• Promising potential in federated/distributed approaches that allow data to remain local while still enabling querying and pooling of summary data across systems.
  • Ongoing innovation in search technologies with the potential to accelerate use of available data from multiple sources for new insights.
  • Meaningful use criteria and health reform provisions that provide starting points and incentives for the development of a learning system for quality improvement and population health, while underscoring the need to be strategic on issues and opportunities, while maintaining flexibility to accommodate breakthrough capacities.
  • Need for careful attention to limiting the burden for health data collection to the issues most important to patient care and knowledge generation.
  • Requirement for governance policies that foster the data utility for the common good, cultivate the trust fabric with the public and between data sharing entities, and accelerate collaborative progress.
  • Availability of standards for aggregation of large pools of data for purposes such as CER, biomarker validation, disease modeling, and improving research processes.

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WORKSHOP #1: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, PRIORITIES

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July 27–28, 2010

Venable Conference Facility
575 Seventh Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

Day One: Tuesday, July 27

8:00am Coffee and light breakfast available

8:30am

Welcome, introductions, and overview
Welcome, framing of the meeting and workshop series, agenda overview

o  Michael McGinnis (Institute of Medicine)

o  Charles Friedman (Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT)

o  Laura Adams (Planning Committee Chair, Rhode Island Quality Institute)



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