Appendix A
Agenda

THE GRAND CHALLENGES OF OUR AGING SOCIETY: A SYMPOSIUM

THURSDAY, MAY 28

8:30–9:00 a.m.

Welcome and Background

 

Ronald Lee, University of California, Berkeley, Chair of Symposium Planning Committee

9:00–10:45 a.m.

How can biological research, medical advances, and ethical considerations inform health care decisions?

 

Health span and life span—Richard Miller, University of Michigan

Frailty—Linda Fried, Columbia University

Judicious use of resources—David Reuben, University of California, Los Angeles

 

Discussion/Q&A

10:45–11:00 a.m.

Break

11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

What steps can individuals and society undertake to enhance healthy aging?

 

An introduction to health promotion—Robert Butler, International Longevity Center



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Appendix A Agenda THE GRAND CHALLENGES OF OuR AGING SOCIETY: A SYMPOSIuM THURSDAY, MAY  8:30–9:00 a.m. Welcome and Background Ronald Lee, University of California, Berkeley, Chair of Symposium Planning Committee 9:00–10:45 a.m. How can biological research, medical advances, and ethical considerations inform health care decisions? Health span and life span—Richard Miller, University of Michigan Frailty—Linda Fried, Columbia University Judicious use of resources—Daid Reuben, University of California, Los Angeles Discussion/Q&A 10:45–11:00 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m.– What steps can individuals and society undertake to 12:30 p.m. enhance healthy aging? An introduction to health promotion—Robert Butler, International Longevity Center 

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 GRAND CHALLENGES OF OUR AGING SOCIETY Exercise and cognition—Arthur Kramer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Racial disparities and communication—M. Chris Gibbons, Johns Hopkins University Obesity in older persons—Gordon L. Jensen, Pennsylvania State University Discussion/Q&A 12:30–1:15 p.m. Lunch 1:15–3:00 p.m. What will be the macroeconomic and financial impacts of an aging society? General macroeconomic impact—Axel Börsch-Supan, Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging Financial impact—Robin Brooks, Brevan Howard Asset Management, LLP International perspective—Daid Canning, Harvard University Discussion/Q&A 3:00–3:15 p.m. Break 3:15–5:00 p.m. How will income security and health care financing programs be affected by the aging of the population, and how should they be changed? Income security—Alicia Munnell, Boston College Health and long-term care—Kenneth Langa, University of Michigan International perspective—Andrew Mason, University of Hawaii at Manoa Discussion/Q&A 5:00–6:00 p.m. Reception—The Great Hall

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 APPENDIX A FRIDAY, MAY  8:30–8:45 a.m. Welcome and Overview of Day Ronald Lee, University of California, Berkeley, Chair of Symposium Planning Committee 8:45–10:30 a.m. Will our institutions and policies permit sufficient flexibility in the timing of major life activities as life span increases? Social perspective—Phyllis Moen, University of Minnesota Economic perspective—Richard Burkhauser, Cornell University Discussion/Q&A 10:30–10:45 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m.– In what ways will our communities be affected by an 12:15 p.m. aging society and how should they respond? Social perspective—Sandra Rosenbloom, University of Arizona Physical perspective—Joseph Coughlin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Discussion/Q&A 12:15–1:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00–2:30 p.m. Summary Discussion: What topics would benefit from studies conducted by the National Academies? • Robert Binstock, Case Western Reserve University • Robert Butler, International Longevity Center • James Jackson, University of Michigan • Barbara Torrey, Population Reference Bureau • xel Börsch-Supan, Mannheim Research Institute for A the Economics of Aging 2:30 p.m. Adjourn

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