C
Executive Summary from Being Fluent with Information Technology

Information technology is playing an increasingly important role in the work and personal lives of citizens. Computers, communications, digital information, software—the constituents of the information age— are everywhere.

Between those who search aggressively for opportunities to learn more about information technology and those who choose not to learn anything at all about information technology, there are many who recognize the potential value of information technology for their everyday lives and who realize that a better understanding of information technology will be helpful to them. This realization is based on several factors:

  • Information technology has entered our lives over a relatively brief period of time with little warning and essentially no formal educational preparation for most people.

  • Many who currently use information technology have only a limited understanding of the tools they use and a (probably correct) belief that they are underutilizing them.

  • Many citizens do not feel confident or in control when confronted by information technology, and they would like to be more certain of themselves.

  • There have been impressive claims for the potential benefits of information technology, and many would like to realize those benefits.

NOTE: Reprinted from National Research Council, 1999, Being Fluent with Information Technology, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, pp. 1-5.



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C Executive Summary from Being Fluent with Information Technology Information technology is playing an increasingly important role in the work and personal lives of citizens. Computers, communications, digital information, software—the constituents of the information age— are everywhere. Between those who search aggressively for opportunities to learn more about information technology and those who choose not to learn anything at all about information technology, there are many who recognize the potential value of information technology for their everyday lives and who realize that a better understanding of information technology will be helpful to them. This realization is based on several factors: • Information technology has entered our lives over a relatively brief period of time with little warning and essentially no formal educational preparation for most people. • Many who currently use information technology have only a lim- ited understanding of the tools they use and a (probably correct) belief that they are underutilizing them. • Many citizens do not feel confident or in control when confronted by information technology, and they would like to be more certain of themselves. • There have been impressive claims for the potential benefits of information technology, and many would like to realize those benefits. NOTE: Reprinted from National Research Council, 1999, Being Fluent with Information Tech- nology, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, pp. 1-5. 

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 APPENDIX C • There is concern on the part of some citizens that changes implied by information technology embody potential risks to social values, free - doms or economic interests, etc., obligating them to become informed. And, naturally, there is simple curiosity about how this powerful and pervasive technology works. These various motivations to learn more about information tech- nology raise the general question, What should everyone know about information technology in order to use it more effectively now and in the future? Addressing that question is the subject of this report. The answer to this question is complicated by the fact that informa- tion technology is changing rapidly. The electronic computer is just over 50 years old, “PC,” as in personal computer, is less than 20 years old, and the World Wide Web has been known to the public for less than five years. In the presence of rapid change, it is impossible to give a fixed, once-and-for-all course that will remain current and effective. Generally, “computer literacy” has acquired a “skills” connotation, implying competency with a few of today’s computer applications, such as word processing and e-mail. Literacy is too modest a goal in the pres- ence of rapid change, because it lacks the necessary “staying power.” As the technology changes by leaps and bounds, existing skills become antiquated and there is no migration path to new skills. A better solution is for the individual to plan to adapt to changes in the technology. This involves learning sufficient foundational material to enable one to acquire new skills independently after one’s formal education is complete. This requirement of a deeper understanding than is implied by the rudimentary term “computer literacy” motivated the committee to adopt “fluency” as a term connoting a higher level of competency. People fluent with information technology (FIT persons) are able to express themselves creatively, to reformulate knowledge, and to synthesize new information. Fluency with information technology (i.e., what this report calls FITness) entails a process of lifelong learning in which individuals continually apply what they know to adapt to change and acquire more knowledge to be more effective at applying information technology to their work and personal lives. Fluency with information technology requires three kinds of knowl- edge: contemporary skills, foundational concepts, and intellectual capa - bilities. These three kinds of knowledge prepare a person in different ways for FITness. • Contemporary skills, the ability to use today’s computer applica - tions, enable people to apply information technology immediately. In the present labor market, skills are an essential component of job readiness. Most importantly, skills provide a store of practical experience on which to build new competence. • Foundational concepts, the basic principles and ideas of com- puters, networks, and information, underpin the technology. Concepts

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 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON COMPUTATIONAL THINKING explain the how and why of information technology, and they give insight into its opportunities and limitations. Concepts are the raw mate - rial for understanding new information technology as it evolves. • Intellectual capabilities, the ability to apply information technology in complex and sustained situations, encapsulate higher-level thinking in the context of information technology. Capabilities empower people to manipulate the medium to their advantage and to handle unintended and unexpected problems when they arise. The intellectual capabilities foster more abstract thinking about information and its manipulation. For specificity, the report enumerates the ten highest-priority items for each of the three types of knowledge. (Box ES.1 lists these ten items for each type of knowledge.) The skills, linked closely to today’s computer usage, will change over time, but the concepts and capabili - ties are timeless. Concepts, capabilities, and skills—the three different types of knowl- edge of FITness—occupy separate dimensions, implying that a particular activity involving information technology will involve elements of each type of knowledge. Learning the skills and concepts and developing the intellectual capabilities can be undertaken without reference to each other, but such an effort will not promote FITness to any significant degree. The three elements of FITness are co-equal, each reinforcing the others, and all are essential to FITness. FITness is personal in the sense that individuals fluent with informa- tion technology evaluate, distinguish, learn, and use new information technology as appropriate to their own personal and professional activi - ties. What is appropriate for an individual depends on the particular applications, activities, and opportunities for being FIT that are associ - ated with the individual’s area of interest or specialization. FITness is also graduated and dynamic. It is graduated in the sense that FITness is characterized by different levels of sophistication (rather than a single fluent/not fluent judgment). And, it is dynamic in that FITness entails lifelong learning as information technology evolves. In short, FITness should not be regarded as an end state that is inde - pendent of domain, but rather as something that develops over a lifetime in particular domains of interest and that has a different character and tone depending on which domains are involved. Accordingly, the peda - gogic goal is to provide students with a sufficiently complete foundation of the three types of knowledge that they can “learn the rest of it” on their own as the need arises throughout life. Because FITness is fundamentally integrative, calling upon an indi- vidual to coordinate information and skills with respect to multiple dimensions of a problem and to make overall judgments and decisions taking all such information into account, a project-based approach to developing FITness is most appropriate. Projects of appropriate scale and scope inherently involve multiple iterations, each of which provides an opportunity for an instructional checkpoint or intervention. The domain

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 APPENDIX C BOX ES.1 The Components of Fluency with Information Technology Intellectual Capabilities   1. Engage in sustained reasoning.    2. Manage complexity.   3. Test a solution.   4. Manage problems in faulty solutions.   5. Organize and navigate information structures and evaluate information.   6. Collaborate.   7. Communicate to other audiences.   8. Expect the unexpected.   9. Anticipate changing technologies. 10. Think about information technology abstractly. Information Technology Concepts   1. Computers    2. Information systems   3. Networks   4. Digital representation of information   5. Information organization   6. Modeling and abstraction   7. Algorithmic thinking and programming   8. Universality    9. Limitations of information technology 10. Societal impact of information and information technology Information Technology Skills   1. Setting up a personal computer   2. Using basic operating system features    3. Using a word processor to create a text document   4.   sing a graphics and/or an artwork package to create illustrations, slides,  U or other image-based expressions of ideas   5. Connecting a computer to a network   6. Using the Internet to find information and resources   7. Using a computer to communicate with others   8. Using a spreadsheet to model simple processes or financial tables   9. Using a database system to set up and access useful information  10.   sing  instructional  materials  to  learn  how  to  use  new  applications  or  U f  eatures

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 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON COMPUTATIONAL THINKING of a project can be tailored to an individual’s interest (e.g., in the depart - ment of a student’s major), thereby providing motivation for a person to expend the (non-trivial) effort to master the concepts and skills of FITness. In addition, a project of appropriate scope will be sufficiently complex that intellectual integration is necessary to complete it. Note also that much of the infrastructure of existing skills-based computer or information technology literacy efforts (e.g., hardware, software, net - work connections, support staff) will be important elements of efforts to promote FITness. Although the essentials of FITness are for the most part not depen - dent on sophisticated mathematics, and should therefore generally be accessible in some form to every citizen, any program or effort to make individuals more FIT must be customized to the target population. Because the committee was composed of college and university faculty, the committee chose to focus its implementational concerns on the four- year college or university graduate as one important starting point for the development of FITness across the citizenry. Further, the commit - tee believes that successful implementation of FITness instruction will requires serious rethinking of the college and university curriculum. It will not be sufficient for individual instructors to revisit their course con- tent or approach. Rather, entire departments must examine the question of the extent to which their students will graduate FIT. Universities need to concern themselves with the FITness of students who cross discipline boundaries and with the extent to which each discipline is meeting the goals of universal FITness. In summary, FIT individuals, those who know a starter set of IT skills, who understand the basic concepts on which IT is founded, and who have engaged in the higher-level thinking embodied in the intellectual capabilities, should use information technology confidently, should come to work ready to learn new business systems quickly and use them effec- tively, should be able to apply IT to personally relevant problems, and should be able to adapt to the inevitable change as IT evolves over their lifetime. To be FIT is to possess knowledge essential to using information technology now and in the future.