme. Dr. Harwood has a PhD in horticulture from Michigan State University. Sandra S. Batie is Elton R. Smith Professor in Food and Agricultural Policy at Michigan State University (MSU), and she conducts research on food, agricultural, and environmental policy issues at the state, federal, and international level. Prior to joining MSU in 1993, she had been on the faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University since 1973. She has actively served on commissions and boards that are related to her expertise, including the National Academy of Sciences Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources; the Academy’s Center for Central Europe and Eurasia Affairs; and the Office of Technology Assessment. She is a trustee of Winrock International and was a trustee of the International Rice Research Institute. She is past president of the American Agricultural Economics As- sociation as well as of the Southern Agricultural Economics Association. She is a Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association. She teaches a graduate course in environmental economics and conducts extension programming on food, agricultural, and environmental policies. Dr. Batie received her MS and PhD from Oregon State University. Dale Bucks is president of Bucks Natural Resources Management. In his 36 years of service to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Dr. Bucks was both a highly regarded scientist and an exceptional leader. He was one of the first agricul- tural scientists to conduct drip (micro) irrigation research, provide innovative solutions to clogging problems that plagued drip irrigation systems, demonstrate the feasibility of continuous cropping systems using subsurface drip irrigation, improve methods for conducting research on crop water requirements and irrigation scheduling, and revitalize guayule research efforts. He led research studies to develop technologies and salinity con- trol methods for the Colorado River Salinity Control Project. He also led a team of scientists who conducted original research on quantifying the effects of spatial and temporal vari- ability of irrigation water applications on crop yields. He was the national program leader for Water Quality and Management in Maryland for 18 years (1988–2006), where he pro- vided program planning and direction to more than 250 scientists throughout the nation. He was a coleader of the Management Systems Evaluation Area and Conservation Effects Assessment Project for ARS that has resulted in increased efforts in agricultural systems research. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, and he was the recipient of the “Distinguished Engineer Award” from South Dakota State University in 1997. He authored or co-authored more than 150 scientific publications while he was a research scientist in Arizona for 18 years (1970–1988). He received his PhD from the University of Arizona in soil and water science. Cornelia Flora is director of the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development and Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Sociology

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 APPENDIX B at Iowa State University. She joined the Iowa State faculty and was named director of the Center in 1994. Her research interests include international and domestic development, community, and the sociology of science and technology, particularly as related to agri- culture and participatory change. Her current research includes work on the generation of social capital in community development, community, sustainable agriculture and natural resource management, with particular attention to how class, gender, and ethnicity influ- ence and are affected by technology and policy. Many of her articles have been widely used by nonprofit organizations that work with farmer groups, particularly in sustainable agriculture, to build stronger communities and a stronger economic base. She has held several academic positions and has also been a program officer for the Ford Foundation. In addition to her responsibilities at the Center, she works on international development issues with the World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Dr. Flora received a BA from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MS and PhD from Cornell University, which recognized her with an Outstanding Alumni Award in 1994. James C. Hanson is an extension economist at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research interests include sustainable agriculture, cropping systems, organic agricul- ture, agricultural extension systems, environmental policy, and farm management. He re- ceived his PhD in agriculture and resource economics from the University of Maryland, an MS in plant breeding and genetics from the University of Minnesota, and a BS in agronomy from the University of Maryland. Douglas Jackson-Smith is an associate professor of sociology at Utah State University. Dr. Jackson-Smith joined the faculty at Utah State University in the summer of 2001, where he currently serves as the director of graduate studies in the Sociology Program. His princi- pal teaching and research interests include the sociology of agriculture, natural resources, and the environment; rural community studies; economic sociology; and applied research methods. He is also interested in international development, social studies of science and technology, and political sociology. Currently he is engaged in research focusing on dynam- ics of economic and technological change in the dairy industry and their effects on farm families, rural communities, and the environment. He has also developed methods to track the spatial dimensions of rural and agricultural land use changes, and has worked with rural governments to develop locally appropriate land use and agricultural plans. Before going to Utah State University, he served as assistant professor of rural sociology and ur- ban and regional planning at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also was codirector of the Program on Agricultural Technology Studies (a research and extension unit of the College of Agriculture), which examined the impacts of technological change and public policies on farm families in Wisconsin. He received his BS in rural sociology from Cornell University, and his MS in sociology, MA in agricultural economics, and PhD from the Uni- versity of Wisconsin, Madison. William A. Jury is a Distinguished Professor of Soil Physics in the Department of Environ- mental Sciences at University of California, Riverside. His principal research interests are measurement and modeling of organic and inorganic chemical movement and reactions in field soils; development and testing of organic chemical screening models; and charac- terization of volatilization losses of organic compounds. At present, Dr. Jury is conducting research in field measurement and modeling of preferential flow of chemicals, chemical transport at low water content, unstable flow of water in soil, global water management, and sequential reuse of agricultural drainage water. Dr. Jury received his PhD in physics from the University of Wisconsin.

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 APPENDIX B Deanne Meyer is a livestock waste management specialist in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California, Davis. Her research activities focus on current and future needs of livestock operators related to environmental sustainability, regulatory compliance, and economic feasibility. She also looks at manure management systems, op- erational efficiency of manure equipment, interactions between manure management and utilization and water and air resources, and dietary manipulation to reduce nutrient excre- tion. She received her PhD in animal science from the University of Florida. John P. Reganold is Regents Professor of Soil Science at Washington State University, where he teaches soil science and organic farming classes, and conducts research. Dr. Reganold has completed numerous studies measuring the effects of conventional, integrated, and organic farming systems on soil health, crop quality, financial performance, and environ- mental quality in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Dr. Reganold has more than 120 publications, some of which have appeared in Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Scientific American, and New Scientist. He has also co-authored the widely used college text Natural Resource Conservation (9th edition) and co-edited the book Organic Agriculture: A Global Perspective. His research in sustainable ag- riculture has been featured in hundreds of newspapers, several science magazines, and on many radio and TV programs. He has given more than 150 invited presentations all over the world. Dr. Reganold received his bachelor’s degree in German from the University of California, Berkeley, his MS in soil science from the University of California, Berkeley, and his PhD in soil science from University of California, Davis. August Schumacher, Jr., is advisor to SJH and Company. He is the former under secretary for farm and foreign agricultural services at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). He was responsible for the domestic commodities, insurance, and farm credit operations of USDA. In addition, he was in charge of USDA’s international trade and development programs. Prior to his appointment in August 1997, he was the administrator of the Foreign Agricultural Service for three years. Before going to USDA, Mr. Schumacher served as the Massachusetts commissioner of food and agriculture and as a senior agricultural project officer at the World Bank. From a farm family in Lexington, Massachusetts, Mr. Schumacher attended Harvard College and the London School of Economics, and was a research associ- ate in agribusiness at the Harvard Business School. Henning Sehmsdorf was appointed adjunct professor in the Center for Sustainable Agri- culture and Natural Resources in November 1999 to implement a for-credit internship in ecological farming and sustainable living for Washington State University (WSU) students at S&S Homestead Farm. From 1968–1994, Dr. Sehmsdorf taught humanities at universities in the United States, England, Germany, and Scandinavia. Since 1970, he has been developing a holistically managed, integrated farm on Lopez Island, Washington, that produces as many inputs required to grow food and fiber on the farm as possible. The farm presently grows vegetables, fruit, flowers, beef, dairy, pork, lamb, poultry and eggs, animal forages, grain, and fertilizers. The internship program was established in 1994 and to date has trained 20 students in sustainable agriculture, agronomy, soil science, nutrition, environmental educa- tion, and related fields, with most of the trainees going on to graduate study after completing their internships. Interns also collaborate in grant-supported, on-farm research with WSU and extension faculty. Dr. Sehmsdorf has a PhD in the humanities from the University of Chicago, a BS in general science from the University of Rochester, and is a graduate in busi- ness administration from Kaufmännische Berufsschule in Rastatt, Germany.

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 APPENDIX B Carol Shennan is a professor of environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Until June 30, 2007, she served as director for the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems at the university. She joined the Environmental Studies De- partment from the Department of Vegetable Crops at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Shennan’s interests encompass interdisciplinary studies of agroecosystems, including watershed, on-farm, experimental, social science, and participatory research approaches. Topics include: nutrient cycling and interactions between cropland management and sur- face water, ground water, and wetland ecosystems; biodiversity conservation on farmland; understanding farmer decision making; farmer and consumer attitudes; opportunities to enhance farm viability and sustainability through market, policy, and educational ap- proaches; international agriculture development; resource management in resource-poor systems; and gender issues. Dr. Shennan’s current research examines the ecological and social dimensions of agricultural sustainability in a number of contrasting systems; a) in- tensive vegetable/strawberry production systems in the Monterey Bay region; b) irrigated rice production in Senegal; c) subsistence maize production in southern Malawi; d) enset- based agriculture in southwestern Ethiopian highlands; and e) grazing, crop production, and grassland conservation in Inner Mongolia (project in development stage). All studies involve working closely on-farm with groups of farmers and other interested parties. Dr. Shennan received her PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK. Lori Ann Thrupp is the manager of sustainability and organic development at Fetzer Vineyards. She undertakes outreach and educational events about organic and sustain- able farming practices for growers and the broader community. She develops partnerships with growers, scientists, government agencies, and other stakeholders involved in sustain- ability initiatives. She also serves as a consultant and was formerly managing director for the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance, a nonprofit organization supporting sustainable practices. Previously Dr. Thrupp worked with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Agriculture Initiative, managing partnerships and a grant program for growers and agricultural organizations involved in sustainable agriculture and pest management. She also has been a consultant in sustainable agriculture for Robert Mondavi Winery, the Roots of Change Fund, and several other organizations and companies. She has many years of experience in international agriculture education, research, and policy analysis. From 1990–1998, she was director of sustainable agriculture at the World Resources Institute. She has written more than 70 publications, is a graduate of the California Agriculture Leader- ship Program (CALP), and serves on the Fellows Council for CALP. She is a current board member of the Organic Farming Research Foundation. Dr. Thrupp received a PhD and MA from Sussex University and a BA from Stanford University. Paul Willis is the manager of Niman Ranch Pork Company. He lives on the farm where he grew up, in Thornton, Iowa, about 100 miles north of Des Moines. Mr. Willis’s passions have always included animals and taking care of the land. It is this passion that led him to join the Peace Corps, where he worked as the Young Farmers Club organizer for the Nigerian Ministry of Agriculture. During his tenure, he grew the club’s membership to more than 10,000. In 1995, Mr. Willis was looking for a way to market natural “free range” pigs when he met Bill Niman. Mr. Willis wanted to revitalize traditional hog farming in the Midwest at a time when economics forced many farmers to sell out or turn to factory/confinement hog growing. Niman Ranch offered the opportunity to raise pigs the humane, old-fashioned way and these outdoor-raised pigs quickly became a favorite among Niman Ranch cus- tomers. Today, Mr. Willis manages a network of more than 500 family hog farmers. In ad-

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 APPENDIX B dition to managing the Niman Ranch pork operation, he still raises 2,500 Farmers’ Hybrid hogs with his wife, Phyllis, and business partner, Jon Carlson, on the Willis Free Range Pig Farm. He also grows his own non-GMO soybean and organic alfalfa and oats, which are used for feed and bedding. Mr. Willis received his BA from the University of Iowa. CONSULTANTS Lawrence E. Elworth is the executive director of the Center for Agricultural Partnerships (CAP), a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to solving agricultural problems by help- ing farmers adopt more environmentally sound and profitable practices. Mr. Elworth has worked with more than 100 partners involved in the commercial production of more than a dozen crops, including lettuce, celery, apples, pears, cotton, soybeans, corn, wheat, wal- nuts, and peanuts. CAP projects have successfully implemented innovations that improve agriculture’s impact on natural resources in 15 states. Mr. Elworth served in senior policy positions at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the White House, and raised tree fruit in Virginia and Pennsylvania. He received his BA from Guilford College and his MBA from Mount Saint Mary’s. C. Clare Hinrichs is an associate professor of rural sociology at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research, teaching, and public engagement activities are all concerned with societal transitions to sustainability, with particular attention to food systems, agriculture, and the environment. She has conducted farming-systems-oriented field research with dairy farmers, maple syrup producers, swine farmers, and organic growers. Her current projects focus on organizational strategies and outcomes of localizing food systems in a globalizing environment and on the sustainability and rural development implications of biomass energy crop production. Dr. Hinrichs received her PhD in development sociology from Cornell University. Susan Smalley is the director of the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems at Michigan State University, a group that engages communities in applied research and out- reach to promote sustainable food systems with a goal to improve access and availability of healthful, locally produced food. She helped to establish and serves as an advisor to the Michigan Farmers Market Association. Her work includes research and outreach dealing with developing and enhancing farmers’ markets, sustainable farming, organic farming, direct marketing, and developing sustainable food and farming businesses. Dr. Smalley has additional experience in extension education and leadership development, including Myers-Briggs®, experiential learning, and new instructional approaches. She serves as the Michigan coordinator for small and part-time farming and is a past Michigan coordinator for Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE). She has a BS in home econom- ics, MA in adult and continuing education, and PhD in extension education from Michigan State University.