E
Biographies of the Committee Members

JOHN T. BEST, Co-Chair, is the technical director of the Plans and Programs Directorate at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee. He is responsible for leading the Technical Excellence Initiative, being the point of contact for NASA collaboration and fostering of foreign technical data exchanges for the free world’s largest complex of ground aerospace test facilities, providing developmental testing of propulsion, aircraft, missile, and space systems for the Air Force, other Department of Defense (DOD) agencies, NASA, the Department of Energy (DOE), commercial interests, and foreign governments. Mr. Best entered the federal civil service at AEDC in January 1981, serving as a project manager for flight systems and space and missile systems tests and as a corporate planning engineer until 1989. He served as head of the Long-Range Requirements and Facility Planning Branch from 1991 to 1998, as chief of the Applied Technology Division from 1998 to 2005, was deputy director of the 704th Test Group from 2005 to 2006, and was director of the Capabilities Integration Directorate in 2006 and 2007. Before joining AEDC, Mr. Best spent nearly 9 years working for ARO, Inc., AEDC’s operating contractor. From 1989 to 1991, Mr. Best served as a staff specialist in the Office of the Deputy Director for Defense Research and Engineering (Test and Evaluation) within the Office of the Secretary Defense, overseeing the work of the DOD’s Major Range and Test Facility Base. Mr. Best is currently working with NASA on creating the National Aeronautics R&D Infrastructure Plan for the Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, which is part of the National Science and Technology Council. He holds a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering and a master of science degree from Auburn University. Mr. Best recently served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee for the Evaluation of NASA’s Fundamental Aeronautics Research Program.


JOSEPH B. REAGAN, Co-Chair, is a technology and senior management consultant. He retired in 1996 after a 37-year career at Lockheed Martin Corporation that included serving as vice president and general manager of the Palo Alto Research Laboratories and as a corporate vice president. His primary area of interest is technology development, and he has a broad range of experience in developing technologies in the sensor, software, cryogenics, instrumentation, materials and electro-optical areas. Dr. Reagan spent 25 years of his early career in the study of space radiation and its impact on space systems, the ionosphere, and the atmosphere. He was involved with the first satellite measurements of the aurora borealis in 1960 and led more than 20 space experiments for NASA and DOD during his career. He has been the principal or co-principal author of more than 110 published papers and the principal author of 4 chapters in technical books. He has been an invited speaker at national and international scientific conferences on 10 occasions. He has been an expert consultant to several U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and NASA committees in radiation belt physics and radiation effects on space and terrestrial operational systems. As the principal investigator (PI) of 4 scientific space missions and coinvestigator on 13 other missions, Dr. Reagan has been responsible for the development and successful deployment of complex space instrumentation. Dr. Reagan is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and has received numerous awards for his achievements. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in physics from Boston College and Ph.D. in space science from Stanford University. He was elected to the National



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E Biographies of the Committee Members JOHN T. BEST, Co-Chair, is the technical director of the Plans and Programs Directorate at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee. He is responsible for leading the Technical Excellence Initiative, being the point of contact for NASA collaboration and fostering of foreign technical data exchanges for the free world’s largest complex of ground aerospace test facilities, providing developmental testing of propulsion, aircraft, missile, and space systems for the Air Force, other Department of Defense (DOD) agencies, NASA, the Department of Energy (DOE), commercial interests, and foreign governments. Mr. Best entered the federal civil service at AEDC in January 1981, serving as a project manager for flight systems and space and missile systems tests and as a corporate planning engineer until 1989. He served as head of the Long-Range Requirements and Facility Planning Branch from 1991 to 1998, as chief of the Applied Technology Division from 1998 to 2005, was deputy director of the 704th Test Group from 2005 to 2006, and was director of the Capabilities Integration Directorate in 2006 and 2007. Before joining AEDC, Mr. Best spent nearly 9 years working for ARO, Inc., AEDC’s operating contractor. From 1989 to 1991, Mr. Best served as a staff specialist in the Office of the Deputy Director for Defense Research and Engineering (Test and Evaluation) within the Office of the Secretary Defense, overseeing the work of the DOD’s Major Range and Test Facility Base. Mr. Best is currently working with NASA on creating the National Aeronautics R&D Infrastructure Plan for the Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, which is part of the National Science and Technology Council. He holds a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering and a master of science degree from Auburn University. Mr. Best recently served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee for the Evaluation of NASA’s Fundamental Aeronautics Research Program. JOSEPH B. REAGAN, Co-Chair, is a technology and senior management consultant. He retired in 1996 after a 37-year career at Lockheed Martin Corporation that included serving as vice president and general manager of the Palo Alto Research Laboratories and as a corporate vice president. His primary area of interest is technology development, and he has a broad range of experience in developing technologies in the sensor, software, cryogenics, instrumentation, materials and electro-optical areas. Dr. Reagan spent 25 years of his early career in the study of space radiation and its impact on space systems, the ionosphere, and the atmosphere. He was involved with the first satellite measurements of the aurora borealis in 1960 and led more than 20 space experiments for NASA and DOD during his career. He has been the principal or co-principal author of more than 110 published papers and the principal author of 4 chapters in technical books. He has been an invited speaker at national and international scientific conferences on 10 occasions. He has been an expert consultant to several U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and NASA committees in radiation belt physics and radiation effects on space and terrestrial operational systems. As the principal investigator (PI) of 4 scientific space missions and coinvestigator on 13 other missions, Dr. Reagan has been responsible for the development and successful deployment of complex space instrumentation. Dr. Reagan is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and has received numerous awards for his achievements. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in physics from Boston College and Ph.D. in space science from Stanford University. He was elected to the National 90

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Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1998 and chaired the Aerospace Engineering section from 2005 to 2007. He also served as vice chair of the NRC Naval Studies Board from 2000 to 2004. WILLIAM F. BALLHAUS, JR., is the retired president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Corporation, an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to the objective application of science and technology toward the solution of critical issues in the nation’s space program. Dr. Ballhaus joined Aerospace as president in 2000 after an 11-year career with Lockheed Martin Corporation. At Lockheed Martin, Dr. Ballhaus served as corporate officer and vice president, engineering and technology, where he was responsible for advancing the company’s scientific and engineering capabilities and for overseeing research and engineering functions. Prior to his tenure with Lockheed Martin, Dr. Ballhaus served as president of two Martin Marietta businesses, Aero and Naval Systems (1993-1994) and Civil Space and Communications (1990-1993). Before joining Martin Marietta, Dr. Ballhaus served as the director of the NASA Ames Research Center (1984-1989). He also served as the acting associate administrator for aeronautics and space technology at NASA Headquarters (1988-1989). Dr. Ballhaus is a member of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Science Advisory Board. He serves on the board of directors of Draper Laboratory. He also is a member of the NAE and completed two 3- year terms as a member of the Council in 2007. Currently, Dr. Ballhaus serves as chair of the Space Foundation. He is an honorary fellow of the AIAA and served as its president in 1988-1989. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and the American Astronautical Society and is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He serves on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Advisory Council and served on the Defense Science Board (2001-2009) and the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (1994- 2001; co-chair, 1996-1999). He is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned a Ph.D. in engineering and his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering. PETER M. BANKS is a partner and chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for Astrolabe Ventures. Previously, he was CEO and president of Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) International, Inc., and partner of XR Ventures, the investment arm of the X-Rite Corporation. He served as the Dean of Engineering at the University of Michigan and was a faculty member of Stanford University and the University of California. While at Stanford, Dr. Banks led the Space, Telecommunications and Radio Science Laboratory of the Department of Electrical Engineering. He participated in several space shuttle missions through his role as PI for the Shuttle Electro-Dynamic Tether System and as a coinvestigator on the flight of Spacelab-1. Dr. Banks’s scientific interests are related to Earth’s upper atmosphere and ionosphere and, in particular, to the electrodynamics of these regions. In addition, he has studied many aspects of global environmental change from theoretical and experimental points of view. Many of his interests in space plasmas have been related to a number of space shuttle experiments devoted to exploring the behavior of an electrodynamic tether system in low Earth orbit. This work included attempting to understand the behavior of energetic electron beams injected into the ionosphere from the space shuttle. He has received the U.S. Government’s Distinguished Public Service Medal for his contributions to NASA programs. He serves as the chairman of the board of the Universities Space Research Association. He has also served on the boards of a number of start-up companies, including Triformix (Santa Rosa, California) and HandyLab (Ann Arbor, Michigan). Dr. Banks has advised the Euro-America funds and various federal agencies on work related to defense, space exploration, and national economic security. Dr. Banks earned a Ph.D. in physics at Pennsylvania State University following an M.S.E.E. degree from Stanford University. Dr. Banks is a member of the NAE and has served as co-chair of the NRC Committee on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. RAMON L. CHASE is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) consultant for Analytic Services, Inc. Mr. Chase consults for an advanced aircraft conceptual design activity under the FALCON program. He is a member of the DARPA government oversight team on science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. He previously supported DARPA Advanced Launch Vehicles, RASCAL, FALCON, CAV, and Immune Building Programs and is an expert in the following fields: aircraft, 91

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missiles, weapons (including penetrators), reentry vehicles, and spacecraft design and analysis; expendable and reusable space-launch-vehicle design and analysis; long-range strategic planning; investigative studies, space policy; hypersonics; and technology readiness assessment. Mr. Chase has written more than 30 technical papers on advanced space transportation systems, military space planes, single stage-to-orbit launch vehicles, orbital transfer vehicles, technology readiness assessment, and advanced propulsion systems. He is an AIAA associate fellow and has served on the AIAA Hypersonics Program Committee and the AIAA Space Transportation Technical Committee. Mr. Chase chaired the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Hypersonic Committee and SAE Space Transportation Committee. He received a master’s degree in public administration from the University of California. Mr. Chase served on the NRC Committee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs. RAVI B. DEO is the exploration systems research and technology program manager at Northrop Grumman Corporation. He has also worked as a program and functional manager for government- and company-sponsored projects on cryotanks, integrated system health management, aerospace structures, materials, subsystems, avionics, thermal protection systems, and software development. He has extensive experience in roadmapping technologies, program planning, technical program execution, scheduling, budgeting, proposal preparation, and the business management of technology development contracts. Among his significant accomplishments are the NASA-funded Space Launch Initiative, Next-Generation Launch Technology, Orbital Space Plane, and High-Speed Research programs where he was responsible for the development of multidisciplinary technologies. Dr. Deo is the author of more than 50 technical publications and is the editor of a book. He served on the NRC Panel C: Structures and Materials of the Steering Committee on the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics and on Panel J: High-Energy Power and Propulsion and In-space Transportation of the Committee for the Review of NASA’s Capability Roadmaps. NEIL A. DUFFIE is a professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, is past chair of its Department of Mechanical Engineering, and is past associate director of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics. His research in manufacturing systems involves integrating sensors, actuators, computers, and databases into advanced automated production systems. He has developed controls for self-guided inspection machines and welding robots, high-performance material handling systems, and automated finishing systems for mold and die production. He is studying highly distributed, nonhierarchical system control architectures to reduce cost, reduce complexity, improve the agility of large-scale production networks, and improve the understanding of their dynamics. His research at the NASA-funded Wisconsin Center emphasized automated agricultural systems and sensory feedback and operator fatigue in telerobotic systems. He works closely with industry and teaches courses on manufacturing systems, automatic controls, and computer controls. He coauthored Computer Control of Machines and Processes. Dr. Duffie received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is currently serving on the NRC Committee on NIST Technical Programs and previously served on the Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs. MICHAEL G. DUNN is a professor of mechanical engineering at the Ohio State University. He has previously worked for Calspan Corporation/Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory and Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. Since 1975, Dr. Dunn has pioneered the use of a short-duration experimental technique to obtain fundamental measurements on the vanes and blades of full-stage rotating turbines. Dr. Dunn has collaborated with researchers from every major engine company in the United States performing full- scale turbine research, providing them with useful data to meet their specific needs. An additional area of interest is the development of a laboratory technique whereby the fundamental data necessary for predicting the behavior of air-breathing propulsion systems when they are subjected to adverse environments can be obtained under controlled laboratory conditions. The two particular areas of interest were over-pressure and dust ingestion. Dr. Dunn was primarily involved in hypersonic flow. As part of 92

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this work, reaction rate coefficients for the important electron depletion reactions were experimentally determined at elevated electron temperatures. In addition to work related to Earth entry, rate coefficient data were also obtained for entry into the martian atmosphere. Dr. Dunn worked to obtain fundamental data on the use of electrostatic probes to measure electron density and electron temperature in collisionless and transitional flows. In addition to the technical work described above, Dr. Dunn was head of the fluid mechanics and propulsion section of the Physical Sciences Department at Calspan Corporation. In 1986, Dr. Dunn was appointed to the position of vice president, research fellow. He is an AIAA associate fellow, a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), recipient of the 1990 ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award, recipient of a 1992 Japanese government research award for foreign specialists, recipient of the 1994 ASME John P. Davis Award, and recipient of the 2009 ASME International Gas Turbine Institute R. Tom Sawyer Award. He received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering, an M.Sc. in mechanical engineering, and a B.Sc. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University. He has served on the NRC Panel to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research Proposals in Fluids and on the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology. BLAIR B. GLOSS is currently acting as a consultant to the Institute for Defense Analyses for the development of the infrastructure plan for the National Plan for Aeronautics Research and Development and Related Infrastructure. He recently retired from NASA after more than 41 years of service. His final position at NASA was as director of the Aeronautics Test Program Office, where he had responsibility for the overall planning, management, and evaluation of the Aeronautics Directorate’s major aeronautical ground test facilities and the Western Aeronautical Test Range and associated aircraft. His previous responsibilities at NASA included serving as council member on the National Partnership for Aeronautical Testing (NASA and DOD alliance); NASA co-director of the National Aeronautical Test Alliance (NASA and DOD alliance); and participant in the NASA administrator’s Real Property Mission Assessment in 2002. Mr. Gloss staffed the Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry, where he was a co-leader of the infrastructure team. He worked as the deputy to the director for the NASA Wind Tunnel in the Aerothermodynamic and Aeropropulsion Facilities Group Office and was the assistant division chief of the Aerodynamics Division (NASA Langley Research Center). He participated in the National Wind Tunnel Complex Project Office, which was charged with designing and building a modern wind tunnel complex for the United States. Other areas of responsibility while he was working at NASA included assistant branch head of the High Reynolds Number Research Branch and the National Transonics Facility Operations Branch. He is an AIAA associate fellow; received the AIAA Ground Test Metal in 2005; received two NASA Exceptional Service Medals; and is a graduate of the Leadership for a Democratic Society Program at the Federal Executive Institute. Mr. Gloss is a graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, holding a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in aerospace engineering. He has published 48 technical papers covering many topics in experimental and computational aerodynamics. MARVINE PAULA HAMNER is a visiting scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute and a professorial lecturer at George Washington University and Hood College. Dr. Hamner has more than 20 years of experience working and managing a variety of projects, from research grants to multimillion-dollar commercial programs, and holds patents in the United States as well as several other countries. She has worked for the Boeing Company and the Applied Physics Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University. As an engineer she was the High Reynolds Number Industry Representative on the NASA/Boeing/McDonnell Douglas High Reynolds Number Program. She has worked on projects in high-lift aerodynamics technology, hybrid laminar flow control and boundary-layer stability, wind tunnel design and test techniques, and analytical methods. As an engineering manager she was responsible for staff in aerodynamics/aerothermodynamics, air-breathing propulsion, rocket propulsion, flight test, and electronics and control. Dr. Hamner is an associate editor for the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. She is currently an associate fellow with the AIAA, where she serves on the Finance Committee and as the liaison from Finance to the Technical Activities 93

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Committee. She is a member of the American Physical Society and its Division of Fluid Dynamics and Topical Group Instrumentation and Measurement Science, the International Society of Automation and its Test Measurement Division, and the Ninety-Nines, Inc., the International Organization of Women Pilots. She received her B.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an M.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from Purdue University, and a D.Sc. from Washington University. WESLEY L. HARRIS is the Charles Stark Draper Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the associate provost for faculty equity at MIT. Before his appointment as associate provost, he served as head of MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Before MIT, he served as associate administrator for aeronautics at NASA Headquarters and vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. His expertise is in fluid mechanics; aerodynamics; unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics; acoustics; lean manufacturing processes; and military logistics and sustainment. He earned a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. and Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. Dr. Harris is a member of the NAE and is a member of the NRC’s Air Force Studies Board. BASIL HASSAN is the manager of the Computational Thermal and Fluid Mechanics Department of the Engineering Sciences Center at the Sandia National Laboratories. He has been employed at Sandia since 1993, both as a senior and principal member of technical staff (1993-2002) and manager (2002-present). He also served as manager of the Aerosciences Department and as acting senior manager for the Thermal, Fluid, and Aerosciences Group. He has primarily worked in research and development in nonequilibrium computational fluid dynamics with application to aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of high-speed flight vehicles. He has also worked in ablation for hypersonic reentry vehicles, drag reduction for low- speed ground transportation vehicles, and high-velocity oxygen fuel thermal sprays. As manager in the Aerosciences Department, he managed aerosciences research, development, and analysis, both in the computational and experimental areas, including having responsibility over Sandia’s transonic and hypersonic wind tunnels and its associated diagnostics development. Currently, he oversees the development of high-fidelity computational modeling and simulation capabilities in thermal transport, fluid mechanics, and shock physics. He is also the lead for the National Nuclear Security Agency Tri-Lab Support Team for the University of Texas at Austin’s PECOS Center for Hypersonic Re-entry. Dr. Hassan has been an active member in AIAA for more than 25 years and currently holds the grade of associate fellow. He has held a variety of leadership positions in the institute and currently serves on the AIAA board of directors as director-technical for engineering and technology management and deputy vice president for technical activities. Dr. Hassan has extensive knowledge of NASA’s capabilities and facilities and has served on a variety of external review boards for NASA. Dr. Hassan has also served on a variety of university educational advisory boards, including the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M University and the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at New Mexico State University. Dr. Hassan received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. (aerospace engineering) from North Carolina State University. He served on the NRC Panel to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research Proposals in Fluids (2004 and 2005). JOAN HOOPES is a senior propulsion test engineer at ORBITEC (Orbital Technologies Corporation) and has more than 19 years of experience in complex system design, development, and integration. She has been instrumental in test operations at the Large Scale Test Facility. Her primary focus has been on programming, installing, and troubleshooting real-time control systems for facility operations. She has also been involved in the testing and development of several vortex combustion technologies at ORBITEC. Her previous work experience included 15 years of conducting test operations at NASA Glenn Research Center space test facilities, including the Rocket Engine Test Facility, the Cryogenics Components Laboratory, the Research Combustion Laboratory, and the Small Multipurpose Research Facility. Major test programs included solid hydrogen experiments for atomic propellants and zero 94

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boiloff storage of cryogenic propellants. Ms. Hoopes has overseen major facility upgrades and coordinated the installation of large electrical systems at the test facilities. She assisted with the relocation of several test facilities at NASA Glenn due to the Cleveland Hopkins Airport Expansion Project. She has also designed systems with safety as a priority⎯developing hazard analyses and operating procedures, complying with NFPA guidelines, and ensuring the calibration of equipment. Ms. Hoopes adds her expertise to several SBIR Phase 2 programs, including conducting tests for the flow characterization system hardware as well as writing control modeling software for combustion throttling. She has designed, created, and programmed numerous data acquisition and control systems. She has additional experience designing, installing, and integrating cryogenic, vacuum, and rocket engine instrumentation systems into ground-based test facilities. Ms. Hoopes is a former member of the JANNAF Test Practices Standards Panel of the Liquid Propulsion Subcommittee, a member of AIAA Hydrogen Committee on Standards, and co-chair of the Rocket Test Group. She holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. WILLIAM E. McCLINTOCK is a senior research scientist at the University of Colorado Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). In 1977 he joined LASP to develop rocket experiments for observing interstellar matter. He is a co-investigator on a number of NASA planetary and solar programs, including the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Experiment on the Cassini Mission to Saturn and the Mercury: Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, Ranging (MESSENGER) Discovery Mission. He is lead scientist for the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment, one of the four solar irradiance measurement experiments that was launched as part of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. He is also the PI for the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer aboard MESSENGER. Dr. McClintock’s research interests include the precise measurement of solar and stellar ultraviolet irradiance and ultraviolet observations of planetary atmospheres and exospheres. He obtained both a B.A. and a Ph.D. in physics from the Johns Hopkins University. EDWARD D. McCULLOUGH is retired from the position of a principal scientist at the Boeing Company. He received his professional schooling, mainly in nuclear engineering, through the U.S. Navy (gaining a certification for nuclear engineering). Mr. McCullough focused on concept development and advanced technology at Rockwell Space System’s Advanced Engineering and Boeing’s Phantom Works. He researched innovative methods to reduce the development time of technologies and systems from between 10 and 20 years down to 5 years. He experienced successes in the area of chemistry and chemical engineering for extraterrestrial processing and photonics for vehicle management systems and communications. These efforts included leading a chemical process development research team in a Skunk Works environment for 4 years. Mr. McCullough has led efforts for biologically inspired multiparallax geometric situational awareness for advanced autonomous mobility and space manufacturing. He recently developed several patents, including patents for an angular sensing system, a method for enhancing the digestion reaction rates of chemical systems, and a system for mechanically stabilizing a bed of particulate media, along with pending patents for a method for embedding heat pipes in electronic circuit cards, a method for expanding castings of nanoscale objects to arbitrary size. Mr. McCullough has served in a variety of professional societies and councils. He is a former member of the board of trustees for the University Space Research Association, a member of the Science Council for the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science, and a charter member and former chair of the AIAA Space Exploration Program Committee. Mr. McCullough is currently serving on the NRC Committee to Review Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies—Mitigation Panel, and has previously served on the NRC Committee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs. TODD J. MOSHER is currently the program manager for the Dream Chaser, Sierra Nevada Corporation’s (SNC’s) commercial crew vehicle, which recently won an award in the NASA Commercial Crew Development Program. Before that he was the director of spacecraft business development at SNC, 95

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where he helped win the Orbcomm Second Generation program with a satellite order to build 18 satellites with an option for 30 more. He also was the proposal manager and program manager for the Operationally Responsive Space Multi-Mission Space Vehicle. He has been with SNC since October 2006. Before working at Sierra Nevada Space Systems he worked at Lockheed Martin on NASA’s plans to return to the Moon, served as an assistant professor at Utah State University in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, worked at the Aerospace Corporation, where he also taught at the University of California, Los Angeles, and also worked for General Dynamics. Dr. Mosher has a Ph.D. and an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado; an M.S. in systems engineering from the University of Alabama, Huntsville; and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from San Diego State University. He has authored 50 professional publications (journal and conference papers). Dr. Mosher has taught students from around the world and advised several winning student competition teams. As an associate fellow he held many leadership positions in the AIAA. He was a finalist in the 2009 NASA astronaut selection. ELI RESHOTKO is the Kent H. Smith Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. His area of expertise is viscous effects in external and internal aerodynamics; two- and three- dimensional compressible boundary layers and heat transfer; stability and transition of viscous flows, both incompressible and compressible; and low-drag technology for aircraft and underwater vehicles. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, and aircraft propulsion. He is a fellow of the AIAA, ASME, the American Physical Society, and the American Academy of Mechanics, for which he served as president. He is co-author of more than 100 publications and is affiliated with many task forces, committees, and governing boards, and on several he served as chair. Dr. Reshotko received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and physics from the California Institute of Technology, a master’s of mechanical engineering from Cornell University, and a bachelor of mechanical engineering from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Dr. Reshotko is a member of the NAE and currently serves as the NAE Section 1 liaison members’ chair. His NRC service includes membership on the Committee for the Evaluation of NASA’s Fundamental Aeronautics Research Program, the Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-Fighter Aircraft, and the Committee on Assessment of Aircraft Winglets for Large Aircraft Fuel Efficiency. JAMES M. TIEN is the dean of the University of Miami’s College of Engineering. He formerly served as the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s (RPI’s) Yamada Corporation Professor, was founding chair of its Department of Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems, and was a professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering. Dr. Tien joined RPI in 1977 and twice served as its acting dean of engineering. In 2001 he was elected to the NAE. His research interests include systems modeling, public policy, decision analysis, and information systems. He has served on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers board of directors (2000-2004) and was its vice president in charge of the Publication Services and Products Board and the Educational Activities Board. Dr. Tien earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from RPI and his Ph.D. in systems engineering and operations research from MIT. Dr. Tien is currently serving on the NRC Committee on Assessing Medical Preparedness for a Nuclear Event—A Workshop, and served on several other NRC committees. CANDACE E. WARK is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), where she has been on the faculty for 20 years. She is a member of IIT’s Fluid Dynamics Research Center, where she focuses on experimental fluid mechanics, with particular interest in turbulence and bluff-body flows. Dr. Wark received the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1990. She spent nearly 2 years as a program manager for the turbulence program at the Office of Naval Research. Dr. Wark is an active member of the American Physical Society, the AIAA, and the ASME. She received a B.S. and an M.S. in mechanical engineering at Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at IIT. She has served on the NRC’s Panel to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research Proposals in Fluids. 96