TABLE 2-5 Top 10 Motor Coach Operators, 2008, United States and Canada

SOURCE: Metro Magazine (2009), p. 24.

TABLE 2-6 Medium- and Heavy-Duty-Vehicle Sales by Calendar Year

Vehicle Class

Calendar Year

Percent Change, 2004-2008

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Class 3

136,229

146,809

115,140

156,610

99,692

−27

Class 4

36,203

36,812

31,471

35,293

21,420

−41

Class 5

26,058

37,359

33,757

34,478

27,558

6

Class 6

67,252

55,666

68,069

46,158

27,977

−58

Class 7

61,918

71,305

78,754

54,761

44,943

−27

Class 8

194,827

253,840

274,480

137,016

127,880

−34

TOTAL Sales

522,487

601,791

601,671

464,316

349,470

−33

SOURCE: DOE/EERE (2009), p. 20, based on Ward’s Motor Vehicle Facts and Figures, available at http://www.wardsauto.com/about/factsfigures.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) city-highway dynamometer test procedures.1

The terms fuel economy and fuel consumption are both used to show the efficiency of how fuel is used in vehicles. These terms need to be defined.

  • Fuel economy is a measure of how far a vehicle will go with a gallon of fuel and is expressed in miles per gallon (mpg). This is the term used by consumers, manufacturers, and regulators to communicate with the public in North America.

  • Fuel consumption is the inverse measure—the amount of fuel consumed in driving a given distance—and is measured in units such as gallons per 100 miles or liters per kilometer. Fuel consumption is a fundamental engineering measure and is useful because it is related directly to the goal of decreasing the amount of fuel required to travel a given distance.

1

A dynamometer is a machine used to simulate the forces on a drive train to test pollutant emissions, fuel consumption, and other operating characteristics of a vehicle or an engine under controlled and repeatable circumstances.



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