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Appendix B
Committee Biographies

George E. Bruening, Chair, is a Professor Emeritus at University of California, Davis. Dr. Bruening’s research interests are in the area of replication mechanisms of plant viruses and how these mechanisms may be interdicted by plant genes, subviral agents, or engineered genes. He specializes in plant resistance against viruses and bacteria and biotechnology in plant pathology and agriculture. He has held several editorial positions including: Associate Editor and Editor of Virology and founding Editor-in-Chief of Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journals. Dr. Bruening is a member of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Pierce’s Disease Advisory Task Force, 2007-present. He was the director of the Center for Engineering Plants for Resistance Against Pathogens, National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center at the University of California, Davis, from 1991-2002. He currently serves as the director of the University of California Pierce’s Disease Grants Program, a position he has held since 2006. He teaches general undergraduate courses in agricultural biotechnology and graduate courses in plant virology and general virology. Dr. Bruening has been widely recognized through honors such as: the NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship, 1965–1966; the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, 1974–1975; and the Award of Distinction, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California at Davis, 2008. He was elected as a National Academy of Science member in 1992. He served as the Chair of the Parent Committee on the Review of Citrus Greening Proposals in 2008. Dr. Bruening received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.


Joseph-Marie Bové has been an Emeritus Professor of microbiology at the University of Bordeaux since 1999. Prior to this, Dr. Bové was President of the National Institute for Agricultural Research Center of Bordeaux from 1984 to 1994. He served from 1981 to 1992 and 2004 to 2007 as part-time consultant for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to survey for citrus diseases in the Near East and the Middle East. Results of the surveys have been published by FAO in the form of a book (1995). During these surveys, he discovered huanglongbing (HLB) in Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Somalia, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Vietnam and Bhutan. He is a member of the French Academy of Agriculture, the French Academy of Science, the Brazilian Academy of Science, the American Academy of Microbiology and is an elected fellow of the American Phytopathological Society. He is also a member of the International Organization of Citrus Virologists; he served as its president from 1969 to 1972. He



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Appendix B Committee Biographies George E. Bruening, Chair, is a Professor Emeritus at University of California, Davis. Dr. Bruening’s research interests are in the area of replication mechanisms of plant viruses and how these mechanisms may be interdicted by plant genes, subviral agents, or engineered genes. He specializes in plant resistance against viruses and bacteria and biotechnology in plant pathology and agriculture. He has held several editorial positions including: Associate Editor and Editor of Virology and founding Editor-in-Chief of Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journals. Dr. Bruening is a member of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Pierce’s Disease Advisory Task Force, 2007-present. He was the director of the Center for Engineering Plants for Resistance Against Pathogens, National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center at the University of California, Davis, from 1991-2002. He currently serves as the director of the University of California Pierce’s Disease Grants Program, a position he has held since 2006. He teaches general undergraduate courses in agricultural biotechnology and graduate courses in plant virology and general virology. Dr. Bruening has been widely recognized through honors such as: the NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship, 1965–1966; the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, 1974–1975; and the Award of Distinction, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California at Davis, 2008. He was elected as a National Academy of Science member in 1992. He served as the Chair of the Parent Committee on the Review of Citrus Greening Proposals in 2008. Dr. Bruening received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Joseph-Marie Bové has been an Emeritus Professor of microbiology at the University of Bordeaux since 1999. Prior to this, Dr. Bové was President of the National Institute for Agricultural Research Center of Bordeaux from 1984 to 1994. He served from 1981 to 1992 and 2004 to 2007 as part-time consultant for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to survey for citrus diseases in the Near East and the Middle East. Results of the surveys have been published by FAO in the form of a book (1995). During these surveys, he discovered huanglongbing (HLB) in Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Somalia, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Vietnam and Bhutan. He is a member of the French Academy of Agriculture, the French Academy of Science, the Brazilian Academy of Science, the American Academy of Microbiology and is an elected fellow of the American Phytopathological Society. He is also a member of the International Organization of Citrus Virologists; he served as its president from 1969 to 1972. He 187

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188 STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR FLORIDA CITRUS INDUSTRY served as the president of the International Organization for Mycoplasmology, from 1992 to 1994. Since 2004, when HLB was identified in Brazil, this destructive disease of citrus has become Bové’s major occupation in Brazil and other affected countries. Dr. Bové has over 250 publications in international refereed journals. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Paris, France. Paul Citron retired from Medtronic Inc. in 2003 as Vice President of Technology Policy and Academic Relations. In that position he was responsible for identifying and addressing public policy matters that affect medical technology innovation and for working with leading biomedical engineering institutions. He is currently an adjunct faculty member at University of California (UC), San Diego and UC Riverside, Department of Bioengineering. Mr. Citron was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2003; he was elected as a Founding Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering in 1993; he received the American College of Cardiology Governor’s Award for Excellence twice; and was inducted as a Fellow of the Medtronic Bakken Society in 1980. He was voted the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Young Electrical Engineer of the Year in 1979. He has authored numerous publications including refereed articles in the IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering journal; and holds several medical device pacing-related patents. In 1980, he was given Medtronic’s "Invention of Distinction" award for his role as co-inventor of the tined pacing lead. Mr. Citron has served on many management committees and advisory boards, including the Biomedical Engineering Materials and Applications Roundtable and the National Research Council, from 2001 to present. Mr. Citron holds a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. Philip W. Miller currently serves as the Vice President of US Product Management in the Monsanto US Commercial Organization. He is responsible for product portfolio planning and execution throughout the product life cycle, including gathering and prioritizing product and customer requirements, defining the product vision, and working closely with research and development, corporate strategy, sales, marketing and support groups. Dr. Miller joined Monsanto in 1994 and has held numerous roles in the Monsanto Technology organization spanning Chemical Discovery and Biotechnology Research and Development. Key roles include Director of Biotechnology Crop Yield Enhancement and Crop Genomics research, Monsanto/Ceres Research Collaboration Lead, Director of the Monsanto Connecticut Research Center and Biotechnology Corn Pipeline Strategy Lead. Prior to his current role he served as Vice President of US Technology Development. Dr. Miller served on US Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Health, and National Science Foundation sponsored review panels, and as a scientific reviewer for numerous journals. He is the inventor on numerous patents and the author of seventeen scientific papers in journals including Plant Molecular Biology and book chapters. Dr. Miller earned his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Florida. Lowell R. Nault is a Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University. He has extensive research experience in the transmission of plant pathogens by arthropods and in the evolutionary biology of vectors and plant pathogens. He has worked in collaboration with US Department of Agriculture entomologists on a spectrum of problems ranging from molecular to landscape ecology, especially maize vectors and pathogens. Dr. Nault has authored well over 100 peer- reviewed articles and co-edited the text The Leafhoppers and Planthoppers. Dr. Nault is a fellow

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APPENDIX B 189 of several professional societies, including the American Phytopathological Society, the Entomological Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as president of the Entomological Society of America from 1990–1991. He was one of six Ohio State University faculty selected in 1999 as a "Distinguished Scholar." In 1982 and in 1985, he served as Program Manager for the US Department of Agriculture Competitive Research Grants Office (entomology, plant pathology, nematology, and weed science programs). From 1995 until he retired (2002), he served as Associate Director of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center and as Interim Director in 1999. Dr. Nault received his Ph.D., with a major in Entomology and minor in Plant Pathology, from Cornell University. MaryLou L. Polek currently serves as the Vice President for Operations of the California Citrus Research Board. She is responsible for implanting the industry-funded action program against the Asian citrus psyllid and Huanglongbing disease. As a plant pathologist who has specialized in citrus, she brings to the job more than 30 years’ experience in plant disease diagnostics and laboratory management. She also serves on the executive committee of the California Huanglongbing Task Force as the Chair of the Science and Technology Advisory Committee. Dr. Polek has completed a 14-year tenure at the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) where she served in both the Integrated Pest Control and Emergency Projects branches. Most recently she served as program manager and plant pathologist for the Central California Tristeza Eradication Agency. Prior to her work with CDFA, Dr. Polek was a researcher at University of California, Riverside in the Plant Pathology and Botany and Plant Sciences departments, and earlier in her career she was an instructor for biology laboratory classes at Saddleback College. She has published in refereed scientific journals including Phytopathology and Plant Disease. She is a member of the American Phytopathological Society and the International Organization of Citrus Virologists. Dr. Polek earned her Ph.D. in Plant Pathology from the University of California, Riverside. Howard-Yana Shapiro is the Global Director of Plant Science and External Research for Mars Incorporated. He leads the Mars global effort on the sequencing, annotation, and assembly of the Theobroma cacao genome. Dr. Shapiro is also an Adjunct Professor in the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at The University of California, Davis and is the chair of the Advisory Board for the Agricultural Sustainability Institute. He has been involved with sustainable agricultural and agroforestry systems, plant genetics, and food production systems for over 40 years, with projects in the US, the EU, Mexico and Latin America, South America, and West Africa. He is a two-time Fulbright Scholar, a two-time Ford Foundation Fellow, and a winner of the National Endowment for the Humanities Award. Dr. Shapiro is formerly a university professor and for the last eleven years has been Vice President for Agriculture for Seeds of Change. Dr. Shapiro joined the International Assessment of Agricultural Science and Technology for Development as a Contributing Author on the Global Synthesis and co-wrote the chapter on Biotechnology. He was one of the founding members of the Sustainable Agriculture Roundtable, which was established in 2006. In 2007, he was awarded the Organic Leadership Award from the Organic Trade Association. In 2008, he was named a World Agroforestry Centre Fellow for his outstanding contribution to multifunctional agroforestry and global land-use issues.

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190 STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR FLORIDA CITRUS INDUSTRY Anthony M. Shelton is a Professor at the Department of Entomology at Cornell University’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. Dr. Shelton is responsible for developing sound insect pest management strategies for vegetables, with spin- offs for other crops. Components of his program stress insect population ecology, biological control, plant resistance, agricultural biotechnology, insecticide resistance, insect movement, trap cropping, and plant productivity and marketability as a function of insect infestations. His program works with presently available strategies and helps incorporate them into pest management programs, and develops new strategies for the future. Most of Dr. Shelton’s teaching responsibilities involve guest lectures on biotechnology, integrated pest management, and international agriculture. His international activities are focused primarily in India, China, and Latin America. He is a member of the Entomological Society of America, the Society for Invertebrate Pathology, and the National Agricultural Biotechnology Council. He has served on numerous panels, including as presenter to the 2002 NRC Committee on the Biological Containment of Genetically Modified Organisms and the 2007 US Agency for International Development Plant Biosafety Systems Review Panel. Dr. Shelton has been recognized with several awards, including the 2006 National Agriculture Extension Award for Publication, Organic Agriculture. Dr. Shelton has a Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of California, Riverside. Lavern W. "Pete" Timmer is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center (CREC). He is considered the leading citrus pathologist in the Americas and is known worldwide for expertise in plant pathology and citriculture. He has contributed substantially to the field of etiology, epidemiology, and control of fungal and bacterial diseases of citrus fruits and foliage while also studying other problems in citrus, such as blight, viral, and soil-borne diseases. Dr. Timmer held Associate Professor and Professor positions at the University of Florida-CREC from 1979 until his retirement in 2006. He is fluent in Spanish and was often invited to give presentations all over the world; he has also collaborated with other scientists on many international research projects. Dr. Timmer has been an Associate and Senior Editor of Phytopathology and Plant Disease journals, and was Senior Editor of the Compendium of Citrus Diseases and Citrus Health Management. He has published numerous articles in refereed journals and has authored or edited several books on citrus health. He received the International Organization of Citrus Virologists Special Award for Exceptional Research in 1989, the Citrus Research and Educational Scientist of the Year Award in 1995, the Lee Hutchins Award for excellence in research on fruit crops in 1996, and was inducted as a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society in 2000. He received his B.S. in Botany and Plant Pathology from Michigan State University and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside. James H. Tumlinson, III is the Ralph O. Mumma Professor of Entomology and the Director for the Center for Chemical Ecology at Pennsylvania State University. He has done pioneering work on chemical communications between plants and insects, including volatile signals that attract natural enemies of insect pests of plants. He is a world leader in characterizing pheromones from diverse insect species and turning basic discoveries on chemical communications into novel insect management strategies. Dr. Tumlinson currently collaborates with scientists in Brazil, in Japan, and in South Africa to investigate plant-insect interactions and plant defenses. He focuses on the development of fundamental knowledge and principles that can be applied in environmentally safe pest management programs. Dr. Tumlinson has received numerous

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APPENDIX B 191 recognitions including membership to the National Academy of Science, 1997, the J.E. Bussart Memorial Award from the Entomological Society of America, 1990; The US Department of Agriculture Secretary of Agriculture's Award for Personal and Professional Excellence, 1995; and the Presidential Rank Award as a Meritorious Senior Professional in USDA, Agriculture Research Service, 2003. He was also the co-awardee of the 2008 Wolf Foundation Prize in Agriculture for the discovery of mechanisms governing plant-insect and plant-plant interactions. ISI Essential Science Indicators listed Tumlinson's publications in the top 1% in terms of total citations in the field of Environment/Ecology, 2002. He has published hundreds of refereed articles, conference papers, and reviews in journals such as the Journal of Chemical Ecology and the Proceedings of the NAS. Dr. Tumlinson earned his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Mississippi State University. Raymond K. Yokomi. Dr. Ray Yokomi has over 30 years of research experience in both applied and basic aspects of entomology, insect vectors, and plant pathology. He is recognized for his contributions in aphid transmission and characterizations of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), detection and epidemiology of Spiroplasma citri, biological control of aphids, and plant-whitefly interactions and associated phytotoxemias. Dr. Yokomi joined the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agriculture Research Service in 1982 as an entomologist. Since 1997, his research has expanded to plant pathology, in particular the biological and molecular characterization of CTV and S. citri, the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease. Dr. Yokomi has served on various task forces in Florida and California on CTV and Toxoptera citricida, the brown citrus aphid. He is a member of the team that developed the Recovery Plan for Huanglongbing or Citrus Greening for the USDA Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service, National Plant Recovery System. He was a member of the Parent Committee on the Review of Citrus Greening Proposals in 2008. Dr. Yokomi has a Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of California, Davis.

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