FIGURE 4.2 Arecibo (A) and Goldstone (G) radar images of near-Earth asteroid 1999 JM8. Illumination is from the top; range increases downward, and the wavelength of the echoes of the radio waves increases to the left. This asteroid is a very slow rotator, with a period of about a week. Each panel corresponds to a sum of images from the referenced 1999 August date. With a diameter of about 7 kilometers, 1999 JM8 is among the largest known near-Earth asteroids. SOURCE: L.A.M. Benner, S.J. Ostro, M.C. Nolan, J.-L. Margot, J.D. Giorgini, R.S. Hudson, R.F. Jurgens, M.A. Slade, E.S. Howell, D.B. Campbell, and D.K. Yeomans, 2000, Radar observations of asteroid 1999 JM8, Meteoritics and Planetary Science 37:779-792. Copyright 2002 by the Meteoritical Society.

FIGURE 4.2 Arecibo (A) and Goldstone (G) radar images of near-Earth asteroid 1999 JM8. Illumination is from the top; range increases downward, and the wavelength of the echoes of the radio waves increases to the left. This asteroid is a very slow rotator, with a period of about a week. Each panel corresponds to a sum of images from the referenced 1999 August date. With a diameter of about 7 kilometers, 1999 JM8 is among the largest known near-Earth asteroids. SOURCE: L.A.M. Benner, S.J. Ostro, M.C. Nolan, J.-L. Margot, J.D. Giorgini, R.S. Hudson, R.F. Jurgens, M.A. Slade, E.S. Howell, D.B. Campbell, and D.K. Yeomans, 2000, Radar observations of asteroid 1999 JM8, Meteoritics and Planetary Science 37:779-792. Copyright 2002 by the Meteoritical Society.



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