Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

Workshop on the Role of Language in School Learning: Implications for Closing the Achievement Gap


October 15-16, 2009


AGENDA

Location:

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

 

Mariposa Lily Room

 

2121 Sand Hill Road

 

Menlo Park, CA

Goals: To explore the state of knowledge about aspects of language development that are critical to learning in K-12 classrooms and that may contribute to observed achievement disparities; to explore the state of knowledge on approaches to instruction that help students develop language for academic achievement; and to identify priorities for research and dissemination given the current state of knowledge.

Guiding Questions

  • What aspects of language development are critical for academic learning in K-12 classrooms? Why do these developments matter both in the early years of formal schooling (K-3) and for master-



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Appendix A Workshop Agenda Workshop on the Role of Language in School Learning: Implications for Closing the Achievement Gap October 15-16, 2009 AGENDA Location: The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mariposa Lily Room 2121 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA Goals: To explore the state of knowledge about aspects of language devel­ opment that are critical to learning in K­12 classrooms and that may contribute to observed achievement disparities; to explore the state of knowledge on approaches to instruction that help students develop lan ­ guage for academic achievement; and to identify priorities for research and dissemination given the current state of knowledge. Guiding Questions • What aspects of language development are critical for academic learning in K­12 classrooms? Why do these developments matter both in the early years of formal schooling (K­3) and for master­ 

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 CLOSING ACHIEVEMENT GAPS ing specialized language­ and literacy­intensive subject matter in the later elementary grades and beyond? • What individual differences in language experiences and abilities do students bring to K­12 education? Do these differences help to explain observed disparities in school achievement? • What do research findings suggest about how to intervene in pre­K and K­12 classrooms to develop aspects of language needed for school achievement? What is known about how to measure progress? • What are the most urgent priorities for research, from basic and translational science to dissemination research? In particular, what still needs to be understood about: (1) aspects of language needed for learning academic subjects, (2) effects of language differences on achievement gaps, and (3) instructional approaches or other interventions that develop essential language capacities for aca­ demic learning K­12 classrooms? THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009 8:00–8:30 Welcoming Remarks Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University Barbara Chow, Education Program Director, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation 8:30–10:30 Panel 1: Vocabulary and Academic Language M oderator: Claude Goldenberg (Committee Member), Stanford University Presenters: Erika Hoff, Florida Atlantic University Mary Schleppegrell, University of Michigan Commissioned Papers: Erika Hoff, Do Vocabulary Differences Explain Achievement Gaps and Can Vocabulary-Targeted Interventions Close Them? Mary Schleppegrell, Language in Academic Subject Areas and Classroom Instruction: What Is Academic Language and How Can We Teach It?

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 APPENDIX A Respondents: Nonie Lesaux, Harvard University Aída Walqui, WestEd Open Discussion 10:30–10:45 Break 10:45–12:45 Panel 2: Preschool Language Experiences and Interventions: Linkages to K-3 Learning and Achievement Moderator: Lynne Vernon­Feagans (Committee Member), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Presenters: David Dickinson, Vanderbilt University Carol Scheffner Hammer, Temple University Commissioned Papers: David Dickinson and Jill Freiberg, Environmental Factors Affecting Language Acquisition from Birth to Five: Implications for Literacy Development and Intervention Carol Hammer, Dual-Language Learners’ Early Language Development and Academic Outcomes R espondents: Jill de Villiers, Smith College Roberta Golinkoff, University of Delaware Kathy Hirsh­Pasek, Temple University Mariela Páez, Boston College Open Discussion 12:45–1:30 unch and discussion on Panel 1 and 2 presentations L 1:30–3:50 Panel 3: Explicit Instruction, Language Transfer, and Relations Between Oral Language and Literacy M oderator: Fred Genesee (Committee Member), McGill University

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100 CLOSING ACHIEVEMENT GAPS Presenters: R obert Bayley, University of California, Davis Aydin Durgunoğlu, University of Minnesota, Duluth John Rickford, Stanford University Commissioned Papers: obert Bayley, Explicit Formal Instruction in Oral R L anguage: English-Language Learners ohn Rickford and Walter Wolfram, Explicit Formal J Instruction in Oral Language as a Second Dialect ydin Durgunoğlu, Effects of First Language Oral A P roficiency on Second-Language (reading) Comprehension espondents: R Susanna Dutro, E.L. Achieve Guadalupe Valdés, Stanford University Open Discussion 3:50–4:00 Break 4:00–5:00 Discussion of Themes from the Day’s Presentations M oderator: Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford U niversity Open Discussion 5:00 Adjourn FRIDAY, OcTObeR 16, 2009 9:00–11:00 Panel 4: Language Deficits and Differences: Past and Future M oderator: Jill de Villiers (Committee Member), Smith C ollege

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0 APPENDIX A P resenters: William Labov (Committee Member), University of Pennsylvania Guadelupe Valdés, Stanford University Commissioned Papers: William Labov and Anne Charity Hudley, Symbolic and Structural Effects of Dialects and Immigrant Minority Languages in Explaining Achievement Gaps Guadelupe Valdés, Jeff MacSwan, and Laura Alvarez, Deficits and Differences: Perspectives on Language and Education R espondents: Robert Bayley, University of California, Davis Lisa Green, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Otto Santa Ana, University of California, Los Angeles Open Discussion 11:00–11:15 Break 11:15–12:15 Discussion of Papers in Light of Emergent Themes and Guiding Questions oderator: Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford M University Committee Member Respondents: Jill de Villiers, Smith College Claude Goldenberg, Stanford University William Labov, University of Pennsylvania Open Discussion 12:15–1:15 Lunch and continued discussion of the papers

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0 CLOSING ACHIEVEMENT GAPS 1:15–2:45 Practical Steps to Advance Research and Dissemination Guiding Questions • What research is needed to determine the role that particular lan ­ guage capacities play in academic learning, especially for certain subgroups that experience lower academic achievement? • What instructional approaches or principles emerge from the research for supporting the development of language needed for academic achievement; which of these are ready to move into practice? What translational research is still needed to meet the needs of today’s students and classrooms? • What syntheses could be undertaken to inform practice or a research agenda, including topics not covered in this workshop? • What entities might play a role in these research funding, synthe­ sis, and dissemination efforts? M oderator: Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University Committee Member Respondents: Donna Christian, Center for Applied Linguistics Fred Genesee, McGill University Lynne Vernon­Feagans, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Open Discussion 2:45–3:00 Summation and Closing Remarks Kenji Hakuta (Committee Chair), Stanford University 3:00 Adjourn