Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Steven R.J. Brueck, Chair, is the director of the Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM) and is a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, physics, and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. As CHTM director, he manages research and education at the boundaries of two disciplines. The first, optoelectronics, unites optics and electronics and is found in CHTM’s emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors, and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications. Examples of these unifying themes at work are silicon-based optoelectronics and optoelectronics for silicon manufacturing sensors. He is also a former research staff member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the Materials Research Society and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Brueck is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) TIGER (Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review) Standing Committee and was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Nanophotonics Accessibility and Applicability and Committee on Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies.


Paul McManamon, Vice Chair, is an independent consultant and works half-time as the technical director of the Ladar and Optical Communications institute, LOCI, at the University of Dayton. Until May of 2008 he was chief scientist for the Sensors



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Steven R.J. Brueck, Chair, is the director of the Center for High Technology Materi- als (CHTM) and is a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineer- ing, physics, and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. As CHTM director, he manages research and education at the boundaries of two disciplines. The first, optoelectronics, unites optics and electronics and is found in CHTM’s emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors, and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications. Examples of these unifying themes at work are silicon-based optoelectronics and optoelectronics for silicon manufacturing sensors. He is also a former research staff member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Labora- tory. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the Materials Research Society and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Brueck is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) TIGER (Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review) Standing Committee and was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Nanopho- tonics Accessibility and Applicability and Committee on Emerging Micro- and Nanotechnologies. Paul McManamon, Vice Chair, is an independent consultant and works half-time as the technical director of the Ladar and Optical Communications institute, LOCI, at the University of Dayton. Until May of 2008 he was chief scientist for the Sensors 

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seeing Photons  Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The Sensors Directorate consists of about 1,250 people responsible for developing new sensor technology for the Air Force. Dr McManamon was responsible for the technical portfolio of the Sensors Direc- torate, including radio-frequency (RF) sensors and countermeasures, electro-opti- cal (EO) sensors and countermeasures, and automatic object recognition. He has developed multidiscriminate electro-optical sensors, including multifunction laser radar, novel EO countermeasure systems, and optical phased-array beam steering. Dr. McManamon has participated in three Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (AFSAB) summer studies: New World Vistas (1995); A Roadmap for a 21st Century Aerospace Force (1998); and Sensors for Difficult Targets (2001). Dr. McManamon was instrumental in the development of laser flash imaging, initiating the ERASER program as a method to enhance EO target recognition range by a factor of 4 or 5. Dr. McManamon is widely recognized in the electro-optical community. Dr. Mc- Manamon was the 2006 president of SPIE. He was on the SPIE board of directors for seven years and on the SPIE Executive Committee from 2003 through 2007. Dr. McManamon serves on the executive committee for the Military Sensing Symposia (MSS). He is a fellow of SPIE, IEEE, OSA, AFRL, and MSS. Stefan Baur is director of Technology and Advanced Programs at Raytheon Vision Systems. His responsibilities include establishing critical technology roadmaps, developing Raytheon’s focal plane array (FPA) intellectual property portfolio, and managing an approximately 30 development programs. Prior to this position, he spent 15 years at the Raytheon El Segundo developing advanced EO systems. High- lights of his career include leading the technical direction of the Raytheon Land Warrior program, program manager of Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS), program manager of the core staring imaging model for Raytheon Airborne EO systems, program manager of Navy Shipboard Long Range IRST (Infrared Search and Track System), and manager of FPA test and design center. Mr. Baur serves on several internal Raytheon and U.S. government-sponsored committees that help shape the direction of future EO systems. He is a graduate of the University of California in Los Angeles. Valerie Browning is an independent consultant and subject matter expert for ValTech Solutions, LLC. She serves as a subject matter expert for a number of Department of Defense (DOD) and other government activities in the areas of advanced materials and alternative energy. Prior to forming ValTech Solutions, LLC, in December 2007, Dr. Browning served as a program manager in the Defense Sci- ences Office (DSO) at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). During her tenure at DARPA, she assumed full responsibility for the strategic planning, operating management, leadership, and development of multiple DOD

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aPPendix a  research and development programs providing innovative technologies in power and energy, radar, telecommunications, and biotechnology for diagnostics, thera- peutics, and chemical-biological warfare defense. Specific programs managed by Dr. Browning include the Metamaterials, Palm Power, Direct Thermal to Electric Conversion, Negative Index Materials, Robust Portable Power Systems, and Bio- Magnetic Interfacing Concepts Programs. She also served as the DARPA liaison to the DOD Integrated Product Team (IPT) on energy security and served as acting DSO director prior to her departure from government service. In addition to her time at DARPA, Dr. Browning spent 16 of her 24 years of government service as a research physicist at the Naval Research Laboratory. Her primary areas of research were thermoelectric materials, high-temperature superconductors, and magnetic oxide materials. Upon leaving her government position, Dr. Browning was awarded the Secretary of Defense Award for Outstanding Public Service. She is active in a number of professional organizations including the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society (MRS), and Sigma Xi. Most recently, Dr. Browning served as co-chair for a 2007 MRS Symposium on magnetic materials and was the Technical Program Committee chair for the 2008 Fuel Cell Seminar. She continues to serve on the Technical Program Committee for the Fuel Cell Seminar and Expo- sition and was recently appointed as a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. She has a Ph.D. in physics from the Catholic University of America. John Devitt is division chief of GTRI-Electro Optics Sciences Lab’s remote sens- ing group at Georgia Tech. He’s the former manager of the Systems Analysis and Test group in the Infrared Products Engineering organization at L-3 Cincinnati Electronics (CE). He has more than 20 years’ experience in advanced technology projects in EO-IR, optics, sensors, and related areas, including direct experience in leading both large-format FPA development and novel detector programs. He has led major research and development, manufacturing technology, and other advanced technology developmental projects with broad technical and economic scope at both L-3 CE and, previously, GE Global Research Center. This has involved coordinating multiple cross-technical and organizational groups within businesses, managing university and national laboratory subcontracts, and being a key inter- face with the major government agencies. In 1993, Mr. Devitt was awarded the GE Sanford Moss Award for Most Outstanding Test and Measurement Program. He has 12 U.S. patents and numerous publications. Mr. Devitt is a certified Six Sigma Green Belt and has an M.S. in physics from Ohio State University. He currently serves as chairman of the MSS Passive Sensors Committee and is on the SPIE IR Technology Committee. Thomas Hartwick is a technology and business adviser with long experience in technical management for commercial and government activities with emphasis

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seeing Photons  on research and development. With a specialty in electronics and optics, his back- ground includes R&D and management positions at Hughes Aircraft Company, the Aerospace Corporation, and TRW. In addition to participation in key business strategies of more than a dozen companies, he has served on numerous national advisory panels, including the Advisory Group on Electron Devices for DOD, review panels for the Defense Science Board and AFSAB, and various boards and committees of the National Research Council. Hartwick currently serves on five corporate boards and committees. Angela Hodge joined the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in November 2005 and is a member of the Senior Professional Staff. Her work focuses on sensor fusion and the investigation, development, and design of algorithms and models for target detection and tracking of air and space systems. This work includes the analysis of infrared sensors, radar, and flight test data. It involves the application of systems engineering and digital signal processing princi- ples. She has researched, implemented, and demonstrated performance for several designs. Prior to joining APL, Dr. Hodge worked as a civil servant and electrical engineer at various U.S. national laboratories, including the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate. She has published more than a dozen electrical engineering articles on sensor technologies for various journals and conference proceedings. The majority of that work focuses on development of sensors for detection of specific biological agents in fluids. On January 2, 2007 patent 7,158,067, “Analog to digital converter using sawtooth voltage signals with differential comparator,” for which she is co-inventor, was issued. Michael Hopmeier is the founder and president of Unconventional Concepts, Inc. He serves as technical adviser and operational consultant to numerous govern- ment agencies and commercial firms. Some of his current project areas include homeland security, chemical-biological incident response, combat casualty care, crisis response and management, operational medical support, unconventional pathogen countermeasure programs, space station technology and exploration as- sessment, federal agency protective measures, counterterrorism, integrated federal- civilian disaster response, suicide terrorism, terrorist motivation and societal analysis, training and preparedness, and Special Operations technology support. Mr. Hopmeier previously served as technical adviser and/or operational liaison for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, U.S. Air Force (USAF) Wright Laboratory, USAF 59th Medical Wing, U.S. Navy Amphibious Warfare Pro- gram, explosive ordinance disposal program, DARPA, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He has memberships in several organizations including the World Health Organization (WHO) Working Group on Stockpile for Counter-

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aPPendix a  ing Radiological Disasters and the Editorial Board of the International Society of Disaster Medicine. He is the first U.S. participant, Israel Home Front Command Search and Rescue Course, Israel, for which he received special commendation, Air Force Materiel Command and Air Mobility Command, support to Joint Chiefs of Staff Program. Mr. Hopmeier received M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Florida. Steven Jost is director of photonics, advanced systems, and technology at BAE Systems Electronics and Integrated Solutions. He has more than 35 years’ experi- ence in research, development, and production of electro-optical components and systems. Currently, he is responsible for the development of photonic integrated circuits, infrared focal planes, and EO components for military and commercial applications. With support from DARPA’s Electronic Photonic Integrated Circuit (EPIC) program, BAE Systems has been developing a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based photonic integrated circuit capability at its state- of-the-art foundry in Manassas, Virginia. He has worked in numerous infrared materials including mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), InSb, GaSb-InAs strained- layer superlattice, GaAs-GaAlAs quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), and both single crystal and polycrystalline lead salts, and he specialized in detector physics-surface passivation. Dr. Jost led the first U.S. technical team to successfully implement CdTe heterostructure surface passivation on long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) MCT production FPAs and developed a radiation-tolerant surface passiv- ation for InSb detectors. Currently his team is transitioning a novel heterostructure surface passivation for resonant cavity lead salt detectors to threat warning sensor applications. Dr. Jost received his Ph.D. in solid-state device physics from Princeton University. Linda Katehi is chancellor of the University of California, Davis. As chief execu- tive officer (CEO), she oversees all aspects of the university’s teaching, research, and public service mission; she also holds faculty appointments in electrical and computer engineering and in women and gender studies. Dr. Katehi chairs the President’s Committee for the National Medal of Science and is chair of the Secretary of Commerce’s Committee for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. She is a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of many other national boards and committees. Previously, Professor Katehi served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engi- neering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. Professor Katehi is an expert in the

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seeing Photons 0 following areas: development and characterization (theoretical and experimental) of microwave, millimeter-wave printed circuits; computer-aided design of VLSI (very large scale integration) interconnects; development and characterization of micromachined circuits for microwave, millimeter-wave, and submillimeter- wave applications including microelectromechanical system (MEMS) switches, high-Q evanescent mode filters, and MEMS devices for circuit reconfigurability; development of low-loss lines for submillimeter-wave and terahertz frequency applications; theoretical and experimental study of uniplanar circuits for hybrid- monolithic and monolithic oscillator, amplifier, and mixer applications; and theo- retical and experimental characterization of photonic bandgap materials. Some of her research projects that have created new directions in high-frequency frequency design include W-band power cube; novel packaging approaches for high-density three-dimensional integrated circuits (ICs); device and circuit approaches for next- generation wireless communications; MEMS for microwave and millimeter-wave applications; study of photonic bandgap substrates for use in frequency-selective structures; silicon-based on-wafer packaging for high isolation in high-density circuits; high-Q micromachined resonators for RF filters-diplexers; and MEMS transfer switches. Her work in electronic circuit design has led to numerous na- tional and international awards both as a technical leader and as an educator, 16 U.S. patents, and an additional six U.S. patent applications. She is the author or coauthor of 10 book chapters and about 600 refereed publications in journals and symposia proceedings. She earned her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Seethambal Mani is a professional member of the technical staff in the Sensors and Analog System Department at Sandia National Laboratories. She has experience in manufacturing and assembly of focal plane arrays. She has been involved in the hypertemporal focal plane array project involving tiled arrays. She has coordinated work toward integrating the tiles on a motherboard while developing and optimiz- ing processes between Ziptronix and Sandia microfabrication groups specifically in the area of precision singulation. She also carried out physical and electrical char- acterization work of the tiled assemblies received from Ziptronix. She continues working on this project interfacing with Ziptronix for the next batch of assemblies scheduled for later this summer. On the BTB project she worked closely with the TIS (Teledyne imaging Systems) group getting familiar with and understanding their process for assembly and detectors. She worked with the staff at Teledyne modifying their processes and procedures to improve yield for the large-area focal plane arrays their assembly process. She also worked with the Teledyne detector design and fabrication groups while reducing risk in their detector fabrication process using specially designed PECs (process evaluation coupons). She led reli- ability and failure analysis efforts for the BTB 2K and 8K focal plane arrays. She

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aPPendix a  has worked closely with Infrared Radiation Effects Laboratory at AFRL supporting the radiation testing of the BTB 2K and 8K arrays. Currently she is the principal investigator for the nanobump Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. This project is looking into developing a process for hybridization for smaller and smaller features and pixels in order to support large-area focal plane arrays. Prior to joining this group she has experience in the microsystems area in developing processes, technologies, and integrating components. She has worked closely with DRS pushing the state of the art developing hybridization processes. She has a Ph.D. in materials engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. C. Kumar Patel is a professor of physics and astronomy, chemistry, and electrical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also the founder and CEO of Pranalytica, Inc., a Santa Monica, California based company that carries out R&D and manufacturing and sells trace gas sensors for in situ detection of chemical warfare agents and explosives, systems for standoff detection of explosives (IEDs), and high-power mid-wave infared and long-wave infrared quantum cascade lasers for applications in defense, homeland security, and commercial systems. He served as vice chancellor for research at UCLA from 1993 to 1999. Prior to joining UCLA in March 1993, he was the executive director of the Research, Materials Science, Engineering and Academic Affairs Division at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1961 where he began his career by car- rying out research in the field of gas lasers. He is the inventor of the carbon dioxide laser, which is one of the most widely used lasers in industry. Dr. Patel received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1961. In 1988, he was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. In 1996, Dr. Patel was awarded the National Medal of Science by the President of the United States of America. Tamar Peli is currently associate director for Special Operations Programs and Signal Processing and Exploitation for the Draper Corporation. She has more than 25 years’ experience in signal and image processing with application to the De- partment of Defense and the intelligence community (IC). Ms. Peli has developed technologies for a wide range of platforms and sensor modalities including imaging and non-imaging radar from X band to low frequencies, IR-IRST-FLIR (forward- looking infrared), video EO-IR, multispectral-hyperspectral, and measurement and signature intelligence. Ms. Peli is leading Draper’s White Space Initiative in exploitation technologies. As the lead for the exploitation initiative, Ms. Peli is responsible for developing the technology roadmap, the business strategy, for ex- panding Draper’s role and business opportunities within the IC DoD community and its execution. Ms. Peli is a MSS NSDF (National Symposium on Data Fusion) committee member co-chairing the sensitive compartmented information session.

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seeing Photons  Ms. Peli holds an M.S. in electrical engineering from Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. She was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Sensing and Com- munications Capabilities for Special Operations Forces and is also a member of the Panel on Digitization and Communications Science of the NRC’s Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Committee. David Shaver is head of the Solid State Division at MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he oversees research in such varied areas as high-performance imaging sensors, deeply scaled silicon microelectronics, solid-state lasers, optoelectronics, photonics, superconductive devices, quantum computing, and biological agent sensors. His current personal technical interests have included development of photon count- ing sensors and three-dimensional integrated imagers, and technology related to trusted electronics. Before his present position, Dr. Shaver was responsible for bringing online a Class 10 silicon fabrication facility. He also led the Submicrom- eter Technology Group, which pioneered the development of 193 nm wavelength optical lithography and served as the technical champion for 193 nm on the Silicon Arsenide Lithography Technical Working Group. Before that he served as chief scientist and director of research for Micrion Corporation (now part of FEI) where he was involved in the development of focused ion-beam and laser-beam micro- chemistry systems for photomask, microcircuit, and flat-panel display repair and modification. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology in 1981. He also attended the Harvard JFK School of Government program for Senior Executives in National and International Security. Dr. Shaver is a fellow of the IEEE. Jonathan Smith is the Olga and Alberico Pompa Professor of Engineering and Ap- plied Science at the University of Pennsylvania, to which he recently returned after almost three years at DARPA. He was elected IEEE Fellow in the Class of 2001 for “contributions to the technology of high-speed networking.” He was previously at Bell Telephone Laboratories and Bellcore, which he joined at the AT&T divestiture. His current research interests range from programmable network infrastructures and cognitive radios to architectures for computer-augmented immune response. Dr. Smith serves on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technol- ogy Network and Information Technology Technical Advisory Group. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Sensing and Communications Capabilities for Special Operations Forces and is a current member of the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology.