10:30-12:15 PM

Panel 2—Computational Thinking Everywhere (Part I)

  • What kinds of problems require computational thinking? What are some examples?

  • How, if at all, does computational thinking vary by discipline? What would be the nature of computational thinking for physicists, biologists, engineers, lawyers, physicians, historians, sociologists, teachers, accountants, homemakers, bus drivers, and so on?

  • What are the exposures and experiences needed to develop the level of computational thinking needed in various disciplines?

  • What are contemporary issues facing the nation that would benefit from greater development of computational thinking?

  • What is the value of computational thinking for nonscientists?

  • How, if at all, would widespread facility with computational thinking enhance the productivity of U.S. workers?

  • How do we best illustrate the power of computational thinking?

Presenters:

Kevin Ashley, University of Pittsburgh

Chris Hoffmann, Purdue University

Alan Kay, Viewpoints Research Institute, Inc.

Richard Lipton, Georgia Tech

Robert Sproull, Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Committee respondent: M. Brian Blake

12:15-1:15 PM

Working Lunch—Other Related Ongoing Efforts

Andrew Bernat: CRA Education Committee

Peter Denning: Great Principles of Computing (via video-conference)



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