FIGURE 5-16 Drag coefficient for aerodynamic tractor with single or double trailers. SOURCE: Cooper (2004), p. 17. Reprinted with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media.

FIGURE 5-16 Drag coefficient for aerodynamic tractor with single or double trailers. SOURCE: Cooper (2004), p. 17. Reprinted with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media.

and fuel consumption results bolster arguments that favor the increased use of long combination vehicles (LCVs), as perhaps the most cost-effective vehicle design feature available to reduce fuel consumption in the heavy-duty truck industry.

Laydon Composites Ltd. has recently completed scalemodel wind tunnel tests on double 28-ft trailers equipped with forward-looking skirts, plus a vortex generator on the trailer’s faces. These skirts included trailer and tractor axle skirts. The fuel consumption reduction of the combination shown in Figure 5-17 is 9.9 percent at 60 mph, compared to a standard 28-ft double vehicle configuration. These results are based on yaw averaged and weighted winds, using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration procedure for estimating consumption from the drag results.

Aerodynamics of Trailers Other Than Dry Vans

While the dry van constitutes the largest portion of body styles in the U.S. fleet of trailers, there is a proliferation of

FIGURE 5-17 Laydon double trailer arrangement with trailer skirts and vortex stabilizers on both trailers; SOURCE: Courtesy of Laydon Composites.

FIGURE 5-17 Laydon double trailer arrangement with trailer skirts and vortex stabilizers on both trailers; SOURCE: Courtesy of Laydon Composites.



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