BOX 10-1
Patient-Anchored Care: Common Themes

  • Listening. Each patient-clinician interaction starts with uninterrupted attention to the patient’s voice on issues, perspectives, goals, and preferences.
  • Participatory. Health outcomes improve when patients are engaged in their own care.
  • Reliable. All patients should expect proven best practice as the starting point in their care.
  • Personalized. With proven best practice as the starting point, science-based tailoring is informed by personal biological traits, circumstances, and preferences.
  • Seamless. Care delivered by multiple providers in multiple settings should be fully integrated and seamless.
  • Efficient. Patients, their families, and clinicians should expect care to be appropriate to the need, available resources, and time required.
  • Accountable. All relevant aspects of the clinical experience, including patient perspectives, should be captured and routinely assessed against expectations.
  • Trustworthy. Patients should expect a strong and secure foundation of trust on all dimensions—safety, quality, security, efficiency, accountability, and equity.
  • Transparent. Information on the outcomes of care—both effectiveness and efficiency—should be readily accessible and understandable to patients and their families.
  • Learning. In a learning health system, the patient is an active contributor to and supporter of the learning process.

tion to the patient’s voice on issues, perspectives, goals, and preferences. These patient views should then be used to guide clinical decisions, which often involve choices among multiple treatments that have both benefits and risks. Workshop participants reported that care often improved when staff and providers listened carefully to the concerns of patients and their families. Yet, it has been noted that physicians tend to interrupt patients within about 15 seconds of beginning to speak at the outset of the visit. On the other hand, an uninterrupted patient tends to conclude their remarks in under a minute (Beckman and Frankel, 1984). Listening fully to the patient, then, does not cause any significant delays in the physician’s schedule, and adds substantially to creating an environment where patients feel comfortable sharing their health information. Achieving this goal will require a new focus on patient communication starting early in provider education to ensure that providers have the tools they need to share complex health information with patients and help them with these decisions.

Participatory. Health outcomes improve when patients are engaged in their own care. In addition to improving health outcomes and patient adherence,



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