A
Workshop Agenda

FEBRUARY 19, 2009

8:30-8:45 AM

Welcome and Housekeeping

Marcia Linn, University of California, Berkeley, Committee Chair

8:45-10:30 AM

Panel 1—The Scope and Nature of Computational Thinking

  • How is computational thinking different from mathematical thinking?

  • How is it different from quantitative reasoning?

  • How is it different from scientific thinking?

  • How is it different from fluency with information technology?

Presenters:

Jeannette Wing, National Science Foundation

Wm. Wulf, University of Virginia

Gerald Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Peter Lee, Carnegie Mellon University

Committee respondent: Larry Snyder



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A Workshop Agenda FEBRUARy 19, 2009 8:30-8:45 AM Welcome and Housekeeping arcia Linn, Uniersity of California, Berkeley, Committee M Chair 8:45-10:30 AM Panel 1—The Scope and Nature of Computational Thinking • ow is computational thinking different from math- H ematical thinking? • How is it different from quantitative reasoning? • How is it different from scientific thinking? • ow is it different from fluency with information H technology? Presenters: Jeannette Wing, National Science Foundation Wm. Wulf, Uniersity of Virginia Gerald Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Peter Lee, Carnegie Mellon Uniersity Committee respondent: Larry Snyder 

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0 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON COMPUTATIONAL THINKING 10:30-12:15 PM Panel 2—Computational Thinking Everywhere (Part I) • hat kinds of problems require computational think- W ing? What are some examples? • ow, if at all, does computational thinking vary by H discipline? What would be the nature of computa- tional thinking for physicists, biologists, engineers, lawyers, physicians, historians, sociologists, teachers, accountants, homemakers, bus drivers, and so on? • hat are the exposures and experiences needed to W develop the level of computational thinking needed in various disciplines? • hat are contemporary issues facing the nation that W would benefit from greater development of compu- tational thinking? • hat is the value of computational thinking for W nonscientists? • ow, if at all, would widespread facility with com- H putational thinking enhance the productivity of U.S. workers? • ow do we best illustrate the power of computa- H tional thinking? Presenters: Kein Ashley, Uniersity of Pittsburgh Chris Hoffmann, Purdue Uniersity Alan Kay, Viewpoints Research Institute, Inc. Richard Lipton, Georgia Tech Robert Sproull, Sun Microsystems, Inc. Committee respondent: M. Brian Blake 12:15-1:15 PM Working Lunch—Other Related Ongoing Efforts Andrew Bernat: CRA Education Committee eter Denning: Great Principles of Computing (ia ideo- P conference)

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 APPENDIX A 1:15-3:00 PM Panel 3—Computational Thinking Everywhere (Part II) Presenters: Andrew McGettrick, Uniersity of Strathclyde (inited) Edward Fox, Virginia Tech an Foster, Argonne National Laboratory/Uniersity of I Chicago (ia conference call) Paulo Blikstein, Northwestern Uniersity Eric Roberts, Stanford Uniersity Committee respondent: Robert Constable 3:00-3:10 PM Break 3:10-4:40 PM Panel 4—Technology and Computational Thinking (Show and Tell) • hat affordances are provided by new technologies W for computational thinking? • hat is the role of information technology in impart- W ing computational thinking skills? • hat parts of computational thinking can be taught W without the use of computers? Without the skills of computer programming? Participants: Mitchel Resnick, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ken Kahn, Oxford Uniersity Daid Moursund, Uniersity of Oregon Committee respondent: Janet Kolodner 4:40-4:45 PM Break 4:45-5:15 PM Other Related Ongoing Efforts im Bell, New Zealand Computer Science Unplugged (ia T ideoconference) 5:15-5:30 PM Wrap-up 5:30 Adjourn Day-One Public Sessions

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 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON COMPUTATIONAL THINKING 5:30-6:15 PM Reception 6:15-8:15 PM Working Dinner in Small Groups • omework assignment—What is the core of compu- H tational thinking? What are the fundamental prin- ciples of computational thinking? What concepts are derivative from the fundamentals? • re there multiple decompositions of computational A thinking into fundamental and derivative parts? What are some examples? • ow, if at all, can computational thinking be decom- H posed into an intellectual hierarchy? FEBRUARy 20, 2009 8:30-8:35 AM Welcome and Housekeeping Marcia Linn, Uniersity of Berkeley, Committee Chair 8:35-10:00 AM Panel 5—Report-back on homework assignments: Committee respondent: Alfred Aho 10:00-10:15 AM Break 10:15-11:45 AM Panel 6—Bridging into Education • re the fundamental principles of computational A thinking the easiest to grasp? If so, why? If not, why not? • re the fundamental principles the logical starting A point for the teaching of computational thinking? If so, why? If not, why not? Participants: Dor Abrahamson,Uniersity of California, Berkeley Owen Astrachan, Duke Uniersity Lenore Blum, Carnegie Mellon Uniersity Andy diSessa, Uniersity of California, Berkeley Andy diSessa, Uniersity of California, Berkeley Committee respondent: Uri Wilensky

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 APPENDIX A 11:45-12:45 PM Working Lunch—Computer Science Advanced Place- ment Efforts Jan Cuny, National Science Foundation 12:45-2:15 PM Panel 7—Related Best Practices in Teaching/Pedagogy • ow do we engage all learners in computational H thinking? • hat are the exposures and experiences needed to W develop computational thinking? • hat is the role of the computer in instruction? Where W does programming fit into computational thinking? Presenters: Roy Pea, Stanford Uniersity Allan Collins, Northwestern Uniersity Ursula Wolz, The College of New Jersey Joshua Danish, Indiana Uniersity Committee respondent: Yasmin Kafai 2:15-2:30 PM Break 2:30-4:30 PM Discussion and Wrap-up • ommittee members summarize their individual C reactions • loor opened to other workshop participants F 4:30 PM Adjourn