Appendix D
Staff Biographies

Christine M. Micheel, Ph.D., joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2008 as a Mirzayan Science and Technology Graduate Fellow in the National Cancer Policy Forum (NCPF). She has worked on NCPF activities including “Improving the Quality of Cancer Clinical Trials,” “Implementing Colorectal Cancer Screening,” and “Multi-site Phase III Clinical Trials and NCI [National Cancer Institute] Cooperative Groups.” She is now the study director for the Committee on Qualification of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease, which is housed in the Board on Health Care Services. Prior to joining the IOM, Dr. Micheel completed a postdoctoral position at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA, where she studied interactions between biomolecules—such as DNA and antibodies—and nanomaterials. She completed her Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of California–Berkeley in 2005, under the direction of Paul Alivisatos and with the support of a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellowship. Her research was focused at the boundary between nanoscience and biophysics. Outside of her research pursuits, Dr. Micheel volunteered in the library at the Women’s Cancer Resource Center in Oakland, CA, a community resource for women with cancer and their families. Dr. Micheel obtained her Bachelor’s Degree at Washington University in St. Louis, MO, where she graduated magna cum laude with a major in Chemistry. Her undergraduate studies were supported by a Compton II fellowship (now known as the Florence Moog Fellowship) for pursuit of studies in the fields of biology and chemistry.



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Appendix D Staff Biographies Christine M. Micheel, Ph.D., joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2008 as a Mirzayan Science and Technology Graduate Fellow in the National Cancer Policy Forum (NCPF). She has worked on NCPF activi- ties including “Improving the Quality of Cancer Clinical Trials,” “Imple- menting Colorectal Cancer Screening,” and “Multi-site Phase III Clinical Trials and NCI [National Cancer Institute] Cooperative Groups.” She is now the study director for the Committee on Qualification of Biomark- ers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease, which is housed in the Board on Health Care Services. Prior to joining the IOM, Dr. Micheel completed a postdoctoral position at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA, where she studied interactions between biomolecules—such as DNA and antibodies—and nanomaterials. She completed her Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of California–Berkeley in 2005, under the direction of Paul Alivisatos and with the support of a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellowship. Her research was focused at the boundary between nanoscience and biophysics. Outside of her research pursuits, Dr. Micheel volunteered in the library at the Women’s Cancer Resource Center in Oakland, CA, a community resource for women with cancer and their families. Dr. Micheel obtained her Bachelor’s Degree at Washington University in St. Louis, MO, where she graduated magna cum laude with a major in Chemistry. Her undergraduate studies were supported by a Compton II fellowship (now known as the Florence Moog Fellowship) for pursuit of studies in the fields of biology and chemistry. 

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00 EVALUATION OF BIOMARKERS AND SURROGATE ENDPOINTS Sharyl Nass, Ph.D., is a study director and senior program officer at the IOM, where she has worked with the Board on Health Sciences Policy, the Board on Health Care Services, and the National Cancer Policy Board and Forum. She was also recently named as the director of the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum. Her previous work at the IOM has focused on topics that include developing cancer biomarkers, formulat - ing strategies for large-scale biomedical science, developing technologies for the early detection of breast cancer, improving breast imaging quality standards, improving the Health Insurance Portability and Accountabil - ity Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule, and facilitating contraceptive research and development. Her current IOM position combines her dual interests in biomedical research and health science policy. With a Ph.D. in Cell and Tumor Biology from Georgetown University and postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, she has authored numerous papers on the cell and molecular biology of breast cancer. She also holds a B.S. in Genetics and an M.S. in Endocrinology/Reproduc - tive Physiology, both from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In addition, she studied developmental genetics and molecular biology at the Max Planck Institute in Germany under a fellowship from Fulbright and the German Heinrich Hertz-Stiftung Foundation. Dr. Nass was the 2007 recipient of the IOM’s Cecil Award for Excellence in Health Policy Research. Erin Balogh, M.P.H., joined the IOM in 2008 as a research associate for the NCPF and Board on Health Care Services. She is currently working on two committee studies, the Qualification of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease and Cancer Clinical Trials and the NCI Cooperative Group Program. She completed her M.P.H. at the Univer- sity of Michigan in Health Management and Policy, and prior to that, graduated summa cum laude from Arizona State University with her Bachelor’s Degrees in Microbiology and Psychology. Ms. Balogh interned with AcademyHealth in Washington, DC, and worked as a research site coordinator for the Urban Institute in Topeka, Kansas. As an undergradu - ate, Ms. Balogh worked as a management intern with the Arizona State University Office of University Initiatives, a strategic planning group for the university. Bernadette McFadden, M.Sc., joined the IOM as a research associate in 2008. Since that time, she has staffed projects on the redesign of continu - ing education for health professionals and the standardization of race, ethnicity, and language data. She currently works with the Committee on Qualification of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease and the Committee on Future Directions for the National Healthcare

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0 APPENDIX D Quality and Disparities Reports. Prior to joining the IOM, she completed a Master’s Degree in Social Research at Trinity College Dublin and was employed by Dublin City Council’s Homeless Agency, where she edited a volume of essays on homelessness in Ireland and wrote a report on how the city’s management of public space impacts homeless persons. She graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Dickinson College in Pennsylvania. While in Pennsylvania, she conducted research on local effects of implementing Medicare Part D and the state’s long-term care policies; interned with the Executive Policy Office of the Pennsylvania Department of Health; and served as a board member for the United Way of Cumberland County. Her interests in health policy developed while serving as an AmeriCorps teacher in an Atlanta public school. Lisa Boyette, M.D., completed her M.D. at the University of Virginia in 2007 and is now working on a Ph.D. in Molecular Physiology and Biologi- cal Physics at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Her research at NIH focuses on stem cell reprogramming techniques and how reprogramming technology can be applied to cell-based therapies and tissue engineering. Dr. Boyette studied biomedical engineering and physics as an under- graduate at Virginia Commonwealth University and the Medical College of Virginia. Following completion of her Ph.D., she plans to complete residency training in Neurosurgery. Through her Mirzayan Fellowship with the National Cancer Policy Forum, she learned about crafting policy that promotes research that will effectively advance the standard of care provided to patients. Anna Woloszynska-Read, Ph.D., was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow with the NCPF from January to April 2009. During her Fellowship, Dr. Woloszynska-Read contributed to the study on “Qualification of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease” and the study on “Cancer Clinical Trials and the NCI Cooperative Groups.” She completed her Ph.D. in Molecular Phar- macology at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, in 2009, with the support of an NIH predoctoral training grant. She holds an M.S. in Human Biology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland. Her dis - sertation work involved translational research relating to the epigenetics of ovarian cancer, with the hopes of developing early diagnostic tools and novel treatments for the disease. During her time as a graduate student, she worked with the Scientific Review Committee and the Institutional Review Board at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. This experience has made her aware of the importance of science policy and the institutional over- sight of scientific research. She is currently in a postdoctoral research position at Roswell Park Cancer Institute that combines her interests in

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0 EVALUATION OF BIOMARKERS AND SURROGATE ENDPOINTS basic science and policy, focusing on translational research and issues of health disparities. Caira M. Woods, Ph.D., is a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow with the Board on Health Care Services and National Can - cer Policy Forum. Her interests center around federal-level health and sci- ence policy. She completed her Ph.D. in basic medical science at New York University in December 2009. Her research was funded by a National Research Service Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and received an honorable mention from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Dr. Woods is a member of Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society and a magna cum laude gradu- ate of Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. During and after college, she participated in summer science programs at Spelman, the NIH, Duke University Medical Center and the NSF. As an intern, Dr. Woods evalu- ated NSF-funded workshops on broadening participation. This experi- ence introduced her to science policy and solidified her desire to pursue a career in this field. Dr. Woods is particularly interested in public under- standing of science, broadening participation, global competitiveness and health policy and is thrilled to have the opportunity to gain a more in- depth perspective on the role scientists can play in implementing and improving programs in these areas. Ashley McWilliams joined the IOM in September 2008 as a senior pro- gram assistant for the Board on Health Care Services and the National Cancer Policy Forum. At the IOM, she is working on projects such as the Committee on Qualification of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease and the Workshop Planning Committee for the National Emergency Care Enterprise. She has also worked with the IOM’s Round - table on Evidence-based Medicine and the Office of Reports and Com - munication. Prior to joining the IOM, Ms. McWilliams graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Howard University with a Bach- elor’s Degree in Biology in 2008. During college, Ms. McWilliams was copresident of the Health Professions Society and a member of several honor societies. Ms. McWilliams has also participated in summer research programs at the University of California–San Francisco, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni - versity; she also participated in a summer health careers program at Case Western Reserve University. Roger Herdman, M.D., is director of the IOM Board on Health Care Ser- vices. He received his undergraduate and medical school degrees from Yale University. Following an internship at the University of Minnesota

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0 APPENDIX D and a stint in the U.S. Navy, he returned to Minnesota, where he com - pleted a residency in Pediatrics and a Fellowship in Immunology and Nephrology and also served on the faculty. He served as professor of Pediatrics at Albany Medical College until 1979. In 1969, Dr. Herdman was appointed director of the New York State Kidney Disease Institute in Albany, NY, and shortly thereafter was appointed deputy commissioner of the New York State Department of Health (1969–1977). In 1977 he was named New York State’s director of public health. From 1979 until joining the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), he served as a vice president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. In 1983, Dr. Herdman was named assistant director of OTA, where he subsequently served as director from 1993 to 1996. He later joined the IOM as a senior scholar and directed studies on graduate medical edu - cation, organ transplantation, silicone breast implants, and the Veterans Administration national formulary. Dr. Herdman was appointed director of the IOM/National Research Council National Cancer Policy Board from 2000 through 2005. From 2005 until 2009, Dr. Herdman directed the IOM National Cancer Policy Forum. In 2007, he was also appointed director of the IOM Board on Health Care Services. During his work at the IOM, Dr. Herdman has worked closely with the U.S. Congress on a wide variety of healthcare policy issues. Linda D. Meyers, Ph.D., is director of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) at the IOM. She is responsible for a portfolio that includes nutri - ent requirements (Dietary Reference Intakes), obesity prevention, food safety, and international, military, and specific population nutrition. She also directed the FNB’s international nutrition program from 1982 to 1986. From 1986 to 2001, she served in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where she was a senior nutrition advisor, deputy director, and acting director. While there, she oversaw preparation of a number of technical and policy reports, including the 1990, 1995, and 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the U.S. Action Plan on Food Security, and the national health objectives for 2010. Dr. Meyers has a B.A. in Health and Physical Education from Goshen College in Indiana, an M.S. in Food and Nutrition from Colorado State University, and a Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences from Cornell University. Her research has focused on population indicators of nutritional status. She has also worked in Botswana, Kenya, and Vietnam. Dr. Meyers has received a number of awards for her contributions to public health, including the Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award for Healthy People 00 and the Surgeon General’s Medallion.

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0 EVALUATION OF BIOMARKERS AND SURROGATE ENDPOINTS Andrew Pope, Ph.D., is director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. He has a Ph.D. in Physiology and Biochemistry from the Uni- versity of Maryland and has been a member of The National Academies staff since 1982 and of the IOM staff since 1989. His primary interests are science policy, biomedical ethics, and environmental and occupa- tional influences on human health. During his tenure at The National Academies, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, disability prevention, and biologic markers to the protection of human subjects of research, NIH priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Dr. Pope is the recipient of the IOM’s Cecil Award and the National Academy of Sciences President’s Special Achievement Award.