Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

John W. Farrington (Chair) is interim dean and professor in the School of Marine Science and Technology at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, and scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) with expertise in marine chemistry and geochemistry. He joined WHOI in 1971 as a postdoctoral investigator. He held successive positions in the chemistry department for 17 years and simultaneously served for six years as director of the WHOI Coastal Research Center. In 1988 he was appointed Michael P. Walsh professor and director of the Environmental Sciences Program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. In 1990, he returned to WHOI to become associate director for education and dean of graduate studies. In 2002, Farrington was named vice president for academic programs and dean at WHOI. His research interests include marine organic geochemistry, the biogeochemistry of organic chemicals of environmental concern, ocean science education, and the interaction between science and policy. He has served on committees and panels for international, national, and local organizations, including the UNESCO-Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the Lloyd Center for Environmental Studies. At the National Research Council, he has participated in seven consensus studies, chairing three of them, and has been a member of the Environmental Studies Board, the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and the Marine Board. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemistry and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island.



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff John W. Farrington (Chair) is interim dean and professor in the School of Marine Science and Technology at the University of Massachusetts, Dart- mouth, and scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) with expertise in marine chemistry and geochemistry. He joined WHOI in 1971 as a postdoctoral investigator. He held successive positions in the chemistry department for 17 years and simultaneously served for six years as director of the WHOI Coastal Research Center. In 1988 he was appointed Michael P. Walsh professor and director of the Environmental Sciences Program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. In 1990, he returned to WHOI to become associate director for education and dean of graduate studies. In 2002, Farrington was named vice president for academic programs and dean at WHOI. His research interests include marine organic geochemistry, the biogeochemistry of organic chemicals of environmental concern, ocean science education, and the interaction between science and policy. He has served on committees and panels for international, national, and local organizations, including the UNESCO- Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the Lloyd Center for Environ- mental Studies. At the National Research Council, he has participated in seven consensus studies, chairing three of them, and has been a member of the Environmental Studies Board, the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and the Marine Board. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in chem- istry and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island. 

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 NOAA’S EDUCATION PROGRAM James M. Coleman is Boyd professor at the Coastal Studies Institute of Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College. His research interests include coastal and marine processes and coastal man- agement. The training of scientists and engineers to compete in a techno- logical, global environment is central to his ongoing areas of research. At the National Research Council, he chaired the Marine Board and served as a member of the Ocean Studies Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. He has received many awards in his nearly 40-year scientific career, including the Kapitsa Medal of Honor for his contributions to the field of petroleum sciences. He has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College. Michael A. Feder (Senior Program Officer) is staff member with the Board on Science Education. He is the director the Review of NOAA Education Programs and the Roundtable on Climate Change Education, and is work- ing on study to develop a Conceptual Framework for New Science Educa- tion Standards and the review of Discipline Based Education Research. Previously, he staffed the National Research Council study of Learning Sci- ence in Informal Environments, the study of K-12 Engineering Education, and the review of NASA’s pre-college education programs. Prior to joining the National Research Council he conducted evaluations of and provided technical assistance for national, state, and local education efforts. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Applied Developmental Psychology from George Mason University. Janet Hustler is coprincipal investigator and former director of the Part- nership for Student Success in Science (PS3), a Math-Science Partnership project funded by the National Science Foundation. Located at San Jose State University, PS3 features science professional development for middle school teachers. The project provides teachers with professional develop- ment to enrich their content background and pedagogical skills, along with critical friends study groups to help teachers infuse what they learn into their practice. It also offers teacher leadership training plus coaching and summer institutes. Prior to her work at PS3, Hustler was the principal investigator and director of a similar six-year project focusing on elemen- tary science teaching and learning. Her background includes more than 20 years of classroom teaching experience and out-of-the-classroom roles, such as science coordinator for the Palo Alto Unified School District. She has served on several national boards, including the Leadership and Assistance in Science Education Reform (LASER) and the Association of Science Mate- rials Centers board, and has been a faculty member of numerous LASER institutes. At the National Research Council, she is a member of the Board

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 APPENDIX D on Science Education. Hustler has an M.A. in social sciences from San Jose State University, an M.A. in educational administration from Santa Clara University, and an M.S. in marine science education from Oregon State University. Kim A. Kastens is a Doherty senior research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and an adjunct professor of earth and environmental sciences. Her training and early career were in marine geology, focusing on the geological evolution of the Mediterranean region and the structure and tectonics of transform faults. Over the past 15 years, her focus has shifted toward improving public understanding of the Earth and the environment, through training of environmental journal- ists, professional development of teachers, innovative use of information technology, and research on the science of learning. Her educational efforts have included founding Columbia’s dual master’s degree program, Earth and Environmental Science Journalism, developing the Where Are We? software to help children learn to read maps, and developing Data Puzzles to foster use of authentic geoscience data in high schools. Her research on learning projects investigate how children use maps while navigating, how climate forecast maps and bathymetric maps are understood by their target audiences, and how people visualize a three-dimensional geological struc- ture from the limited information available from outcrops. She is currently co-leading a multidisciplinary effort to create a Synthesis of Research on Thinking and Learning in the Geosciences. Kastens has a B.S. in geology and geophysics from Yale University and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Gordon Kingsley is associate professor in the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where his teaching and research focus on science and technology policy and public management. His research exam- ines the development and implementation of effective partnerships across the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. His current research projects explore the impacts of partnerships on the development and allocation of scientific and technical human capital. This work is being conducted in three policy domains, examining the impact of educational partnerships between universities and K-12 schools on the development of math and science instructors and instruction; strategies used by state transportation agencies for effectively managing large numbers of engineering consultants and contractors; and the development of hybrid organizations and network organizations designed to stimulate technology-led economic development. He has served as a consultant or researcher for the National Science Foun- dation, the Manufacturing Extension Partnership of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of Technology Policy in the U.S.

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0 NOAA’S EDUCATION PROGRAM Department of Commerce, the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy, a science advisory board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and state-level agencies. He has a B.A. in international affairs and economics from American University, an M.S. in international affairs from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in public administration from Syracuse University. Kevin Kloesel is associate dean for public service and outreach in the Col- lege of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences at the University of Okla- homa. He is directly responsible for outreach programs and tours for the over 30,000 people who visit the National Weather Center facility in Nor- man annually. In addition, he is an associate professor in the Oklahoma University School of Meteorology, with teaching and research interests ranging from synoptic meteorology to societal impacts and decision making in weather-impacted situations. He led the team that won the Innovations in American Government Award from Harvard University and the Ford Foundation for their work with the emergency management community in Oklahoma. Currently, he works directly with thousands of K-12 students and teachers, as well as hundreds of emergency management agencies, in finding appropriate applications for weather data in local education and decision making. He was also a content designer for Scholastic Magazine’s The Magic School Bus Kicks Up a Storm children’s museum exhibit. Previ- ously, he was director of outreach for the Oklahoma Climatological Survey and served as director of the Florida Climate Center in Tallahassee. While a tenured faculty member at Florida State University, he served as a research fellow with the Cooperative Institute for Tropical Meteorology and co- directed an outreach project, EXPLORES!, which provided NOAA satellite data to over 200 schools. He has a B.S. in engineering science from the University of Texas at Austin and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University. Frances Lawrenz is associate vice president for research and professor of psychological foundations and quantitative methods in education at the University of Minnesota. She conducts research in science and mathematics program evaluation. Her evaluations use a variety of techniques and usu- ally involve mixing quantitative and qualitative methods. She is currently involved in the evaluation of several national science and mathematics programs, including the Collaborative Evaluation Communities in Urban Schools, the Active Physics Curricular Development, and the Impact and Effectiveness of the Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation Program. She has also completed a number of major evaluations, includ- ing the Systemic Initiative Evaluation, the Long Term Effects of Teacher Enhancement Evaluation, and the Authentic Assessment Systems for Con-

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 APPENDIX D structivist Based Elementary Science Programs Evaluation. She is interested in instrument development and in distinguishing, among various types of assessments, those that are most appropriate for a given situation. She won the Graduate-Professional Teaching Award for her contributions to gradu- ate and professional education in 2002. She applies evaluation methods to courses, programs, and advising to improve them. She has a B.S. in chem- istry with a minor in mathematics, an M.A. in education, and a Ph.D. in education with related fields of study in chemistry and mathematics from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. George I. Matsumoto is senior education and research specialist at the Mon- terey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. His role involves a variety of activi- ties: seminar coordinator, summer internship coordinator, Livelink mentor, distance education, and links between the research institute and other partners. His research interests focus on deep sea communities, particularly invertebrates in the open ocean. Specific areas of interest include ecology and biogeography of open ocean and deep sea organisms; functional mor- phology, natural history, and behavior of pelagic and benthic organisms; and systematic and evolution of ctenophores and cnidarians (molecular phylogeny). Matsumoto is active in several public service efforts, including as a volunteer scientist for Bay Area Schools for Excellence in Education, education session chair for the U.S. Ocean Research Priorities Plan, and board member of the Friends of the Monterey Academy of Oceanographic Sciences and for Camp SEALab. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the committee on the evaluation of the Sea Grant program review process and is a member of the Ocean Studies Board. He has an A.B. in marine botany from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in marine biology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Brett D. Moulding is the director of the Utah Partnership for Effective Science Teaching and Learning, a four district professional development collaborative. He was the director of curriculum and instruction at the Utah State Office of Education before retiring in January 2008. He was the state science education specialist and coordinator of curriculum from 1993 to 2004. At the National Research Council, Moulding is a member of the Board on Science Education. He taught chemistry for 20 years at Roy High School in the Weber District Science and served as the district teacher leader for 8 years. Moulding received the Governor’s Teacher Recognition Award, the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, and the Award of Excellence from the Governor’s Science and Technology Commission. He served on the Triangle Coalitional Board and the NAEP 2009 Framework Planning Committee and was president of the Council of State Science Supervisors from 2003 to 2006. He has a B.S. in chemistry

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 NOAA’S EDUCATION PROGRAM from the University of Utah and an M.Ed. from Weber State University. He has an administrative supervisory certificate from Utah State University. Frank E. Muller-Karger is a professor of biological oceanography at the University of South Florida. He is a biological oceanographer who con- ducts research on marine primary production using satellite remote sens- ing, large data sets, networking, and high-speed computing. His present work focuses on assessing the importance of continental margins, including areas of upwelling, river discharge, and coral reefs in the global carbon budget, using satellites that measure ocean color and sea surface tempera- ture. Muller-Karger has worked to educate K-12 teachers about the use of new technologies in oceanography through workshops sponsored by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA). He is interested in addressing the problem of underserved and underrepresented groups in academic science programs and has advocated for minorities, educators, and science education as a member of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. He served as director of the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing at the University of South Florida and as the science adviser for the Florida Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Ocean Studies Board and has served on the committees for Extending Observations and Research Results to Practical Applications: A Review of NASA’s Approach and An Assessment of Balance in NASA’s Science Programs. He received the NASA Jet Propulsion Labora- tory Award for Outstanding Contributions and the NASA Administrator Award for Exceptional Contribution and Service for supporting develop- ment of satellite technologies for ocean observation. He also received the Julius A. Stratton Award for Leadership. He has a B.S. in marine science from the Florida Institute of Technology, an M.S. in marine science from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and a Ph.D. in marine science from the University of Maryland. Laura Murray is a research professor at the University of Maryland’s Cen- ter for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory. Her expertise and research interests include seagrass and wetlands ecology, with a focus on the response of submerged aquatic vegetation to nutrient enrichment. As an educator, Murray’s primary goal has been to link the world-class research with science education. Her involvement in environmental science education includes conducting professional development workshops for teachers and informal educators, providing research experiences for teachers, establishing research-based programs for K-12 students, and administrating programs that partner scientists, educators, and students. She is currently the director of the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence Coastal Trends and the director of the Environmental Science Education Center at the Horn

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 APPENDIX D Point Laboratory. She has published in both the scientific research and in the science education fields. Murray has a B.S. in marine science and an M.S.T. in biology/education from the University of West Florida and a Ph.D. in wetlands ecology from the College of William and Mary. Rajul Pandya is the director of the Community Building Program at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Its mission is to build and support institutional relationships that will increase the diversity and societal relevance of the atmospheric and related sciences. Pandya is also director of SOARS, an internship program to broaden participation in the atmospheric and related sciences through research experience, men- toring, and a strong learning community. He also serves as coordinator of UCAR’s Africa Initiative, which seeks to support atmospheric research and applications in West Africa through capacity building and collaborative research. Pandya’s past scientific work has involved analytical and numeri- cal modeling of convection and other atmospheric phenomena, and his teaching has focused on enabling students to learn by working directly with visualizations and data in a variety of settings. Pandya has a B.S. in physics from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington, Seattle. Craig Strang is associate director of the Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) at the University of California, Berkeley, where he leads the Center for Lead- ership in Science Teaching and the Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-California (COSEE-CA). He was the first chair of the National COSEE Council. In addition, he is founding director of Marine Activities Resources and Education. Strang is the author of three multivolume sets of science and environmental education curriculum materials for grades K-8 and has developed professional development networks to support the implementation of each of these programs. Also, he authored three teacher guides published by the LHS Great Explorations in Math and Sci- ence program: On Sandy Shores, Ocean Currents, and Only One Ocean. He was the principal project consultant responsible for the creation and funding of a high school environmental justice internship program, XCEL: Cross-Cultural Environmental Leadership for Audubon Canyon Ranch. He is interested in the use of inquiry-based science instruction to promote lan- guage acquisition among English language learners. Strang has conducted field research on elephant seals and humpback whales and occasionally leads natural history ecotours to Baja California and Galapagos. He is past president of the Southwest Marine Educators Association and is a member of the executive committee of the board of directors of the National Marine Educators Association. He has a B.A. in environmental studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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 NOAA’S EDUCATION PROGRAM Clarice Yentsch is adjunct research scientist at the Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center in Dania Beach, Florida. She is also a consultant for the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. Previously, she was a research scientist and educator at the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum. Yentsch is the co-founder of Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in West Boothbay Harbor, Maine, and is founder of the J.J. MacIsaac Flow Cytometery/Cell Sorting Facil- ity there. She studies dinoflagellates, which cause toxic red tides and are symbiotic in reef-building corals, flow cytometry, and cell sorting. She is responsible for system reforms and curriculum development at the Educa- tion Development Center in Newton, Massachusetts. She has served on professional advisory boards and board of trustees for profit and not-for- profit science organizations. From 1998 to 2002, Yentsch served as an independent consultant with the American Museum of Natural History in New York. She has a B.S. in natural science and an M.A.T. in education from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a Ph.D. in oceanography from Nova Southeastern University.