Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Stephen W. Pacala, chair, is Frederick D. Petrie Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University and director of the Princeton Environmental Institute. He also co-directs the Carbon Mitigation Initiative, a collaboration between Princeton University, British Petroleum, and the Ford Motor Company to develop strategies to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions. Dr. Pacala received his Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University. His research focuses on ecology and modeling, with an emphasis on the interactions between greenhouse gases, climate, and the biosphere. He was a coordinating lead author of a chapter on the North American carbon budget in the 2006 assessment The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report: The North American Carbon Budget and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle (CCSP, 2007). Among his many honors are the David Starr Jordan Prize and the George Mercer Award of the Ecological Society of America. Dr. Pacala is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.


Clare Breidenich is an independent consultant with more than 12 years of experience on climate change policy in general and on the Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in particular. From 2002 to 2006, she was a senior program officer at the UNFCCC Secretariat, where she managed the review process for national greenhouse gas inventories of 40 countries and directed activities related to data systems and procedures for the Kyoto Protocol’s reporting, review and compliance procedures. This experience, as well as work for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State Department has given her extensive knowledge of the technical and policy options for greenhouse gas mitigation, including market mechanisms, and methodologies and protocols for estimation, reporting, and verification of greenhouse gas emissions and reductions. Ms. Breidenich has an M.S. in environmental science from Indiana University and a B.A. from the University of Michigan.


Peter G. Brewer is an ocean chemist and senior scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. His research interests include the ocean chemistry of greenhouse gases, the geochemistry of gas hydrates, ocean acidification, and the evolution of the oceanic fossil-fuel CO2 signal. He has devised novel techniques for measuring and extracting the oceanic signatures of global change. Dr. Brewer has served on many committees associated with ocean trace gases, including the Joint Global Ocean Fluxes Committee, the National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Policy Implications of Greenhouse Gas Warming: Mitigation, and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research’s Working Group 75 on Ocean CO2 Monitoring. He was a member of MEDEA. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Geophysical Union, serving as president of the Ocean Sciences Section for 2 years. He received a Ph.D. and a B.S. from Liverpool University in England.



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Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Stephen W. Pacala, chair, is Frederick D. Petrie Profes- cedures for the Kyoto Protocol’s reporting, review and compliance procedures. This experience, as well as work sor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and University and director of the Princeton Environmental the State Department has given her extensive knowl- Institute. He also co-directs the Carbon Mitigation edge of the technical and policy options for greenhouse Initiative, a collaboration between Princeton Univer- gas mitigation, including market mechanisms, and sity, British Petroleum, and the Ford Motor Company methodologies and protocols for estimation, reporting, to develop strategies to reduce global carbon dioxide and verification of greenhouse gas emissions and reduc- emissions. Dr. Pacala received his Ph.D. in biology tions. Ms. Breidenich has an M.S. in environmental from Stanford University. His research focuses on ecol- science from Indiana University and a B.A. from the ogy and modeling, with an emphasis on the interactions University of Michigan. between greenhouse gases, climate, and the biosphere. He was a coordinating lead author of a chapter on the Peter G. Brewer is an ocean chemist and senior scien- North American carbon budget in the 2006 assessment tist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report: The North His research interests include the ocean chemistry of American Carbon Budget and Implications for the Global greenhouse gases, the geochemistry of gas hydrates, Carbon Cycle (CCSP, 2007). Among his many honors ocean acidification, and the evolution of the oceanic are the David Starr Jordan Prize and the George Mer- fossil-fuel CO2 signal. He has devised novel techniques cer Award of the Ecological Society of America. Dr. for measuring and extracting the oceanic signatures of Pacala is a fellow of the American Association for the global change. Dr. Brewer has served on many com- Advancement of Science and a member of the Ameri- mittees associated with ocean trace gases, including the can Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Joint Global Ocean Fluxes Committee, the National Academy of Sciences. Research Council (NRC) Panel on Policy Implications Clare Breidenich is an independent consultant with of Greenhouse Gas Warming: Mitigation, and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research’s Work- more than 12 years of experience on climate change ing Group 75 on Ocean CO2 Monitoring. He was a policy in general and on the Kyoto Protocol of the member of MEDEA. He is a fellow of the American United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Change (UNFCCC) in particular. From 2002 to 2006, American Geophysical Union, serving as president of she was a senior program officer at the UNFCCC the Ocean Sciences Section for 2 years. He received Secretariat, where she managed the review process for a P h.D. and a B.S. from Liverpool University in national greenhouse gas inventories of 40 countries England. and directed activities related to data systems and pro- 0

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0 APPENDIX E Inez Fung is a professor of atmospheric sciences and company’s carbon markets team, and for managing Chevron’s internal carbon trading registry. Prior to founding co-director of the Berkeley Institute of the joining Chevron in 2005, she worked as a technology Environment at the University of California, Berkeley. policy analyst at the Cooperative Research Centre for She studies the interactions between climate change Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) in Aus- and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the processes tralia. Ms. Heddle holds a dual M.S. in technology that maintain and alter the composition of the atmo- and policy and in civil and environmental engineering sphere. Her research emphasis is on using atmospheric from MIT, an M.S. in chemical engineering from the transport models and a coupled carbon-climate model University of Sydney, Australia, and a double B.S. and to examine how CO2 sources and sinks are chang- B.A. from the University of Adelaide, Australia. ing. She was also a member of the science team for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Beverly E. Law is a professor of global change forest ( NASA’s) Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO). science in the College of Forestry at Oregon State Dr. Fung is a recipient of the American Geophysical University. Her research focuses on the role of forests, Union’s Roger Revelle Medal and appears in a new woodlands, and shrublands in the global carbon cycle. National Academy of Sciences biography series for Her approach is interdisciplinary, involving observa- middle-school readers Women’s Adventure in Science. tions and models to study changes in climate, man- She is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society agement, and other land-use changes that influence and the American Geophysical Union and a member carbon and water cycling across a region over seasons to of the National Academy of Sciences. She received her decades. Dr. Law is the science chair of the AmeriFlux B.S. in applied mathematics and her Ph.D. in meteo- network, which provides continuous observations of rology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ecosystem level exchanges of CO2, water, and energy (MIT). at more than 100 research sites in the Americas. She Michael R. Gunson is an atmospheric scientist and the is a member of the Science Steering Group of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program and the Science chief scientist of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Earth Steering Committee of the North American Carbon Science and Technology Directorate. His research Program. She also serves as the U.S. point of contact interests focus on understanding the physical and on scientific exchanges in carbon cycle science for State chemical processes of the Earth’s atmosphere using Department bilateral agreements with Italy, Canada, space-based instruments. He is the deputy principal and the European Union. She received a Ph.D. in for- investigator of NASA’s Tropospheric Emission Spec- est science from Oregon State University and a B.S. in trometer, which measures the radiance emitted by forest resources and conservation from the University Earth’s surface and by gases and particles in Earth’s of Florida. atmosphere. The data are used to study air quality and transport of pollution around the globe. Dr. Gun- Gregg Marland is a senior research staff member in son was awarded several NASA exceptional service the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge medals for his leadership and scientific achievements National Laboratory. In addition to research on the associated with space-based instruments that measure sources of greenhouse gas emissions and mitigation atmospheric radiative transfer, chemistry, and physical options, he helped define the methodologies and emis- processes. He received a Ph.D. and a B.S. in chemistry sions coefficients now used to estimate CO2 emissions from Bristol University. to the atmosphere. Dr. Marland served on the NRC Gemma Heddle is the carbon management adviser Panel on Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming and has been a lead author on several reports of the with Corporate Health, Environment, and Safety at Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Chevron. She is responsible for managing the devel- He has spent recent sabbatical years as guest profes- opment and deployment of Chevron’s new energy and sor at Mid Sweden University in Östersund and as emissions inventory system, for revising Chevron’s senior research scholar at the International Institute for greenhouse gas emissions reporting protocol, for lead- Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria. Dr. ing the European Union and U.S. focus areas of the

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0 APPENDIX E Marland received a Ph.D. in geology from the Univer- gating pathways of rapid carbon loss from terrestrial sity of Minnesota and a B.S. from Virginia Tech. ecosystems, including fire emissions and permafrost degradation. He is a member of the science team for Keith Paustian is a professor of soil ecology in the NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory and co-chair of Department of Soil and Crop Sciences and a senior the biogeochemistry working group for the Commu- research scientist in the Natural Resources Ecology nity Climate System Model. Dr. Randerson is a fellow Laboratory at Colorado State University. His main of the American Geophysical Union and a recipient of fields of interest include agroecosystem ecology, soil the James B. Macelwane Medal. He received a Ph.D. organic matter dynamics, and global change. He is cur- in biological sciences and a B.S. in chemistry from rently leading projects to assess soil carbon sequestra- Stanford University. tion in several states and to develop national inventories Pieter P. Tans is senior scientist at the Earth System of carbon emissions and sequestration. His research also involves the development of ecosystem and eco- Research Laboratory of the National Oceanic and nomic assessments to advise policy makers on climate Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, change mitigation. He is a leader on the IPCC and the Colorado. His research interests focus on inverse mod- Council for Agricultural Science and Technology task els and data assimilation, atmospheric chemistry and force on agricultural mitigation of greenhouse gases. transport, carbon cycle, and global climate change. His He is an editor of a recent book Soil Organic Matter group maintains the world’s largest global monitoring network of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations in Temperate Agroecosystems: Long-Term Experiments in North America (CRC Press, 1997). and provides reference gas mixtures to calibrate high- accuracy greenhouse gas measurements worldwide. Dr. Michael J. Prather is the Fred Kavli Chair and Profes- Tans has served on several advisory committees related sor in the Department of Earth System Science at the to the carbon cycle and climate. He has received several University of California, Irvine. From 2005 to 2006, medals from the Department of Commerce and is a fel- he was a Jefferson science fellow at the State Depart- low of the American Geophysical Union. He received a ment. His research focuses on simulation of the physi- Ph.D. in physics and a doctorandus (roughly equivalent cal, chemical, and biological processes that determine to an M.S.) in theoretical physics from Rijksuniversiteit atmospheric composition, including global chemical Groningen, The Netherlands. transport models that describe ozone and other trace Steven C. Wofsy is the Abbott Lawrence Rotch Pro- gases. Dr. Prather has played a leading role in interna- tional assessments of ozone and climate change. He has fessor of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences at served on numerous NRC committees and chaired the Harvard University. His work focuses on the chemical Planning Group for the Workshop on Direct and Indi- composition of the atmosphere, using data analysis and rect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Greenhouse modeling to understand sources, sinks, transforma- Gas Fluxes. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical tions, and transport of atmospheric trace gases. His Union and the American Association for the Advance- research group also develops airborne sensors to make ment of Science and is a member of the Norwegian accurate measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, and N2O. Academy of Science and Letters. Dr. Prather received He has chaired or been a member of several carbon a Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from Yale and cycle and NRC advisory committees. Dr. Wofsy is a undergraduate degrees in mathematics from Yale and recipient of the American Geophysical Union’s James physics from Merton, Oxford. B . Macelwane Award and NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal. He is a fellow of the American James T. Randerson is a professor in the Department Geophysical Union and the American Association for of Earth System Science at the University of California, the Advancement of Science. He received a Ph.D. in Irvine. Dr. Randerson uses trace gas observations from chemistry from Harvard and a B.S. in chemistry from ground- and space-based instruments and models to the University of Chicago. study the global carbon cycle. He is currently investi-

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