TABLE B-2 Leading Causes of Cancer Death in Women in the United States by Race or Ethnicity, 2006a

 

Estimated Number (Percentage) Cancer Deaths

All Women

Non-Hispanic White

Non-Hispanic Black

Asian and Pacific Islander

American Indian and Alaska Native

Hispanic

All cancers

269,819

219,585

30,222

5,810

1,230

12,777

Trachea, bronchus, and lung

69,385

(25.7)

59,723

(27.2)

6,622

(21.9)

1,081

(18.6)

296

(24.1)

1,609

(12.6)

Breast

40,821

(15.1)

32,114

(14.6)

5,631

(18.6)

830

(14.3)

160

(13)

2,054

(16.1)

Colon and rectum

26,628

(9.9)

21,183

(9.6)

3,419

(11.3)

595

(10.2)

106

(8.6)

1,312

(10.3)

aData are not age-adjusted.

SOURCE: CDC (2009b).

expected to be breast cancer and prostatic cancer, respectively. Lung, breast, and colorectal cancer combined were expected to account for over half the cancer deaths in women in 2008: lung cancer, 26.2%, breast cancer, 14.9%, and colorectal cancer, 9.5%. Pancreatic cancer and ovarian cancer were also estimated to be major causes of cancer deaths in women in 2008.

Trends

Heart disease, cancer, and stroke were the leading causes of deaths in women each year from 1989 to 2006 (CDC, 2001, 2009a) (Table B-3). Two notable changes over that period were the gradual decline in the proportion of deaths in women from heart disease and the increase in the proportion of deaths in women from Alzheimer’s disease. Deaths from unintentional injuries have also increased somewhat. The proportion of deaths from stroke appears to have declined from 1999 to 2006, but this change may be related partially to a disease-coding rule change that resulted in assignment to vascular dementia (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision [ICD-10] code F01) and to unspecified dementia (ICD-10 code F03) of some deaths that previously would have been assigned to stroke (CDC, 2009b). Proportions of deaths in women from cancer of any type were very consistent, accounting for 21.6–23.3% of deaths in women each year from 1989 to 2006, whereas deaths from respiratory disease gradually increased during this period. The proportion of deaths in women from diabetes mellitus remained generally stable but its standing in the 10 leading causes of death relative to Alzheimer’s disease and unintentional injuries changed. In recent years,



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