Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members and Presenters

Robert H. Binstock (Planning Committee Member/Presenter) is professor of aging, health, and society at Case Western Reserve University. His primary appointment is in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the School of Medicine; he holds secondary appointments in the departments of Bioethics, Medicine, Political Science, and Sociology and in the School of Nursing. He has served as president of the Gerontological Society of America, director of a White House Task Force on Older Americans, and chairman and member of a number of advisory panels to federal, state, and local governments and foundations. He has published numerous articles, book chapters, monographs, and books, most of them dealing with politics and policies affecting aging. He has A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Harvard University.


Axel H. Börsch-Supan (Presenter) is the founding director of the Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging and professor of macroeconomics and public policy at the University of Mannheim. Previously he was assistant professor in the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, then taught at both Dortmund and Dresden University in Germany before joining Mannheim. He has published widely on topics of applied econometrics, household saving, housing demand, retirement decisions, and the economic implications of aging. He is a member of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Academy of Sciences in Berlin-Brandenburg. He has a diploma in mathematics from the University of Bonn and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members and Presenters Robert H. Binstock (Planning Committee Member/Presenter) is professor of aging, health, and society at Case Western Reserve University. His primary appointment is in the Department of Epidemiology and Biosta- tistics in the School of Medicine; he holds secondary appointments in the departments of Bioethics, Medicine, Political Science, and Sociology and in the School of Nursing. He has served as president of the Gerontologi - cal Society of America, director of a White House Task Force on Older Americans, and chairman and member of a number of advisory panels to federal, state, and local governments and foundations. He has published numerous articles, book chapters, monographs, and books, most of them dealing with politics and policies affecting aging. He has A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Harvard University. Axel H. Börsch-Supan (Presenter) is the founding director of the Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging and professor of macroeco - nomics and public policy at the University of Mannheim. Previously he was assistant professor in the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, then taught at both Dortmund and Dresden Uni- versity in Germany before joining Mannheim. He has published widely on topics of applied econometrics, household saving, housing demand, retirement decisions, and the economic implications of aging. He is a member of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Academy of Sciences in Berlin-Brandenburg. He has a diploma in mathematics from the University of Bonn and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

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0 GRAND CHALLENGES OF OUR AGING SOCIETY Robin Brooks (Presenter) is an economist and foreign exchange strategist at Brevan Howard Asset Management, LLP, a macro hedge fund. Previ- ously he was a Brookings Institution research fellow. Before joining the International Monetary Fund as an economist, he worked in the Research Department, specializing in exchange rate misalignments, and in the Asia Pacific Department, where he worked on the countries of Philippines and Singapore. Earlier he was a vice president with Goldman Sachs Asset Management in New York. He has an undergraduate degree in monetary economics from the London School of Economics and a Ph.D. in econom- ics from Yale University. Richard V. Burkhauser (Presenter) is the Sarah Gibson Blanding profes- sor of policy analysis in the Department of Policy Analysis and Manage- ment and professor of economics at Cornell University. He has published widely on the behavioral and distributional consequences of public poli - cies targeted on vulnerable populations. He is the 2009 president-elect of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Robert N. Butler (Planning Committee Member/Presenter) is president and chief executive officer of the International Longevity Center and profes - sor of geriatrics and adult development in the Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development at Mount Sinai Medical Center. As a physician, gerontologist, psychiatrist, public servant, and Pulitzer Prize–winning author, he has long been involved in a broad array of social and health issues. He is an advocate for the medical and social needs and rights of the elderly and conducts research on healthy aging and the dementias. He has a B.A. from Columbia College and an M.D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Judith Campisi (Planning Committee Member) is a senior staff scientist in the Cell and Molecular Biology Department of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Previously she was assistant and associate profes- sor in biochemistry at the Boston University Medical School. Bridging the fields of cancer and aging, her work includes contributions to under- standing the evolution and mechanisms of tumor suppression, the cellular damage responses of senescence and apoptosis, DNA repair mechanisms, telomere biology, and the role of genome maintenance systems in post - poning aging and cancer. She has published numerous scholarly papers and has received several awards for her research. She has a Ph.D. from the State University of New York and did postdoctoral training at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

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 APPENDIX C David Canning (Presenter) is deputy director of the Program on the Global Demography of Aging and heads the economics track of the doctoral program in population and international health in the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on the role of demographic change and health improvements in economic development. Specifically, his research on demographic change focuses on the effect of changes in age structure on aggregate economic activity, as well as the effect of changes in longevity on economic behavior. In terms of health, his research focuses on health as a form of human capital and its effect on worker productiv- ity. He has a B.A. in economics and mathematics from Queen’s University Belfast and a Ph.D. in economics from Cambridge University. Laura Carstensen (Planning Committee Member) is a licensed clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Stanford University. Her research focuses on motivational and emotional changes in adulthood. Most recently, she has published research showing the ways in which motivational changes influence cognitive processing in older adults. In collaboration with Alan Garber, she is studying motivational influences on medical decision making. She is chair of the External Scientific Advi- sory Committee for the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin and, at the National Research Council, chaired the Committee on Aging Frontiers in Social Psychology, Personality, and Adult Develop - mental Psychology. In 2003, she was selected as a Guggenheim fellow. She has a B.S. from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from West Virginia University. Joseph F. Coughlin (Planning Committee Member/Presenter) is founder and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab. It is the first multidisciplinary research program created to understand the behavior of the population over age 45, the role of technology, and the opportu- nity for innovations to improve the quality of life of older adults and their families. His own research focuses on how the convergence of baby boomer expectations and technology will shape the future of public policy and drive innovation across global industries—including the financial services, insurance, health, information technology, telecommunications, automobile, and retail sectors. In February 2008, the Wall Street Journal named him one of America’s 12 pioneers inventing the future of retire - ment and aging. He has a Ph.D. from Boston University, an A.M. from Brown University, and a B.A. from the State University of New York. Eileen Crimmins (Planning Committee Member) is associate dean of the Davis School of Gerontology and the Edna M. Jones professor of ger- ontology and sociology at the University of Southern California. Her

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 GRAND CHALLENGES OF OUR AGING SOCIETY research interests focus on the demography of older populations, health, and mortality. Her research projects include one on the role of biological factors in determining differences in health by education and income level and another on healthy life expectancy in the older population. In addi - tion, she is working on male-female differences in health and mortality as well as differences by gender in life stresses and strains. Crimmins is the director of the Center on Biodemography and Population Health. She has a B.A. in mathematics from Chestnut Hill College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in demography from the University of Pennsylvania. Linda P. Fried (Presenter) is dean, DeLamar professor of public health, and professor of epidemiology in the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. She is also professor of medicine at Columbia’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. An expert in the fields of epidemiol- ogy and geriatrics, she has dedicated her career to the science of healthy aging, especially the prevention of frailty and disability. She conducts clinical and population-based research that focuses on health for an aging population, especially the causes, prevention, and care of chronic diseases and resulting disability and frailty in older adults. She has an M.D. from Rush Medical College and an M.P.H. from the School of Hygiene and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. M. Chris Gibbons (Presenter) is associate director of the Urban Health Institute and assistant professor in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. He works primarily in the area of consumer health informatics, focusing on using health information and communications technologies to improve urban health care disparities. He is an adviser and expert consultant to several state and federal agen - cies and policy makers in the areas of urban health, e-health, minority health, and health care disparities. At the National Research Council, he is a member of the Committee on the Role of Human Factors in Home Health Care. He has an M.D. from the University of Alabama and an M.P.H. in health promotion among urban and disadvantaged populations from Johns Hopkins University. Robert M. Hauser (Planning Committee Member) is Vilas research profes- sor of sociology and director of the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research has included sociology and demography, aging and the life course, social and economic inequality, stratification and mobility, and cross-national and cross-temporal comparisons of intergenerational mobility. Since 1980, he has led the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) and published dozens of reports based on its data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Asso-

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 APPENDIX C ciation and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the Panel on Institutional Review Boards, Surveys, and Social Science Research and the Panel to Review the Statistical Procedures for the Decennial Census. He has a B.A. in economics from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, both in sociology, from the University of Michigan. James S. Jackson (Planning Committee Member/Presenter) is professor of psychology, health behavior, and health education in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan, where he also is director of the Insti- tute for Social Research. He studies immigration, race and ethnic relations, physical and mental health, adult development and aging, attitudes and attitude change, and black American politics. He directs the National Sur- vey of American Life, a survey designed to document the physical, emo - tional, mental, structural, and economic conditions of black Americans. He serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute on Aging. He has a B.S. in psychology from Michigan State University, an M.A. in psychology from the University of Toledo, and a Ph.D. in social psychology from Wayne State University. Gordon L. Jensen (Presenter) is professor and head of nutritional sciences at the Pennsylvania State University. He is also professor of medicine at the Hershey Medical Center and a specialist in nutrition with Centre Medical and Surgical Associates at the Mt. Nittany Medical Center. His research interests have focused largely on geriatric nutrition concerns, including nutrition screening and assessment for older persons and the impact of obesity on functional and health outcomes. He is past president of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and past chair of the Medical Nutrition Council of the American Society for Nutri - tion. At the National Academies, he is a current member of the Food and Nutrition Board. He has an M.D. from Cornell University Medical College and a Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from Cornell University. Arthur Kramer (Presenter) is Swanlund chair and professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Illinois. His research projects include topics in cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, aging, and human factors. A major focus of his lab’s recent research is the understanding and enhancement of cognitive and neural plasticity across the life span. He is the director of the Biomedical Imaging Center at the University of Illinois and Zukunftskolleg senior fellow at the University of Konstanz in Germany. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society, a member of the executive com - mittee of the International Society of Attention and Performance, and a

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 GRAND CHALLENGES OF OUR AGING SOCIETY recent recipient of a Ten Year MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Committee on Human-Systems Integration. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive/ experimental psychology from the University of Illinois. Kenneth Langa (Presenter) is associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, a research investigator in the Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service Center of Excellence, a fac- ulty associate in the Institute for Social Research, and an associate direc - tor of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Michigan. He is a coinvestigator for the Health and Retirement Study and the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study. His research focuses on the epidemi- ology and costs of chronic disease in older adults, with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. He is currently focusing on the relationship of cardiovascular risk factors to cognitive decline and demen- tia in middle-aged and older adults. He has M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in public policy from the University of Chicago. He is a practicing general internist treating adult patients with chronic medical conditions. Ronald Lee (Planning Committee Chair/Presenter) is director of the Center for the Demography of Aging and Economics at the University of Cali - fornia, Berkeley. His current research topics include modeling and fore- casting demographic time series, the evolutionary theory of life histories, population aging, Social Security, and intergenerational transfers. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a corresponding member of the British Academy. He has chaired the population and social science study section for the National Institutes of Health and served on the National Advisory Committee on Aging (NIA Council). At the National Research Council, he chaired the Committee on Population. He has an M.A. in demography from the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Charles M. Lucas (Planning Committee Member) is a consultant with Osprey Point Consulting. He is the former global head of market risk management at AIG Corporation, a financial services firm, where he headed its quantitative finance group. Prior to joining AIG, he was at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, from which he retired as a senior vice president; while there he created and managed the organization’s capital markets unit. He has a B.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

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 APPENDIX C Andrew Mason (Presenter) is professor of economics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and senior fellow at the East-West Center in Honolulu. He is a member of the Center for the Economics and Demography of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley. He codirects the National Transfer Accounts Project (http://www.ntaccounts.org), an international project involving researchers from more than 25 countries developing a comprehensive approach to measuring and studying the systems coun- tries use to meet the economic needs of children and the elderly. National transfer accounts are being used to study the evolution of familial support systems, public pensions, health care, and education systems and their influence on economic growth, generational equity, and other features of the macroeconomy. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Richard A. Miller (Presenter) is professor of pathology and associate director of the Geriatrics Center at the University of Michigan. He is also a research scientist at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center. His main research interests are in the genetic and immunobiological aspects of aging. His laboratory works on topics ranging from biochemistry of signal transduc- tion in T cells from aged mice, studies of gene expression in long-lived mutant dwarf mice, and mapping of genes for longevity and resistance to late-life diseases, to the development of new mouse models for alterations in the rate of aging. He has served in a variety of editorial and advisory positions on behalf of the Gerontology Society of America, the American Federation for Aging Research, and the National Institute on Aging. He is the recipient of the Nathan Shock Award, the Allied Signal Award, and the Kleemeier Award for aging research. He has a B.A. from Haverford College and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University. Phyllis Moen (Presenter) is the McKnight presidential chair in sociology at the University of Minnesota. She studies occupational careers, gender, families, and well-being over the life course, including the frequently obsolete social, cultural, and policy ecologies in which lives play out. She has published numerous books, including Women’s Two Roles: A Contempo- rary Dilemma and It’s about Time: Couples and Careers. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Alicia Munnell (Presenter) is the Peter F. Drucker professor in the Carroll School of Management at Boston College and also director of the Center for Retirement Research. She has served on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (1995-1997), as assistant secretary of the U.S. Treasury for economic policy (1993-1995) and as senior vice president and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Munnell has published many articles, authored numerous books, and edited several volumes on

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 GRAND CHALLENGES OF OUR AGING SOCIETY tax policy, Social Security, public and private pensions, and productivity. Munnell was cofounder and first president of the National Academy of Social Insurance. She is currently a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Public Administration. She has a B.A. from Wellesley College, an M.A. from Boston University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. David B. Reuben (Planning Committee Member/Presenter) is director of the Multicampus Program in Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology and chief of the Division of Geriatrics in the Center for Health Sciences at the Uni - versity of California, Los Angeles. He is also the Archstone Foundation chair and professor in the David Geffen School of Medicine and director of the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. His professional interests are in clinical care, education, research, and admin- istrative aspects of geriatrics. He has won seven awards for excellence in teaching. Dr. Reuben’s current research interests include redesigning the office visit to improve health care quality and measurement of how older adults function. He is a past president of the American Geriatrics Society and the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs. He has an M.D. from Emory University School of Medicine. Sandra Rosenbloom (Presenter) is professor of planning, adjunct profes- sor of natural renewable resources, adjunct professor of gerontology, and adjunct professor of women’s studies at the University of Arizona. Her research explores the intersection between the social sciences and trans - portation, examining the implications for transportation and community development of societal trends—notably, suburbanization, the aging of society, the increased role in the labor force of women with children, and the growth of groups with special needs. At the National Research Coun- cil, she is a member of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) executive committee, chaired the Committee on Paratransit, has served on several other TRB committees and task forces, received the 2004 TRB Roy W. Crum distinguished service award, and was named a national associate of the National Academies. She has a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree in public policy, and a Ph.D. in political science, all from the University of California, Los Angeles. Barbara Boyle Torrey (Presenter) is a visiting scholar at the Population Ref- erence Bureau. Previously she served as executive director of the National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Edu - cation and the Census Bureau’s Center for International Research. Her areas of expertise include demography, international policy, population vulnerabilities, and comparative economics. She has been the principal

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 APPENDIX C investigator on several population dynamics and population/economic studies. She is a member of the board of the Population Reference Bureau and the science committee of the International Institute for Applied Sys - tems Analysis near Vienna, Austria. At the National Research Council, she serves on the International Advisory Board. She has B.A. and M.S. degrees in international relations from Stanford University. David R. Weir (Planning Committee Member) is research professor in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research at the Uni - versity of Michigan and director of the Health and Retirement Study. Previously he was visiting associate professor in the Department of Eco- nomics and research associate in the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. His current research interests include the use of longitudinal data to study chronic disease processes, especially diabetes; health care decision making at older ages, including Medicare Part D; how couples jointly plan for risks of old age, including retirement, widow- hood, and disability; the role of personality factors in lifetime economic success; and the use of biomarkers in population surveys. He is the recipi - ent of a Special Emphasis Research Career Award in the Economics and Demography of Aging from the National Institute on Aging. He has an A.B. in history from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.

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