D
Summer Study Statement of Task

During the 1990s, the federal government supported a number of weather research and research-to-operations planning activities (e.g., the U.S. Weather Research Program; USWRP), to identify key gaps in the understanding and simulation of severe weather of all types and their societal impacts, seeking to accelerate the rate at which weather forecasts were improved. Priorities developed by the USWRP were the starting point for a number of efforts including field campaigns and testbeds. However, these priorities, which were identified in documents published by the USWRP “Prospectus Development Teams” (PDTs), were developed more than a decade ago.

This study will explore the status of weather research and the research-to-operations activities at the federal level. It will discuss whether USWRP priorities remain relevant and how they might evolve to better meet current interagency needs. The goal is not to critique USWRP documents written more than a decade ago or to provide a formal review of current planning documents, but rather to identify emerging agency priorities and opportunities for interagency collaboration. Using the PDTs and briefings on current agency activities as a starting point, the questions to be addressed include:

  1. What has been achieved?

  2. What has not been achieved?

  3. What is no longer relevant?

  4. What current issues were not anticipated when the PDTs were written (e.g., extreme weather in the context of climate change)?

  5. What could be done in the short term to reinvigorate agency and interagency planning for weather research and research-to-operations activities in the United States?



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OCR for page 167
D Summer Study Statement of Task Durng the 1990s, the federal government supported a number of weather research and research-to-operatons plannng actvtes (e.g., the U.s. Weather Research Program; UsWRP), to dentfy key gaps n the un- derstandng and smulaton of severe weather of all types and ther socetal mpacts, seekng to accelerate the rate at whch weather forecasts were mproved. Prortes developed by the UsWRP were the startng pont for a number of efforts ncludng field campagns and testbeds. However, these prortes, whch were dentfied n documents publshed by the UsWRP “Prospectus Development teams” (PDts), were developed more than a decade ago. ths study wll explore the status of weather research and the research- to-operatons actvtes at the federal level. It wll dscuss whether UsWRP prortes reman relevant and how they mght evolve to better meet current nteragency needs. the goal s not to crtque UsWRP documents wrtten more than a decade ago or to provde a formal revew of current plannng documents, but rather to dentfy emergng agency prortes and oppor- tuntes for nteragency collaboraton. Usng the PDts and brefings on current agency actvtes as a startng pont, the questons to be addressed nclude: 1. What has been acheved? 2. What has not been acheved? 3. What s no longer relevant? 4. What current ssues were not antcpated when the PDts were wrtten (e.g., extreme weather n the context of clmate change)? 5. What could be done n the short term to renvgorate agency and nteragency plannng for weather research and research-to-operatons actv- tes n the Unted states? 167

OCR for page 167