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Appendix B Committee and Staff Biographies Dr. Robert E. Black (Chair) is the chairman of the Department of International Health and the Edgar Berman Professor in International Health, as well as the director of the Institute for International Programs of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Black is trained in medicine, infectious diseases, and epidemiology. He has served as a medical epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and worked at institutions in Bangladesh and Peru on research related to childhood infectious diseases and nutritional problems. Dr. Black’s current research includes field trials of vaccines, micronutrients, and other nutritional interventions, effectiveness studies of health programmes, and the evaluation of preventive and curative health service programmes in low- and middle-income countries. His other interests are related to the use of evidence in policy and programmes, including estimates of burden of disease and the development of research capacity. As a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and advisory bodies of the World Health Organization, the International Vaccine Institute, and other international organizations, he assists with the development of policies intended to improve child health. He chairs the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group and the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative. He currently has projects in Bangladesh, Ghana, India, Malawi, Mali, Peru, Tanzania, and Zanzibar. He has more than 450 scientific journal publications and is co-editor of the textbook “International Public Health.” Dr. Black has served on four committees and the Board on International Health (now Global Health) of the IOM. Dr. Martha Ainsworth is an Advisor to the World Bank's Independent Evaluation Group (IEG). An economist, she was formerly the coordinator for Health and Education Evaluation at IEG and was the lead author of IEG’s 2009 evaluation of World Bank support for health, nutrition, and population since 1997 (“Improving Effectiveness and Outcomes for the Poor in Health, Nutrition, and Population”) and of IEG’s 2005 evaluation of World Bank support for HIV/AIDS (“Committing to Results: Improving the Effectiveness of HIV/AIDS Assistance”). She co- authored the IEG evaluation of support to primary education, “From Schooling Access to Learning Outcomes: An Unfinished Agenda,” issued in 2006. Prior to joining IEG in 2001, she worked as a researcher in the Development Research Group and the Africa Technical Department of the World Bank. She has published research on the economics of HIV/AIDS prevention, the impact of HIV/AIDS mortality on children and the elderly, the potential demand 145

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146 STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF U.S. GLOBAL HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS for an AIDS vaccine, and fertility and family planning in Africa. She co-authored the World Bank Policy Research Report, “Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic” (1997, 1999), and was on the core team of the World Development Report 1984 on population and development. She participated extensively in the piloting and implementation of the Bank’s first Living Standards Measurement Surveys in the 1980s in Africa, and is an expert on household surveys. Prior to joining the World Bank, she taught secondary school in the U.S. Peace Corps in Chad and worked for the Peace Corps evaluation office. She holds an M.A. in international studies from Johns Hopkins University, specializing in economic development, public health, and African studies, and a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University. Dr. Pierre M. Barker is professor of pediatrics at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He is the senior technical director for the Developing Countries program and the director of Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) HIV/AIDS improvement projects in South Africa—currently active in six projects in five provinces covering rural/urban and adult/pediatric practices. He is a technical advisor to Project Fives Alive! and works at a variety of health care facilities, ranging from urban tertiary care to deep rural primary care. Ghana’s Project Fives Alive! is sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce morbidity and mortality in children under five by 20 percent or more. Working first in the most-challenged regions of the north (Northern, Upper East, and Upper West), and then on a national scale, IHI and National Catholic Health Service work to improve health outcomes in this population while simultaneously enhancing—and permanently strengthening—the performance of the nation’s faith-based and public health structures. Dr. Barker grew up in Durban, South Africa, and returned for 2004–2005 to South Africa, while on sabbatical leave, to establish IHI’s projects in his native country. Outside of his IHI work, he is interested in pediatric lung diseases, is an attending physician for pediatric pulmonology, and leads health care system transformation projects for UNC Chapel Hill. Dr. Mary T. Bassett is the director for the African Health Initiative at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Before joining the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Dr. Bassett was the deputy commissioner for health promotion and disease prevention at the New York City Health Department. She joined the New York City Health Department in 2002 when she returned to New York City after many years based in Southern Africa. As deputy commissioner, Dr. Bassett oversaw a wide range of program areas, including non-communicable disease, school health and maternal and child health, as well as a network of District Public Health offices devoted to improving health conditions in low-income neighborhoods. Prior to joining the New York City Health Department, Dr. Bassett was the associate director of the Health Equity unit of the Rockefeller Foundation in Harare, Zimbabwe. As Associate Director, Dr. Bassett led the development of the Foundation’s AIDS program, which included support of research in treatment and care. For 17 years, she worked at the University of Zimbabwe Medical School. Originally from New York City, Dr. Bassett received a B.A. from Radcliffe College and an M.D. from Columbia University. She completed her medical training at Harlem Hospital Center and received an M.P.H. from the University of Washington. Dr. Ronald Brookmeyer is a professor of biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Public Health. Prior to this, he was professor of biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins

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147 APPENDIX B University. Dr. Brookmeyer’s research is at the interface of biostatistics and public health. A main theme of Dr. Brookmeyer’s work concerns statistical and quantitative approaches for measuring the health of populations. Dr. Brookmeyer develops statistical methods and models for tracking and forecasting health and disease. He has worked extensively on the development of methods for tracking the course of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. Dr. Brookmeyer developed the back-calculation method for disease forecasting and developed statistical approaches for biomarker-based methods for ascertaining HIV incidence rates in populations. He has also worked on issues of biosecurity, including epidemic models. His research interests in biostatistics include survival analysis, clinical trial design and analyses, and epidemiological and statistical methods for disease surveillance. Dr. Brookmeyer is currently the chair of the Statistics in Epidemiology Section of the American Statistical Association. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Statistical Association. A member of the Institute of Medicine, he has served on six prior National Academies committees. Dr. David D. Celentano is a professor and the chair of the Department of Epidemiology, with joint teaching appointments in the Departments of Health, Society, and Behavior and International Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, as well as in the School of Medicine. His research integrates behavioral science theory and research with epidemiology, in the study of behavioral and social epidemiology. While originally trained in a chronic disease paradigm (alcoholism and cancer control), he began his research in HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the early 1980s. In this regard, he has worked on some of the major cohort studies (ALIVE, MACS) in HIV epidemiology, as well as conducted intervention research in the United States for heterosexual men and women, injection drug users, and young men who have sex with men. He turned to international research in 1990, when he began a long-term collaboration with Chiang Mai University in northern Thailand. He and his collaborators have demonstrated that a behavioral intervention with young men (military conscripts) leads to a seven-fold reduction in incident STDs and halving the HIV incidence rate. In addition, the role of STDs and alcohol use on HIV acquisition has been shown through his research. More recently, his group has conducted a prospective study of hormonal contraception in relation to HIV seroconversion and human papillomavirus (HPV) incidence, a study with significant family planning policy and health implications. Today, he is the principal investigator of four studies supported by the National Institutes of Health in Thailand, focusing on interventions to influence the association between opiate use, methamphetamine use, and other drugs on HIV. He is the author of over 450 peer-reviewed articles. He is co-editor of “Public Health Aspects of HIV/AIDS in Low and Middle Income Countries: Epidemiology, Prevention and Care” (Springer, 2008). Dr. Celentano has served on three prior Institute of Medicine committees. Dr. Angela Díaz is the Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Pediatrics and Community and Preventive Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. After earning her M.D. in 1981 at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, she completed her post-doctoral training at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1985 and subsequently received a M.P.H. from Harvard University. Dr. Díaz is the director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center, a unique program that provides comprehensive, integrated, and interdisciplinary primary care, reproductive health, mental health, and health education services to teens. Under her leadership,

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148 STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF U.S. GLOBAL HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS the Center has become the largest adolescent specific health center in the U.S., seeing thousands of teens every year—for free. She is the president of the Board of Trustees of the Children’s Aid Society of New York. Dr. Díaz has been a White House fellow, a member of the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Advisory Committee, a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) State of the Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health Risk Social Behaviors in Adolescents. She serves on an advisory panel for the NIH Reproductive Sciences Branch. She reviews grants for the NIH Institute of Child Health and Human Development Biobehavioral and Behavioral Sciences Committee, the NIH Partners in Research Program, the NIH Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The NIH has awarded several major grants to Dr. Díaz and her research team at the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center. In 2003, she chaired the National Advisory Committee on Children and Terrorism for Health and Human Services. In 2008, she was elected as a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Díaz is active in public policy and advocacy in the United States and has conducted many international health projects in Asia, Central and South America, Europe, and Africa. She is a frequent speaker at conferences throughout the country and around the world. She has served on one prior IOM committee, and is currently a member of the IOM and National Research Council’s Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Dr. Loretta Sweet Jemmott is the van Ameringen Professor in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and the director of the Center for Health Equity Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She is one of the nation’s foremost researchers in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, with a consistent track record of evidenced-based HIV risk-reduction interventions. Dr. Jemmott, along with her research team, has received more than $100 million in federal funding devoted to designing and evaluating a series of outcome-based, theory-driven, culturally competent HIV sexual risk-reduction randomized controlled behavioral intervention trials with various populations, including African Americans, Latinos, Jamaicans, and South African adolescents, women, men, and families aimed at increasing safer sex behaviors. These trials have demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk associated behaviors while reducing the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). To date, four of her evidenced- based interventions have been designated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for national dissemination and have been translated into ongoing programs used both nationally and internationally by community-based organizations, schools, and clinics in high-risk urban areas. She has also worked extensively in South Africa and Botswana to help mitigate the magnitude of HIV/AIDS. Currently she is the co-investigator on four international NIH-funded randomized control trials (RCTs). In Botswana, she is the co-investigator on a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) funded HIV prevention research capacity building grant in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Botswana. She is also a co-investigator on two NIH funded RCTs focusing on adolescents and adult men, and a HIV prevention study focusing on Jamaican mothers and their daughters. She recently received funding as Principal Investigator from NICHD for a RCT barbershop-based HIV/STD risk reduction for African American young men. Since her induction into the Institute of Medicine in 1999, she has served on two committees related to HIV and STD prevention. Jennifer Kates is a vice president and the director of Global Health Policy and HIV at the Kaiser Family Foundation, where she oversees policy analysis and research focused on the

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149 APPENDIX B domestic and global HIV epidemics. She has been working on HIV policy issues for 20 years and is a recognized expert in the field. In addition, Ms. Kates oversees the Foundation’s broader global health policy projects and research, which provide timely policy analysis and data on the U.S. government’s role in global health. Prior to joining the Foundation in 1998, Ms. Kates was a senior associate with The Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm, where she focused on HIV policy, strategic planning/health systems analysis, and health care for vulnerable populations. She previously worked at Princeton University, where she served as the director of the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns Office, and was also the coordinator of the University’s Alcohol and Other Drugs Peer Education Program. Ms. Kates received her M.P.A. from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and a B.A. in political science from Dartmouth College. She also holds a M.A. in political science from the University of Massachusetts. Currently, she is pursuing a Ph.D. in public policy at George Washington University, where she is also a lecturer. Dr. Ann Kurth is a professor and the director of Global Health Initiatives at the College of Nursing at New York University (NYU). Prior to joining the NYU College of Nursing, Dr. Kurth was jointly appointed in the University of Washington (UW) School of Nursing and the UW Department of Global Health, where she maintains affiliate appointments. Dr. Kurth’s research interests include behavioral epidemiology and the development of tools to improve HIV and other sexually transmitted infection prevention, screening, and care. Her research evaluates informatics as well as provider-delivered approaches in studies conducted in the United States and internationally. She is principal investigator of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Gates Foundation-funded studies in Kenya, including a community-enrolled heterosexual couples’ cohort and a randomized trial of a computerized counseling tool to promote positive prevention and antiretroviral therapy adherence. Other current studies include an NIH Challenge grant to test the real-world effectiveness of a Spanish-language intervention for Latinos living with HIV in New York City. She is co-investigator or consultant on other studies underway in the United States, Uganda, Kenya, India, and Peru. Dr. Kurth founded one of the first HIV care clinics in the Midwest, and has served as president of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. She edited one of the first books published on HIV in women (1993) and reviews for a number of journals including serving as an editorial board member for STD. She was a founding member of the UW Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) behavioral core, and currently is an executive committee member of the NYU CFAR. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Washington, an M.S.N., R.N., and C.N.M. in nurse-midwifery from Yale University, an M.P.H. in population and family health from Columbia University, and a B.A. with high distinction (African Studies minor) from Princeton University. Dr. Dora Mbanya is a professor of hematology in the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Yaoundé I, and a consultant hematologist and chief of the Hematology and Transfusion Service at the University Teaching Hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon. She sees a cohort of about 1,500 HIV-infected persons in her clinic, with about a thousand on antiretroviral therapy. From 2007 to 2009, she participated in a study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health on the molecular determinants of neuroAIDS in Cameroon. In 1998, she was awarded a grant to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of nurses toward HIV/AIDS patients in a rural hospital of Cameroon. She has served in a number of workshops sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO). Dr. Mbanya was the chair of

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150 STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF U.S. GLOBAL HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS the WHO training workshops on the clinical use of blood and blood products in Namibia and Ethiopia. Dr. Mbanya also worked on the WHO-sponsored evaluation of the pharmaceutical management of HIV/AIDS in Cameroon and was recently (July 2009) jointly accredited as a regional laboratory assessor by the WHO African Regional branch, in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and A Global Healthcare Public Foundation. She is currently the national president of the Society for Women and AIDS in Africa, where she participates in reaching the community at various levels in an attempt to impact their lives positively. She has been an active member of the Cameroon Medical Women’s Association where she has held several posts of responsibility. Dr. Mbanya received her M.D. from the University Center for Health Sciences, Yaoundé, Cameroon, a Diplôme Universitaire in transfusion medicine from the University of Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire, and a Ph.D. in hematology from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom. Dr. Affette McCaw-Binns is a professor of reproductive health epidemiology in the Department of Community Health and Psychiatry at the University of the West Indies, Mona, in Kingston, Jamaica. Her research is concerned with the epidemiology of perinatal and maternal mortality in the Caribbean, as well as antenatal and perinatal care in that region. She recently published on “Integrating Research into Policy and Programmes: Examples from the Jamaican Experience” and evaluated the World Health Organization (WHO) antenatal care trial. She is a member of the WHO’s Maternal and Perinatal Health Topic Advisory Sub-Group on Classification System for Causes of Maternal Mortality and Morbidity. In 2009, she was awarded the University of the West Indies: Vice Chancellor’s Award for Excellence for all-round excellent performance in research accomplishments and contribution to public service. Professor McCaw-Binns received her Ph.D. in perinatal epidemiology from the University of Bristol in England. She served on two Institute of Medicine committees including the Committee on the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Implementation Evaluation. Dr. Geeta Rao Gupta is a senior fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Global Development Program. She provides advice to the president and leadership of the Global Development Program on their strategies and offers insight on managing projects to achieve the greatest impact. She advises the program on learning from those it aims to serve, and offers guidance on a range of cross-cutting issues and projects. Prior to joining the foundation, Dr. Rao Gupta was president of the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), a position she assumed in 1997 after serving in a variety of roles, including consultant, researcher, and officer. As president of ICRW, Dr. Rao Gupta was internationally recognized for her expertise on gender and development issues, including women’s health, economic empowerment, poverty alleviation, and gender equality. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including Harvard University’s 2006 Anne Roe Award and the 2007 Washington Business Journal’s “Women Who Mean Business” Award. Dr. Rao Gupta also serves on the Steering Committee of aids2031, an international initiative commissioned by the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS, United States Agency for International Development’s Advisory Committee for Voluntary Foreign Aid, and the boards of the Moriah Fund, the Nike Foundation, the MAC AIDS Fund and the Rural Development Institute. Dr. Rao Gupta has her B.A., M.A., and M.Phil. in psychology from the University of Delhi, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Bangalore University in India.

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151 APPENDIX B Dr. Douglas D. Richman is a professor of pathology and medicine at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Florence Seeley Riford Chair in AIDS Research. He is the director of the Center for AIDS Research at UCSD and staff physician at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. He trained as an infectious disease physician and medical virologist at Stanford, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Harvard before joining the faculty at UCSD in 1976. He has focused his investigation on HIV disease and pathogenesis for the past 20 years. His laboratory was the first to identify HIV drug resistance. The lab joined two others in identifying latently infected CD4 cells as the obstacle to eradication of HIV with potent antiretroviral therapy. Recently his lab described the dynamics of the neutralizing antibody response to HIV and the rapidity of viral escape and evolution in response to this selective pressure. Dr. Richman has authored over 580 scientific publications. He is also a co-editor of “Clinical Virology,” a state-of-the-art clinical reference book, and editor of “Antiviral Drug Resistance.” Dr. Richman has served as a consultant to the NIH, the Veterans Administration, the World Health Organization, and the State of California, and has been honored with an NIH Merit Award and the Howard M. Temin Award for Clinical Science and Clinical Excellence in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS. He served on the Institute of Medicine Committee for Examining the Probable Consequences of Alternative Patterns of Widespread Antiretroviral Drug Use in Resource-Constrained Settings. Dr. Deborah L. Rugg is the chief of the Monitoring and Evaluation Division at UNAIDS. Prior to joining UNAIDS, Dr. Rugg was the associate director for Monitoring and Evaluation for the Global AIDS Program of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. She was also an associate adjunct professor at Emory University School of Public Health. She was an assistant professor of health psychology at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and San Diego State University School of Public Health for five years prior to joining the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1987 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Division of HIV/STD Prevention. She has authored or coauthored more than 64 peer-reviewed publications and 27 major agency reports and publications, primarily in the areas of evaluation methodology, HIV prevention with adolescents, and HIV counseling and testing. She has a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin in physiological psychology, an M.A. from San Diego State University in experimental psychology, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine in health psychology. Dr. Rugg served on the National Research Council Panel on Data and Research Priorities for Arresting AIDS in Sub- Saharan Africa. Dr. Dawn K. Smith is a medical epidemiologist in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where she coordinates planning for potential domestic implementation of biomedical interventions to reduce HIV transmission (e.g., microbicides, pre-exposure prophylaxis) and serves as acting associate chief for science in the Epidemiology Branch. Dr. Smith began her career at CDC coordinating the HER Study, a multi- site longitudinal study of the effects of HIV-infection on women and collaborating with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)-funded women’s HIV cohort study, the WIHS. She then led the development of CDC guidelines for the use of non- occupational post-exposure prophylaxis and led the writing of a 5-year microbicide research agenda for the agency. She spent four years as the associate director for HIV research at the CDC field station in Botswana where she established clinical trial infrastructure with integrated

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152 STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF U.S. GLOBAL HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS sociobehavioral research and initiated PrEP trials. She maintains a strong research interest in the intersections of race, ethnicity, social class, injection drug use, and the HIV epidemic. Dr. Smith has served on scientific committees and review panels for NIAID, the Office of AIDS Research, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Smith received her M.D. from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and went on to complete an M.P.H. in public health policy and international health and an M.S. in clinical research design and statistical analysis at the University of Michigan. A family physician, Dr. Smith has practiced in varied settings, providing medical care in a Native American community; in an urban clinic with Hispanic, Vietnamese, and African-American families; and to HIV infected women at Grady Hospital in Atlanta. Dr. Sally K. Stansfield is the executive secretary of the Health Metrics Network (HMN), responsible for managing the technical and financial contributions of HMN partners to accelerate reform of health information systems for improved health outcomes on behalf of the Network and its host, the World health Organization. Prior to 2006, Dr. Stansfield was the associate director for Global Health Strategies of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. She draws upon more than 30 years of clinical and public health practice, with experience in research agencies, universities, governments, non-governmental organizations, and multilateral agencies. Dr. Stansfield's areas of expertise include public health research, policy, strategic planning, program design and development, evaluation, and the development of health information systems. She has designed and managed programs for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and Canada's International Development Research Centre, and has advised governments in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Malawi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (among other countries, primarily in Asia and Africa). Her many awards include the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honorary, the International College of Surgeons Award for Scholarship, the Public Health Service Distinguished Service Commendation, a Fulbright Fellowship, and the Yale Tercentennial Medal. Dr. Jane Waldfogel is a professor of social work and public affairs at Columbia University School of Social Work and a visiting professor at the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics. During the 2008–2009 academic year, she was the Marion Cabot Putnam Memorial Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University where she was writing a book about Britain’s war on poverty. She has written extensively on the impact of public policies on child and family well-being. Her books include “Steady Gains and Stalled Progress: Inequality and the Black-White Test Score Gap” (Russell Sage Foundation, 2008), “What Children Need” (Harvard University Press, 2006), “Securing the Future: Investing in Children from Birth to College” (Russell Sage Foundation, 2000), and “The Future of Child Protection: How to Break the Cycle of Abuse and Neglect” (Harvard University Press, 1998). Her current research includes studies related to work-family policies, poverty, social mobility, and income-related gaps in school readiness. Dr. Waldfogel received her Ph.D. in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and an M.Ed. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She has served on one prior Institute of Medicine (IOM)-National Research Council (NRC) committee and is currently serving on the joint IOM-NRC Committee on Strengthening Benefit-Cost Methodology for the Evaluation of Early Childhood Interventions.

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153 APPENDIX B Dr. Kathryn Whetten is an associate professor of public policy, nursing, and community and family medicine studies at Duke University. She is the director of the Center for Health Policy- Health Inequities Program, as well as the research director for the Hart Fellows Program. Whetten assisted in the creation of Duke’s Global Health Institute (DGHI) of which she is a member. Dr. Whetten’s research focuses on evaluating and creating models of health care for chronically ill individuals. The target audience for her research is health policy analysts and decision makers, administrators, and clinicians. Dr. Whetten’s area of study involves the identification of barriers to care, the creation of models of care that reduce barriers to care in a changing financial environment, the evaluation of such models, and engaging in the policy debate. Evaluation includes econometric models examining cost, health outcomes, utilization of health and human services, and satisfaction on the part of the patient and the provider. Much of Dr. Whetten’s current research focuses on two of the most difficult populations to serve: those living with HIV, mental health, and/or substance disorders living around the world; and children who have been orphaned or abandoned. Dr. Whetten has lead more than 15 federally-funded research grants and is the author of two books and more than 50 peer reviewed articles. Currently Dr. Whetten and her intervention, service, and research team have research projects that address issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, mental health, substance abuse, being orphaned, social justice, and poverty in the U.S. Deep South, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, India (including Nagaland), Cambodia, Malawi, Cameroon, and Russia. A few of the research projects are: “Positive Outcomes for Children Orphaned by AIDS,” “Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania,” “Integrative Treatment Model for Substance Abusing Women in Russia,” and the “North Carolina HIV/AIDS Training Network,” as well as collaborations with DGHI. Dr. Whetten received her Ph.D. in health policy research at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Catherine M. Wilfert graduated with distinction from Stanford College in 1958 and then attended Harvard Medical School. After completion of her residency at North Carolina Baptist Hospital, she returned to Boston to continue to work in pediatrics and medicine. In 1971, she came to Duke University School of Medicine, where she achieved the rank of division chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Professor in the Department of Pediatrics (1976–1994) and professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. In 1996, she left Duke to become the scientific director of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Dr. Wilfert’s work since the onset of AIDS has primarily been focused on the eradication of pediatric AIDS, and she is considered a seminal investigator in the field. She guided the National Institutes of Health AIDS Clinical Trial Group when the efficacy of using doses of zidovudine to reduce the incidence of mother-to-child transmission of HIV was accomplished. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV in the United States is estimated to be reduced to fewer than 200 cases per year. Dr. Wilfert now works to reduce mother-to-child transmission of AIDS in developing countries around the world. Dr. Wilfert has been on the editorial board of numerous publications and has served as a consultant for private companies, as well as U.S. and state governments. She is the recipient of many awards, including the 1997 Award of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions to Advancing the Prevention of Perinatal Transmission at A Global Strategies Conference for the Prevention of Mothers-to-Infants HIV Transmission. She also received a Lifetime Achievement Award in HIV from the Third International Meeting on HIV in India in 2001, and was given the Distinguished Award of Honor for Love of Humanity Especially in the Third World from the Cameroon Baptist Convention on Occasion of its 50th Anniversary Celebration in 2004. She was inducted to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1999. Dr. Wilfert

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154 STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF U.S. GLOBAL HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS has served on five prior IOM committees and on the IOM Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines Against AIDS. IOM STAFF Kimberly A. Scott joined the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Global Health in September 2005 as a senior program officer. She has worked on several studies and activities including the Committee for the Evaluation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Implementation; Planning Committee on Preventing Violence in Low- and Middle-Income Countries; Committee on the Assessment of the Role of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants; Committee on Depression, Parenting Practices and the Health Development of Children; and the Committee on Achieving Global Sustainable Surveillance for Zoonotic Diseases. She is currently the study director for the PEPFAR Impact Evaluation. Prior to IOM, she was an analyst on the health care team at the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Before returning to graduate school, she coordinated programs at Duke University’s Center for Health Policy, Law, and Management aimed at integrating mental health services into the continuum of care for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in 54 counties in North Carolina. For six years, she served as the Executive Director of a Ryan White-funded HIV/AIDS consortium, developing a comprehensive ambulatory care system for 21 mostly rural counties in North Carolina. Previous NC health-related committee service includes a number of advisory committees to the Governor of North Carolina and to the Secretary of NC DHHS for programmatic and policy issues related HIV care, prevention, and treatment. As an Echols Scholar, she received her B.A. in psychology from the University of Virginia. She received a M.S.P.H., with a concentration in health policy analysis, from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Bridget B. Kelly is a program officer with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health, where in addition to working on the PEPFAR Impact Evaluation she is the Study Director for the Committee on Preventing the Global Epidemic of Cardiovascular Disease: Meeting the Challenges in Developing Countries. She first came to the National Academies as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow. Prior to joining the Board on Global Health, she worked in the Board on Children, Youth, and Families as staff for the Committee on the Prevention of Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth, and Young Adults, the Committee on Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Healthy Development of Children, and the Committee on Strengthening Benefit-Cost Methodology for the Evaluation of Early Childhood Interventions. She received her B.A. from Williams College and completed an M.D. and a Ph.D. in Neurobiology as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Duke University. In addition to her background in science and health, she has more than 10 years of experience in grassroots nonprofit arts administration. Ijeoma Emenanjo is a senior program associate with the Board on African Science Academy Development. In this capacity, Ijeoma has spent the five years working on the Board on African Science Academy Development where he is primarily mentoring the staff at the National Academy of Nigeria on conducting convening activities and consensus studies. Ijeoma has also served as a Research Associate with the Board on Global Health for the Committee on the Assessment of the Role of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants. Before

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155 APPENDIX B coming to the Academies in 2004, he worked on policy implementation issues such as HIV/AIDS prevention policy and electoral administration in Anglophone and Francophone West Africa. Prior to his transition into international policy work, Ijeoma was a polymeric materials engineer at the U.S. Army Research Lab in Adelphi, MD, and at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology’s (Building and Fire Research Lab). Ijeoma received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering with a minor in economics from Howard University, and his M.P.P. from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Mila C. González is a research associate with the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Global Health where she has served as research staff for the Committee on the Assessment of the Role of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants and the Committee on Achieving Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and Response to Emerging Diseases of Zoonotic Origin. Before coming to the IOM in 2007, she worked as a clinical research assistant of a study evaluating the effects that exposure to violence has on young mothers with preschool- age children at the Children’s National Medical Center Research Institute in Washington, DC. She received an M.P.H. in global health promotion from The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services and a B.S. in physiology and neurobiology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Kate Meck is a research assistant with the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Global Health. She previously worked with the Committee on The U.S. Commitment to Global Health, the sequel to America’s Vital Interest in Global Health (1997). Prior to joining the IOM, Kate was a program development intern at AYUDA, Inc., an international non-governmental organization that provides diabetes education in Latin America. She has worked extensively with international health programs in South Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Kate received a B.A. in International Relations, with minors in Economics and Spanish & Latin American Studies, from American University in 2007, and is currently pursuing an M.P.H. in global health design, monitoring, and evaluation at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Kristen Danforth is a senior program assistant with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health, who recently completed work on her first study with the release of the report Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health (2010). She received her B.S. in International Health from Georgetown University in 2008, and is currently pursuing an M.P.H. at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Carmen Cecilia Mundaca is serving as an intern with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health. Before traveling to the United States, she was employed as the Head of the Surveillance Center of the Emerging Infections Program in the United States Naval Medical Research Center Detachment in Lima, Peru. In that role Dr. Mundaca lead the successful implementation of a technology-based disease surveillance system (i.e., Alerta) at sites across the nation and initiated the broad adoption of Alerta in five other countries in South America. Alerta is a partnership involving the Peruvian Navy and the U.S. Navy; and provided the mechanism for reporting of 45 diseases/syndromes via a telephone or a computer with Internet access. She also led the collaborative syndromic surveillance pilot implementation in the Peruvian Ministry of

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156 STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF U.S. GLOBAL HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS Health. Dr. Mundaca was part of the Early Warning Outbreak Recognition System (EWORS) Working Group and participated in several studies including a field visit to evaluate the performance of the system in Lao PDR. She obtained her M.D. from San Marcos University, Lima, Peru, and her M.P.H. degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, where she is currently pursuing her Dr.P.H. degree. Her dissertation work will be focused on developing a framework that will serve as a guideline for the implementation of disease surveillance systems in developing countries. She plans to capitalize on the knowledge and experience gained on this project to contribute on developing her thesis work. Dr. Mundaca successfully completed a Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the University of Iowa. Wendy E. Keenan is a program associate with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She helps organize planning meetings and workshops that cover current issues related to children, youth, and families as well as provides administrative and research support to the Board’s various program committees. Wendy has been on the National Academies’ staff for 10 years and worked on studies for both the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. As a senior program assistant, she worked with the National Research Council’s Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, Wendy taught English as a second language for Washington, DC, public schools. She received a B.A. in sociology from The Pennsylvania State University and took graduate courses in liberal studies from Georgetown University. Julie Wiltshire is a financial officer with the Institute of Medicine. Prior to joining the Institute of Medicine in 2004, she worked at Ernst & Young, LLP, as a financial auditor. She received a B.S. in accounting from Salisbury University. Rosemary Chalk is the Director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, a joint effort of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. She is a policy analyst who has been a study director at the National Academies since 1987. She has directed or served as a senior staff member for over a dozen studies in the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council, including studies on vaccine finance, the public health infrastructure for immunization, family violence, child abuse and neglect, research ethics and misconduct in science, and education finance. From 2000 to 2003, she also directed a research project on the development of child well-being indicators for the child welfare system at Child Trends in Washington, DC. She has previously served as a consultant for science and society research projects at the Harvard School of Public Health and was an Exxon research fellow in the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was the program head of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from 1976 to 1986. She has a B.A. in foreign affairs from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Patrick Kelley joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in July 2003 as the Director of the Board on Global Health. He has subsequently also been appointed the Director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley has overseen a portfolio of IOM expert consensus studies and convening activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evaluation of the U.S. emergency plan for international AIDS relief, the role of border quarantine programs for

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157 APPENDIX B migrants in the 21st century, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections, and the programmatic approach to cancer in low- and middle- income countries. He also directs a unique capacity building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over ten 10 years aims to strengthen the capacity of African academies to advise their governments on scientific matters. Prior to coming to the National Academies Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This responsibility entailed managing surveillance and capacity building partnerships with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator having lectured in English or Spanish in more than 20 countries and published more than 64 scholarly papers, book chapters, and monographs. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.

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