Appendix A
Biographic Information on the Committee for Review of the Department of Defense’s Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program Report

Mark J. Utell is a professor of medicine and environmental medicine, director of occupational and environmental medicine, and former director of pulmonary and critical-care medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He serves as associate chairman of the Department of Environmental Medicine. His research interests have centered on the effects of environmental toxicants on the human respiratory tract. Dr. Utell has published extensively on the health effects of inhaled gases, particles, and fibers in the workplace and indoor and outdoor environments. He is co-principal investigator of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Particulate Matter Center and chair of the Health Effects Institute’s Research Committee. He has served as chair of EPA’s Environmental Health Committee and on the Executive Committee of the EPA Science Advisory Board. He is a former recipient of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Academic Award in Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Dr. Utell is currently a member of the National Research Council Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He previously served on the National Research Council Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee to Review the Health Consequences of Service during the Persian Gulf War, and the IOM Committee on Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures. He received his MD from Tufts University School of Medicine.


John R. Balmes is a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and chief of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. He is also a professor of environmental health sciences at the University of California, Berkeley and director of the Northern California Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. Dr.



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Appendix A Biographic Information on the Committee for Review of the Department of Defense’s Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program Report Mark J. Utell is a professor of medicine and environmental medicine, director of occupational and environmental medicine, and former director of pulmonary and critical-care medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He serves as associate chairman of the Department of Environmental Medicine. His research interests have centered on the effects of environmental toxicants on the human respiratory tract. Dr. Utell has published extensively on the health effects of inhaled gases, particles, and fibers in the workplace and indoor and outdoor environments. He is co-principal investigator of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Particulate Matter Center and chair of the Health Effects Institute’s Research Committee. He has served as chair of EPA’s Environmental Health Committee and on the Executive Committee of the EPA Science Advisory Board. He is a former recipient of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Academic Award in Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Dr. Utell is currently a member of the National Research Council Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He previously served on the National Research Council Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee to Review the Health Consequences of Service during the Persian Gulf War, and the IOM Committee on Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures. He received his MD from Tufts University School of Medicine. John R. Balmes is a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and chief of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medi- cine at San Francisco General Hospital. He is also a professor of environmental health sciences at the University of California, Berkeley and director of the Northern California Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. Dr. 76

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77 Appendix A Balmes has been studying the respiratory health effects of various air pollutants for the last 22 years. He has a particular interest in occupational respiratory dis- ease. He has investigated the acute effects of inhalation exposures to ambient-air pollutants in his human-exposure laboratory at San Francisco General Hospital and the chronic effects of such exposures in epidemiologic studies with collabo- rators at the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley. Dr. Balmes also is investigating genetic determinants of re- sponses to air pollutants. He has led research, funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to assist in the development of a national pro- gram to link environmental hazards with health-outcome data to improve the tracking of diseases potentially related to environmental exposures. He has served as a member of the National Research Council Committee to Review the NIOSH Respiratory Disease Program and is a member of the Institute of Medi- cine Committee for the Review of the NIOSH Research Roadmap on Asbestos and Other Mineral Fibers. Dr. Balmes earned an MD from Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Michelle L. Bell is an associate professor of environmental health at the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies with joint appoint- ments in the Yale School of Public Health and the Yale Environmental Engi- neering Program. Her research addresses air pollution and human health through the integration of several disciplines, including epidemiology, engineering, and biostatistics. Her primary research focus is impact of air pollution and weather on adverse human health end points. She is also interested in the potential health impacts of climate change. She is the recipient of the National Institutes of Health Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) award and the Health Effects Institute Rosenblith Young Investigator Award. Dr. Bell earned a PhD in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Mark S. Goldberg is a professor in the Department of Medicine at McGill Uni- versity, Montreal. He is also an associate member of the Department of Epide- miology and Biostatistics, the Department of Occupational Health, and the De- partment of Oncology and a medical scientist at the Royal Victoria Hospital at the McGill University Health Centre. Dr. Goldberg is an occupational and envi- ronmental epidemiologist. His current research interests include the investiga- tion of occupational and environmental risk factors for breast cancer and the health effects associated with exposures to ambient-air pollution. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides, and he served on the National Research Council Committee on Health Risks of Trichloroethylene and other committees. He is co-editor-in-chief of the journal Environmental Research. Dr. Goldberg earned his PhD in epidemiology and biostatistics in 1990 from McGill University.

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78 Review of DOD Enhanced PM Surveillance Program Report Philip K. Hopke is the Bayard D. Clarkson Distinguished Professor in the De- partment of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and the Department of Chemistry at Clarkson University. He is also director of the university’s Center for Air Resources Engineering and Sciences. His research interests are primarily related to particles in the air, including particle formation, sampling and analy- sis, composition, and origin. His current projects are related to receptor model- ing, ambient monitoring, and nucleation. Dr. Hopke has been elected to mem- bership in the International Statistics Institute, and he is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also a fellow of the American Association for Aerosol Research, in which he has served in vari- ous roles, including as president, vice president, member of the board of direc- tors, and editor-in-chief of its journal, Aerosol Science and Technology. Dr. Hopke is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Inter- national Society of Exposure Science, and the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate. He has served as a member and chair of the U.S. Envi- ronmental Protection Agency Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee and as a member of several National Research Council committees, most recently the Committee on Energy Futures and Air Pollution in Urban China and the United States, the Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter, and the Committee on Air Quality Management in the United States. Dr. Hopke received his PhD in chemistry from Princeton University. Petros Koutrakis is a professor of environmental sciences and director of the Exposure, Epidemiology, and Risk Program at Harvard University. He is also the director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-Harvard University Ambient Particle Center. Dr. Koutrakis’s research interests include human expo- sure assessment, ambient and indoor air pollution, environmental analytical chemistry, and environmental management. He has more than 180 peer- reviewed publications and nine patents, and he has conducted a number of com- prehensive air-pollution studies in the United States, Canada, Spain, Kuwait, Chile, and Greece. Dr. Koutrakis is the past technical editor-in-chief of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association. He is a member of several national and international committees, and he has served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Par- ticulate Matter. Dr. Koutrakis received his PhD in environmental chemistry from the University of Paris. Jacob D. McDonald is a scientist and director of the Chemistry and Inhalation Exposure Program at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. He conducts re- search that bridges his education and experience in analytical chemistry, aerosol science, and toxicology. Dr. McDonald has experience in the aerosolization and vaporization of gases and particles for a wide array of applications. He has an interest in developing laboratory exposures that represent “real-world” condi- tions and conducting characterizations of these exposures that allow toxicity results to be placed in the context of human exposures to environmental pollut-

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79 Appendix A ants or drug products. His work spans the study of complex mixtures, respiratory drug delivery, animal-model development, and metabolism in mammals. He is a member of the American Association for Aerosol Research, the Society of Toxi- cology, and the American Chemical Society. Dr. McDonald earned a PhD in environmental chemistry and toxicology from the University of Nevada. Kent E. Pinkerton is a professor of pediatric medicine and anatomy, physiology, and cell biology at the University of California, Davis. He also serves as director of the university’s Center for Health and the Environment. His research interests focus on the health effects of environmental air pollutants on lung structure and function, the interaction of gases and airborne particles in specific sites and cell populations of the lungs in acute and chronic lung injury, and the effects of environmental tobacco smoke on lung growth and development. Dr. Pinkerton is a member of the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Toxicology. He has served as a member of the Chemical Safety Advisory Committee; the Long-Range Planning Committee for the American Thoracic Society; and the National Re- search Council Committee on Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction Benefits from Decreasing Tropospheric Ozone Exposure. Dr. Pinkerton received a PhD in pathology from Duke University. Bailus Walker is a professor of environmental and occupational medicine and toxicology at Howard University College of Medicine. His research interests in- clude lead toxicity and environmental carcinogenesis. Dr. Walker has served as commissioner of public health for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, chairman of the Massachusetts Public Health Council, and state director of public health for Michigan. He is past president of the American Public Health Association and a distinguished fellow of the Royal Society of Health and the American College of Epidemiology. Dr. Walker is a senior science adviser for environmental health to the National Library of Medicine and a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has also served on several National Research Council committees, most recently the Committee on Improving Risk Analysis Approaches Used by the U.S. EPA, the Committee on Mine Placement of Coal Combustion Wastes, and the Commit- tee on Toxicology. Dr. Walker received a PhD in occupational and environmental medicine from the University of Minnesota. Anthony S. Wexler is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aero- nautical Engineering, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at the University of Cali- fornia, Davis. He is also director of the university’s Air Quality Research Cen- ter. Dr. Wexler’s research focuses on understanding the atmospheric processes that transport and transform particulate pollutants from emission to reception. He is also interested in the deposition of aerosol particles in human airways and the dynamic response of muscles to stimulation. Dr. Wexler has served on the Editorial Boards of Aerosol Science and Technology and Atmospheric Environ- ment. He has also been the recipient of numerous honors, including the Dean’s

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80 Review of DOD Enhanced PM Surveillance Program Report Special Merit Award (1991-1998) and the Provost’s Special Merit Award (1993, 1996, and 1999) at the University of Delaware. Dr. Wexler received a PhD in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology.