Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Ellen Condliffe Lagemann (Cochair, 2007-2009, Chair, 2009-2010) is the Levy Institute research professor and a senior scholar at the Levy Economics Institute at Bard College in New York. Previously, she was the Charles Warren professor of the history of American education at Harvard University and former dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She also served as the president of the Spencer Foundation, as a professor of history and education at New York University, and as a professor of education at the Teachers College at Columbia University. She is a past president of the National Academy of Education and the History of Education Society, and has served on the boards of the Teaching Commission, Jobs for the Future, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She has written widely on many topics, including education reform, education research, philanthropy in education, women’s history, and nursing. She has an undergraduate degree from Smith College, an M.A. in social studies from Teachers College, and a Ph.D. in history and education from Columbia University.


Herbert K. Brunkhorst is professor in the Department of Biology in the College of Natural Sciences and chair of the Department of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education in the College of Education at the California State University at San Bernardino. He previously taught at the precollege level. He has served as a senior faculty researcher for the U.S. Department of Education’s Salish Consortium, a multidimensional collaborative research effort for improving science and mathematics teacher education. He



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Ellen Condliffe Lagemann (Cochair, 2007-2009, Chair, 2009-2010) is the Levy Institute research professor and a senior scholar at the Levy Econom- ics Institute at Bard College in New York. Previously, she was the Charles Warren professor of the history of American education at Harvard Univer- sity and former dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She also served as the president of the Spencer Foundation, as a professor of his- tory and education at New York University, and as a professor of education at the Teachers College at Columbia University. She is a past president of the National Academy of Education and the History of Education Society, and has served on the boards of the Teaching Commission, Jobs for the Future, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She has written widely on many topics, including education reform, education research, philanthropy in education, women’s history, and nursing. She has an undergraduate degree from Smith College, an M.A. in social studies from Teachers College, and a Ph.D. in history and education from Columbia University. Herbert K. Brunkhorst is professor in the Department of Biology in the Col- lege of Natural Sciences and chair of the Department of Science, Mathemat- ics, and Technology Education in the College of Education at the California State University at San Bernardino. He previously taught at the precollege level. He has served as a senior faculty researcher for the U.S. Department of Education’s Salish Consortium, a multidimensional collaborative re- search effort for improving science and mathematics teacher education. He 2

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22 PREPARING TEACHERS is a fellow of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, and was elected director of the preservice teacher preparation division of the National Science Teachers Association. He has a B.A. in biology from Coe College, an M.A.S. in science education and a Ph.D. in science education and plant physiology from the University of Iowa. Margarita Calderón is a senior research scientist at the Center for Data- Driven Reform in Education at Johns Hopkins University. She is a co- principal investigator on a randomized evaluation of English immersion, transitional, and two-way bilingual programs for the Institute for Educa- tion Sciences of the U.S. Department of Education. She is also conduct- ing longitudinal research and development projects in El Paso, Texas, on teachers’ learning communities, bilingual staff development, and adult Eng- lish-language learners. Other research topics include ESL reading, Spanish- English transitional reading, two-way bilingual reading, and the transition from Spanish reading into English reading. She has a B.A. in English, French, and journalism, an M.A. in applied linguistics from the University of Texas, El Paso, and a Ph.D. in educational management, sociolinguistics, and organizational development from Claremont Graduate School and San Diego State University. Marilyn Cochran-Smith is the John E. Cawthorne professor of teacher education for urban schools at the Lynch School of Education of Boston College where she directs the doctoral program in curriculum and instruc- tion. She is the immediate past president of the American Educational Re- search Association and has also served as the co-chair of the organization’s National Consensus Panel on Teacher Education. Her research has con- centrated on teacher education across the professional lifespan; teaching and issues of race, class, culture, and gender; teacher research/practitioner inquiry; children’s early language and literacy learning, and outcomes, teaching quality, and competing agendas for education reform. She has a B.A. in sociology from the College of Wooster, an M.Ed. in curriculum and instruction from Cleveland State University, and a Ph.D. from the Univer- sity of Pennsylvania. Janice Dole is in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Utah. After several years as an elementary teacher, she held positions at the University of Denver, the Center for the Study of Reading at the Uni- versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Michigan State University. She has written for many different audiences, including teachers, adminis- trators, and reading researchers and other educational researchers. She is currently a member of the Reading Development Panel for the National Assessment of Educational Progress and working for the research and

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2 APPENDIX C development section of the American Federation for Teachers. Her current research focuses on comprehension instruction at the K-3 level and reading professional development for K-3 teachers in at-risk schools. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Colorado. Donald N. Langenberg is chancellor emeritus of the 13-institution Uni- versity System of Maryland. Previously, he was a professor of physics and then chancellor of the University of Illinois at Chicago. He served as deputy director of the National Science Foundation under President Jimmy Carter. His research has been primarily in experimental condensed matter physics and materials science, with a major focus on the study of superconductivity. He has served as chair of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, as president of the American Physical Society, and on the boards of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the University of Pennsylva- nia. As chair of the National Reading Panel in 1998-2000, he headed the committee that issued Teaching Children to Read. He has a B.S. from Iowa State University, an M.S. from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, all in physics. He also has received honorary degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and the State University of New York. Ronald Latanision is the corporate vice president and practice director of the Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Center at Exponent Consulting, Inc. He is the author or co-author of more than 200 scientific publications, and he has been a consultant to industry and government. He served as a science adviser to the Committee on Science and Technology of the U.S. House of Representatives, and he served on the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board under President George W. Bush. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has a B.S. in metallurgy from the Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University. James Lewis is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and direc- tor of the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Computer Education at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. He previously served as depart- ment chair, and during that tenure the department won the university-wide Departmental Teaching Award and a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. He served as the coprincipal investigator for the Nebraska Math and Science Initiative and led a study to revise the mathematics education of future elementary school

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2 PREPARING TEACHERS teachers at the university. He has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from Louisiana State University. David H. Monk is professor of educational administration and dean of the College of Education at the Pennsylvania State University. Previously, he was a professor at Cornell University, and he has also been a 3rd-grade teacher and a visiting professor at the University of Rochester and the Uni- versity of Burgundy in Dijon, France. He serves on the editorial boards of The Economics of Education Review, The Journal of Education Finance, Educational Policy, and the Journal of Research in Rural Education. He consults widely on matters related to educational productivity and the organizational structuring of schools and school districts and is a past president of the American Education Finance Association. He has an A.B. in economics from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in educational admin- istration from the University of Chicago. Annemarie Sullivan Palincsar is the Jean and Charles Walgreen Jr. profes- sor of reading and literacy in the School of Education at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the design of learning environments that support self-regulation in learning activity, especially for children who ex- perience difficulty learning in school. She studies how children use literacy in the context of guided inquiry science instruction, what types of text support children’s inquiry, and what support students who are identified as atypical learners. She is a member of the Reading Study Group at RAND, the National Education Goals Panel, and the National Advisory Board to Children’s Television Workshop. She is the coeditor of Cognition and In- struction. She has a B.S. in special education from Fitchburg State College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Michael Podgursky is Middlebush professor of economics at the Uni- versity of Missouri at Columbia. Previously, he served on the faculty of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He has published numerous articles and reports on education policy and teacher quality and coau- thored a book titled Teacher Pay and Teacher Quality. He is a member of the advisory boards of the National Center for Teacher Quality and the American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence. Podgursky served on the faculty of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He has a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Missouri at Co- lumbia and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

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2 APPENDIX C Andrew Porter is dean of the Graduate School of Education and the George and Diane Weiss Professor of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. He has published widely on psychometrics, student assessment, education indicators, and research on teaching. His current work focuses on curricu- lum policies and their effects on opportunity to learn, and includes serving as codirector of System-Wide Change for All Learners and Educators, as the principal investigator of studies on the use of longitudinal designs to measure effects of professional development and on improving effectiveness of instruction in mathematics and science with data on enacted curriculum, and aas a member of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education. He is an elected member and former officer of the National Academy of Education, a lifetime National Associate of the National Academies, and past president of the American Educational Research Association. He has a B.S. in education from Indiana University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in educational psychology from the University of Wisconsin. Kenneth Shine is Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs of the Uni- versity of Texas System and professor of medicine emeritus at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is the former president of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies and was the founding director of the RAND Center for Domestic and International Health Security. A cardiolo- gist and physiologist, he is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and American College of Physicians and a member of many other honorary and academic societies, including the Institute of Medicine. He has served as chair of the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges and as president of the American Heart Association. He has an A.B. in biochemical sciences from Harvard College and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Edward Silver is William A. Brownell collegiate professor of Education and professor of mathematics at the School of Education at the University of Michigan. Previously, he was a senior scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center and professor at the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests focus on the teaching, learning, and assessment of mathematics, particularly mathematical problem solving. He is also actively involved in efforts to promote high-quality mathematics education for all students, particularly Hispanic students. He has served on a number of editorial boards and has published numerous articles and several books in the field of mathematics education. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Iona College, an M.S. in mathematics from Columbia University, and M.A and Ed.D. degrees in mathematics education from Teachers College of Columbia University.

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26 PREPARING TEACHERS Dorothy Strickland is the Samuel DeWitt Proctor professor of education at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Previously, she was a classroom teacher in the New Jersey public schools, the Arthur I. Gates professor at Teachers College of Columbia University, and a faculty member at Kean University and New Jersey City University. She is a past president of both the International Reading Association and its Reading Hall of Fame, and she has held several elected positions in the National Council of Teachers of English. She is also active in the National Association for the Education of Young Children and was a member of the panel that produced Becoming a Nation of Readers. She has a B.S. in elementary education from Newark State College (now Kean University) and an M.A. in educational psychol- ogy a Ph.D. in early childhood and elementary education from New York University. Suzanne Wilson is a university distinguished professor and chair of the De- partment of Teacher Education and director of the College of Education’s Center for the Scholarship of Teaching at Michigan State University. Her work spans several domains, including teacher learning, teacher knowledge, and the connection between educational policy and teachers’ practice. She has also conducted research on history and mathematics teaching. Her cur- rent work focuses on developing sound measures for tracking what teach- ers learn in teacher preparation, induction, and professional development. She has a B.A. and teaching certificate in American History and American civilization from Brown University and an M.S. in statistics and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University. Hung-Hsi Wu is a professor of mathematics at the University of California at Berkeley. His mathematics research focuses on differential geometry, and he has authored numerous research papers and monographs, as well as three graduate level textbooks in Chinese. He has also been involved in K-12 mathematics education, working on the development of Califor- nia’s Mathematics Professional Development Institutes and the California’s Mathematics Framework. He served as a member of the Mathematics Steering Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress and Achieve. He has an A.B. from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James Wyckoff is a professor in the Curry School of Education at the Uni- versity of Virginia. He has written widely on issues of education finance, including teacher compensation and teacher recruitment and retention of teachers in New York State. Currently, he examining attributes of teacher preparation programs and pathways and induction programs that are effec- tive in increasing the retention of teachers and the performance of students.

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2 APPENDIX C He directs the Education Finance Research Consortium and serves on the editorial boards of Education Finance and Policy and the Economics of Ed- ucation Review. He is a past president of the American Education Finance Association. He has a B.A. in economics from Denison University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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