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Committee and
Staff Biographies

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COMMITTEE

François M.M. Morel, Chair, is the Albert G. Blanke Professor of Geosciences and Director of the Center for Environmental BioInorganic Chemistry at Princeton University. He earned his Ph.D. in engineering sciences from the California Institute of Technology in 1971. Dr. Morel’s research is focused on trace metal biogeochemistry, particularly the role of trace metals in the growth and activity of marine phytoplankton. One of his current projects is on the effects of decreasing pH on key chemical and biological processes such as the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the availability of major and trace nutrients. He is a fellow of the Geochemistry Society and the American Geophysical Union and is on the editorial board of several journals. Dr. Morel has served on three previous NRC committees, and was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

David Archer is a professor in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. He earned his Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington in 1990. He has worked on a wide range of topics pertaining to the global carbon cycle and its relation to global climate, with special focus on ocean sedimentary processes such as CaCO3 dissolution and methane hydrate formation, and their impact on the evolution of atmospheric CO2. He previously served on the NRC Organizing Committee for the First Annual Symposium on Japanese-American Frontiers of Science.



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A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Franois M.M. Morel, Chair, is the Albert G. Blanke Professor of Geo sciences and Director of the Center for Environmental BioInorganic Chem istry at Princeton University. He earned his Ph.D. in engineering sciences from the California Institute of Technology in 1971. Dr. Morel's research is focused on trace metal biogeochemistry, particularly the role of trace metals in the growth and activity of marine phytoplankton. One of his current projects is on the effects of decreasing pH on key chemical and biological processes such as the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the availability of major and trace nutrients. He is a fellow of the Geochemistry Society and the American Geophysical Union and is on the editorial board of several journals. Dr. Morel has served on three previous NRC commit tees, and was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences. David Archer is a professor in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. He earned his Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington in 1990. He has worked on a wide range of topics pertaining to the global carbon cycle and its relation to global climate, with special focus on ocean sedimentary processes such as CaCO3 dissolution and methane hydrate formation, and their impact on the evo lution of atmospheric CO2. He previously served on the NRC Organiz ing Committee for the First Annual Symposium on JapaneseAmerican Frontiers of Science.

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APPENDIXA James P. Barry is a senior scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. He earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institu tion of Oceanography in 1988. His research focuses on deepsea biology and ecology, biological oceanography, the biology and ecology of chemo synthetic communities, climate change and marine ecosystems, polar ecology, and the biology of a highCO2 ocean. He is currently a member of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program's Science Advisory Panel on Investigations of Chemosynthetic Communities on the Lower Continental Slope of the Gulf of Mexico. garry D. Brewer is the Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser Professor of Resource Policy and Management at the Yale University School of Management. He earned his Ph.D. in political science from Yale University in 1970. Dr. Brewer is a policy scientist with broad expertise in natural resource and environmental management. Dr. Brewer has served on numerous NRC boards and committees, including chairing the Panel on Social and Behav ioral Science Research Priorities for Environmental Decision Making as well as the Panel on Strategies and Methods for ClimateRelated Decision Support. He was also a member of the Board on Ocean Sciences and Policy from 198385 and then continued from 198587 as a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Jorge E. Corredor is a professor of chemical oceanography at the Univer sity of Puerto Rico at Mayagez in their Department of Marine Sciences. Dr. Corredor earned a Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the Univer sity of Miami and a M.S. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison supported by FulbrightHays and IOCUNESCO fellowships. He is currently researching the biogeochemistry and genomics of carbon flux in the Caribbean as forced by large river plumes and mesoscale eddies. He is also working on the establishment of an ocean observing system in the Caribbean region. Dr. Corredor is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Scott C. Doney is senior scientist in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Dr. Doney earned a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in 1991. His research focuses on marine biogeochemistry and ecosystem dynamics, climate change, ocean acidification, and the global carbon cycle. Dr. Doney is also the chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program. victoria J. Fabry is a professor of biology in the Department of Biological

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APPENDIXA Sciences at California State University, San Marcos. Dr. Fabry earned a Ph.D. in biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1988. Her current research focuses on the sensitivity of calcareous organisms and marine ecosystems to elevated carbon dioxide and ocean acidifica tion, and the dissolution kinetics of biogenic calcium carbonates in the upper ocean. In 2004, Dr. Fabry presented testimony to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on the "Impacts of Anthropogenic CO2 on Coral Reefs and Other Marine Calcifiers." gretchen E. Hofmann is a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Hofmann earned a Ph.D. in Environmental, Population, and Organismal Biology from the University of Colorado in 1992. Her research focuses on the effects of climate and climate change on the performance of marine species, specifically on the impact on marine organisms of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations via global warming and ocean acidi fication. She served on the NRC Committee on the National Ecological Observatory Network. Daniel S. Holland is a Research Scientist at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. He was awarded his Ph.D. in environmental and natural resource economics from the University of Rhode Island in 1998. Dr. Holland's research is focused on the design and evaluation of fishery manage ment tools and strategies that will lead to profitable and sustainable fisheries and a healthy marine ecosystem. His research methods include bioeconomic simulation modeling, econometric analysis, experimental economics, and qualitative policy analysis. He actively participates in the development of fishery policy by working with fishery stakeholders and managers to develop and evaluate policy. He is also the associate editor of MarineResourceEconomics. Joan A. Kleypas is a Scientist III at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Kleypas earned a Ph.D. in Tropical Marine Studies from James Cook University, Australia in 1991. Her research focuses on how coral reefs and other marine ecosystems are affected by environmental changes associated with global climate change, such as increases in sea surface temperature and ocean acidification. Dr. Kleypas has testified at three separate U.S. Congressional hearings regarding the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems. Frank J. Millero is a professor of marine and physical chemistry at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sci ence. Dr. Millero earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Carnegie

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APPENDIXA Mellon University in 1965. His general research interest is in the applica tion of physical chemical principles to natural waters to understand how ionic interactions affect the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring in the oceans. He is presently involved in studies synthesizing the global CO2 cycle in the world oceans, including an understanding of the flux of fossil fuel CO2 into the deep ocean. He is also interested in the role of iron as a plant nutrient and its effect on the flux of CO2 to the deep ocean. He is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board and has served on two previous NRC committees. Ulf Riebesell is the head of biological oceanography at the Leibniz Insti tute of Marine Sciences in Kiel, Germany. Dr. Riebesell earned a Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Bremen, Germany in 1991. His research focuses on the sensitivity of marine organisms and ecosystems to ocean change (e.g., ocean acidification, ocean warming, changing redox conditions), the oceanic carbon cycle, the stoichiometry of marine elemental cycles, biomineralization, the biogeochemistry of stable isotopes, and paleoproxycalibrations. He has organized and participated in numerous international conferences on ocean acidification. STAFF Susan Roberts became the director of the Ocean Studies Board in April 2004. Dr. Roberts received her Ph.D. in marine biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley and as a senior staff fellow at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Roberts' past research experience has included fish muscle physiology and biochemistry, marine bacterial symbioses, and developmental cell biology. She has directed a number of studies for the Ocean Studies Board including Nonnatie Oysters in theChesapeakeBay (2004); DeclineoftheStellerSeaLioninAlaskanWaters: UntanglingFoodWebsandFishingNets (2003); EffectsofTrawling&Dredging onSeafloorHabitat (2002); MarineProtectedAreas:ToolsforSustainingOcean Ecosystems (2001); Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease (2001); BridgingBoundariesThroughRegionalMarineResearch (2000); and FromMonsoonstoMicrobes:UnderstandingtheOcean'sRoleinHuman Health (1999). Dr. Roberts specializes in the science and management of living marine resources. Susan Park was a senior program officer with the Ocean Studies Board until the end of 2009. She received her Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Delaware in 2004. Susan was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Graduate Policy Fellow with the Ocean Studies Board in

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APPENDIXA 2002 and joined the staff in 2006. She has worked on several reports with the National Academies, including NonnatieOystersintheChesapeakeBay, ReiewofRecreationalFisheriesSureyMethods, DynamicChangesinMarine Ecosystems,AReiewoftheOceanResearchPrioritiesPlanandImplementation Strategy, and TacklingMarineDebrisinthestCentury. Prior to joining the Ocean Studies Board, Susan spent time working on aquatic invasive spe cies management with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Manage ment and the Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel. She is currently Assistant Director for Research at Virginia Sea Grant. Kathryn Hughes is a program officer with the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Prior to joining the NRC staff, Kathryn was a Science Policy Fellow with the American Chemical Society. She received her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Michigan, and holds a bachelors degree from Carleton College. Heather Chiarello is a senior program assistant with the Ocean Studies Board. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Central Michigan Univer sity in 2007 with a B.S. in political science with a concentration in public administration. Heather joined the National Academies in July 2008.

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