C
Committee and Guest Speaker Information

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Ned D. Heindel (Chair) is H. S. Bunn Chair and Professor of Chemistry at Lehigh University. He joined Lehigh University in 1966. Dr. Heindel’s research has focused mainly on the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals and synthesis of useful therapeutic drug candidates. He is working on countermeasures for sulfur mustard vesicant. Dr. Heindel has 11 patents, four of which have been licensed. In 1994 he served as the president of the American Chemical Society. Dr. Heindel earned his B.S. at Lebanon Valley College in 1959 (chemistry and mathematics) and his Ph.D. at the University of Delaware in l963 (organic chemistry), and he held a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University in l964 (medicinal chemistry).


Charles Barton is an independent consultant. His expertise includes cause–effect and dose–response relationships. He was until recently a senior scientist at XOMA (US) LLC, in Berkeley, California, where he oversaw preclinical studies to determine the toxicity and safety of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Before joining XOMA, Dr. Barton was the state toxicologist for Iowa. He has served on the faculties of Iowa State University and Des Moines University Osteopathic Medical Center. Dr. Barton received his Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of Louisiana. In addition to being a board-certified toxicologist, he is certified in conducting public health assessments, health education activities, and risk assessments; emergency response to terrorism and emergency response incident command; and hazardous waste operations and emergency response.



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C Committee and Guest Speaker Information COMMITTEE MEMBERS Ned D. Heindel (Chair) is H. S. Bunn Chair and Professor of Chemistry at Lehigh University. He joined Lehigh University in 1966. Dr. Heindel’s research has focused mainly on the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals and synthesis of useful therapeutic drug candidates. He is working on countermeasures for sulfur mustard vesicant. Dr. Heindel has 11 patents, four of which have been licensed. In 1994 he served as the president of the American Chemical Society. Dr. Heindel earned his B.S. at Lebanon Valley College in 1959 (chemistry and mathematics) and his Ph.D. at the Univer- sity of Delaware in l963 (organic chemistry), and he held a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University in l964 (medicinal chemistry). Charles Barton is an independent consultant. His expertise includes cause– effect and dose–response relationships. He was until recently a senior scientist at XOMA (US) LLC, in Berkeley, California, where he oversaw preclinical studies to determine the toxicity and safety of therapeutic mono- clonal antibodies. Before joining XOMA, Dr. Barton was the state toxicolo- gist for Iowa. He has served on the faculties of Iowa State University and Des Moines University Osteopathic Medical Center. Dr. Barton received his Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of Louisiana. In addition to being a board-certified toxicologist, he is certified in conducting public health assessments, health education activities, and risk assessments; emergency response to terrorism and emergency response incident command; and hazardous waste operations and emergency response. 

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 APPENDIX C Janet S. Baum has focused her professional career on complex R&D facili- ties for medical, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and academic clients. Her specialized expertise includes planning for animal facilities, molecular- and cellular-biology laboratories, and biosafety laboratories (to level 4). Ms. Baum works with researchers, scientists, facilities staff, health and safety personnel, and administrators to understand “big picture” objectives, cre- ate consensus, and develop project requirements through understanding of scientific processes and functions. Ms. Baum teaches at the Harvard University School of Public Health and Washington University in St. Louis. She is widely published on laboratory health and safety guidelines. She is the author or coauthor of 15 books and numerous articles. Apurba Bhattacharya is associate professor of chemistry at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Recently he held the position of senior vice president and head of global R&D in Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd. in Hyderabad, India. Dr. Bhattacharya joined the faculty of Texas A&M after many years in the pharmaceutical industry, where he started his career with Merck & Co. as a senior research chemist in process R&D. Later he joined Hoechst, where he rose to lead chemist of the Innovator Group. He then held the position of group leader in central process research at Bristol Myers Squibb until joining the faculty of Texas A&M in 1999. During his time in industry, Dr. Bhattacharya developed the synthesis of Propecia™ (hair growth drug) and Proscar™ (for benign prostatic hypertrophy). He worked on chiral Robinson annulation, and the synthesis of S-ibuprofen, D-p-hy- droxyphenyl glycine, cromolyn sodium, alkyl indanones, quinazolinones, amphoteric copolymer, and MRI imaging agents. Dr. Bhattacharya’s cur- rent research interests include designing environmentally benign, waste-free chemistry with emphasis on current industrial synthesis and processes using homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst systems and asymmetric synthe- sis, and chiral phase-transfer catalysis. Dr. Bhattacharya received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin in 1982; his M.S. in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, in 1976; and his B.S. in chemistry from Calcutta University, India, in 1974. Dr. Bhattacharya’s contributions have extended to numerous newspaper articles, 90 refereed publications, and 26 patents. Charles P. Casey (member, National Academy of Sciences) is Homer B. Adkins Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. His research lies at the interface of organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis; his group studies the mechanisms of homoge- neously catalyzed reactions. He received his B.S. from St. Louis University and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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 APPENDIX C Mark C. Cesa is a senior research associate for INEOS USA LLC. He re- ceived a Ph.D. (1979) and an M.S. (1977) in organic chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an A.B. in chemistry from Princeton University (1974). Dr. Cesa is a past chair of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). He is chair of the IUPAC Committee on Chemistry and Industry, which conducts the Safety Training Program sponsored by IUPAC, the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the U.N. International Development Organization (UNIDO). The program allows safety experts from developing countries to learn more about safety and environmental protective measures by visiting and working in plants of IUPAC company associates in the industrialized world. IUPAC, UNESCO, and UNIDO established and have maintained the Safety Training Program to promote interactions between developed countries and the developing world to dis- seminate state-of-the-art knowledge on safety and environmental protection in chemical production. M. Iqbal Choudhary is the director of the International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences and the Dr. Panjwani Center for Molecular Medi- cine and Drug Research, University of Karachi, Pakistan. Dr. Choudhary obtained his Ph.D. from the H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry in 1987 and his M.Sc. in 1983 from the University of Karachi, Pakistan, also in organic chemistry. He received his B.Sc. from the University of Karachi in chemistry, biochemistry, and botany. Dr. Choudhary is involved in academic projects, including a survey of medicinal plants in Pakistan; environmental monitoring; and capacity building in science and technology in Pakistan. Dr. Choudhary is a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, London; the American Chemical Society; the International Union of Pure and Ap- plied Chemistry; the American Society of Pharmacology; the New York Academy of Sciences; and the Federation of Asian Chemical Societies. He was awarded the Tamgha-E-Imtiaz in 1998, the Sitara-E-Imtiaz in 2001, and the Hilal-e-Imtiaz in 2006, all by the president of Pakistan. He was also awarded the Abdussalam Prize in Chemistry in 1990 and the Young Chemist Award of TWAS, the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World in 1994. Dr. Choudhary was elected a fellow of the Islamic Academy of Sciences in 2002. Robert H. Hill is a program manager with Battelle in Atlanta, GA, where he manages several contracts with the Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention (CDC). Formerly Dr. Hill worked in or managed laboratories for 30 years, and he has more than 30 years of experience in occupational and environmental health at CDC. Dr. Hill has served as member-at-large, chair of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Chemical Health and

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 APPENDIX C Safety and is an active member of the ACS Executive Committee. He also serves as liaison to the ACS Committee on Chemical Safety. He has served as member of the Board of Editors of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety since 2000. He served as the ACS representative member and later president of the National Registry of Certified Chemists. Dr. Hill received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his B.S. in chemistry from Georgia State University. He received the Howard Faw- cett Award for outstanding achievements in chemical health and safety. Robin Izzo is the associate director for laboratory safety in the Princeton University Office of Environmental Health and Safety. She has more than 20 years of experience in laboratory safety, having held positions at the University of Vermont and Harvard University before her 16-year tenure at Princeton. Ms. Izzo was instrumental in working with the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA) in developing proposed rule making to make compliance with chemical waste regulations more relevant to colleges and universities. Ms. Izzo is the chair of the coordinating committee for the EPA College and University Sector Strategy, coordinating the efforts of six national and international organizations to develop a framework for environmental compliance and sustainability programs at colleges and uni- versities. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Campus Safety Health and Environmental Management Association. Ms. Izzo holds a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Vermont and an M.S. in environmen- tal sciences from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Patrick J. Y. Lim is professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry in the University of San Carlos in Cebu City, Philippines. Through an Australian Development Cooperation scholarship, he completed his Ph.D. in chemistry (2000) at the University of Melbourne under the supervision of Charles G. Young. His doctoral work investigated novel reactions of metal and sulfur compounds with activated alkynes and produced five publications in such journals as Inorganic Chemistry and Organometallics. On returning to the Philippines, he rose in the ranks of the department, becoming chair in 2004. He was recently appointed editor of The Philip- pine Scientist, a multidisciplinary ISI journal published by the university. He serves as an accreditor of the Philippines Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities and sits on the Philippine Commission on Higher Education’s Technical Committee for Chemistry. Russell W. Phifer is the principal of WC Environmental, LLC. He has over 25 years of experience in environmental health and safety (EH&S). His background includes management of health and safety at Superfund sites, training of chemists in safety, and consulting on environmental health and

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 APPENDIX C safety issues for laboratory and industrial facilities. Mr. Phifer has received professional certification from a variety of professional organizations, and is an Occupational Safety and Health Administration authorized trainer. He has served in numerous capacities for the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is immediate past chair of the ACS Committee on Chemical Safety, and chair of the ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety. Mr. Phifer has served actively with the ACS Laboratory Chemical and Waste Management Task Force since 1981, including six years as chair. He is a member of the Board of Editors of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety. He cur- rently serves as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Prudent Practices for the Handling and Disposal of Chemicals. Mildred Solomon is vice president of the Education Development Center Inc. (EDC), an international nonprofit R&D organization of more than 1,200 professional staff, and associate clinical professor of medical ethics and anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Solomon directs the EDC Center for Applied Ethics, an interdisciplinary group of social scientists engaged in a variety of studies focusing on values questions in medicine and health care and on health system quality improvement. At Harvard, she directs the medical school’s Fellowship in Medical Ethics, a program aimed at building the bioethics capacity of Harvard-affiliated teaching hospitals. An expert in ethics education and behavioral change, Dr. Solomon has more than 30 years experience in researching, designing, and evaluating educa- tion and quality improvement programs for health professionals, health care organizations, and the public, particularly in medical uncertainty, in which values questions pose policy and practice challenges. She received her B.A. from Smith College and her doctorate from Harvard University. James M. Solyst, a principal consultant with ENVIRON, has more than 25 years of experience in advising businesses and policy leaders on the ap- plication of science in decision making and communicating science to key audiences, including regulatory and legislative bodies. Mr. Solyst is expe- rienced in product stewardship, global chemical management, emergency response, and corporate responsibility. He has assisted U.S. governors with initiatives and incidents through the National Governors Association and chemical companies responding to emerging science through the American Chemistry Council. He has also worked on international initiatives, includ- ing REACH, the U.N. Environmental Programme’s Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management, and the harmonization of global product stewardship programs. Mr. Solyst is a member of the American Chemical Society Committee on Environmental Improvement, and he is an external affiliate of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Risk Sci- ences and Public Policy Institute. He received his M.S. in city and regional

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0 APPENDIX C planning from Ohio State University and his B.A. from the University of Maryland. usha Wright is executive vice president and co-general counsel for O’Brien & Gere, an environmental engineering and consulting firm in New York. She has extensive international industry experience in chemical safety. In 2008 she retired as senior vice president for global workforce strategy at ITT Corporation, a position she had held since 2005. From 1993 to 2005 Ms. Wright was vice president and associate general counsel for ITT, with responsibility for environment, safety, and health (ES&H). Before join- ing ITT, she was executive director of environmental health and safety at Ciba Geigy Pharmaceuticals from 1977 to 1993. Ms. Wright has a B.S. in chemistry from Rutgers University, an M.S. from the University of North Carolina, and a J.D. from Rutgers University. She is a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a Certified Safety Professional. She is on the board of the Environmental Law Institute, where she is involved in conducting training in ES&H compliance in various academic institutions in India. She is also on the board of SHARE (shareafrica.org), a nongovernmental organization working in western Kenya. guEST SPEAKERS Mohammad El-Khateeb is the chairman of the Chemistry Department of the Jordan University of Science and Technology in Irbid. He has held this position since 2007, and he joined the department in 1996. Dr. El-Khateeb served as the vice dean of the Faculty of Science and Arts at the university from 2002 to 2004. He received a B.S. (1988) and an M.S. (1990) in chem- istry from Yarmouk University in Irbid, Jordan, and a Ph.D. in inorganic and organometallic chemistry from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, in 1996. He has received numerous awards, including the 2008 Abdul Hameed Shoman Award for Young Arab Researchers in chemistry and the 2004–2005 Alexander von Humboldt Scholarship at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany. He serves as the treasurer of the Jordanian Chemical Society. Temechegn Engida received a B.S. in chemistry (1988) and an M.A. in chemical education (1993) from Addis Ababa University. He received a Ph.D. in chemical education from the University of Muenster in Germany in 2000, specializing in structural chemistry education (with emphasis on the structures of solids). Since earning his B.S., Dr. Temechegn has been lectur- ing at Addis Ababa University and advising students working in chemical education at the undergraduate, master’s, and Ph.D. levels. He has been

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 APPENDIX C researching and publishing articles on chemical education. From August 2004 to February 2007, he served as the vice president of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia. During that time, he played a key role in initiating and founding the Federation of African Societies of Chemistry (FASC) in February 2006. He is now leading FASC as its founding president. He also works for the UNESCO-International Institute for Capacity Building in Africa, based in Addis Ababa. Francisco gomez works in the American Chemical Society (ACS) Office of International Activities. He is responsible for developing and implementing international alliance and partnership opportunities for ACS and fostering existing ones. Before joining ACS, Mr. Gomez worked as a consultant at G&G Consulting, advising Latin American clients on strategic planning and the development of programs aimed at maximizing organizational ef- fectiveness. Before joining G&G, Mr. Gomez served as district manager for Healthcare Services Group Inc., where he was responsible for all aspects of operations, including financial control, business development, operations, client relations, regulatory compliance, and human capital. Mr. Gomez holds a B.S. in business administration from Marshall University with a concentration in management and economics and an M.B.A. from the Kogod School of Business of American University with a concentration in international business. A native of Colombia, he is fluent in Spanish and has considerable knowledge of developing countries, having studied and worked in Latin America. Alastair Hay is a professor of environmental toxicology at the University of Leeds. He has a B.S. in chemistry (1969) and a Ph.D. in biochemistry (1973) from London University. Most of his research is on the effects of chemicals on health, and he has published many papers and articles in the scientific and medical press. Since 1989, Dr. Hay has been a member of a number of U.K. government committees that have made recommendations on the regulation of chemicals and occupational exposure standards. Dr. Hay has also worked on issues related to chemical and biologic warfare for some 30 years. Much of his work has dealt with the need for workable and international treaties that prevent the use of warfare with chemical or biologic agents. Dr. Hay recently chaired a small international working group under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons that prepared educational material for chemists on the multiple uses of chemicals, chemical warfare, and codes of conduct. Dr. Hay is a partner in a project coordinated by Environment Canada to produce protocols for cleaning surfaces after chemical- or biologic-agent contamination.

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 APPENDIX C Richard W. Niemeier is a toxicologist who has worked at the National In- stitute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for 33 years. His expe- rience includes work with the International Programme on Chemical Safety of the World Health Organization (WHO) over the last 22 years to produce more than 1,600 international chemical safety cards. He was instrumental in bringing the message of control banding from the U.K. Health and Safety Executive to NIOSH and the United States. Dr. Niemeier serves as a deputy manager for a segment of the WHO Global Collaborating Centre Network. The network has worked with South America and Mozambique in taking the control banding concept to developing countries by using the WHO toolkit. In addition, he was a member and chair of a subcommittee of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Scientific Working Group on the Fo- rensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism. For the last 11 years, Dr. Niemeier has been a member of the EPA Federal Advisory Committee on Acute Expo- sure Guideline Levels, and he was recently appointed to the EPA Integrated Risk Information System Federal Standing Science Committee. Supawan Tantayanon is the director of the Technopreneurship and Inno- vation Management and associate professor of chemistry in the Faculty of Science at Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She first joined the chem- istry department as an instructor in 1975. She is also an affiliate associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Tantayanon’s interests and expertise include re- search in organic and polymer synthesis, green chemistry, alternative energy, and educational topics in chemical safety, green chemistry, and small-scale chemistry. She received a B.S. in chemistry (1973) from Chulalongkorn Uni- versity and an M.S. in organic chemistry (1975) from Mahidol University, Thailand. She received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Worcester Poly- technic Institute in 1982 and a diploma in polymer science from Ferrara University, Italy, in 1993. Dr. Tantayanon has held numerous national and international positions, including being the president of the Pacific Polymer Federation in 2002–2003, president of the Polymer Society of Thailand in 1997–2003, director of the Green Chemistry Institute in Thailand since 2002, and president of the Chemical Society of Thailand since 2007. Dr. Tantayanon is the 2009 president-elect of the Federation of Asian Chemi- cal Societies. Khalid R. Temsamani is the national coordinator for materials science and professor of electroanalytic chemistry at the Faculty of Sciences of Tet- ouan, University of Abdelmalek Essaâdi, Morocco. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1988 from the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. He is certified in immunology and cancerology (1987). In 2008 he became di- rector of the Materials and Interfacial Systems Laboratory. Dr. Temsamani

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3 APPENDIX C is the representative of Morocco to the U.S. National Science Foundation and he recently joined Morocco’s National Biosecurity Council and the MENA Region Core Group for Biosafety and Biosecurity. He is an adviser on biosafety, biosecurity, and science ethics and served as a consultant to the U.S. National Academies to conduct a study of Morocco’s capabilities in biosafety and biosecurity. He has supervised more than 15 graduate re- search works and is author of 32 research papers and 74 international and national communications.

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