FIGURE 1-3 Hypothetical data on snow depth as a function of elevation. Top: illustrates one case of the generated data, and the estimated slope between snow depth and elevation, using simple linear regression (red line), and an approach that accounts for the spatial correlation of the data (green line). Middle: illustrates the probability distribution of the trend of snow depth with elevation using the two approaches. Bottom: demonstrates that if the experiment were repeated many times, one would erroneously conclude that there was a relationship between snow depth and elevation too often if using simple linear regression. Figure courtesy of Anna Michalak, University of Michigan. Original figure by Tyler Erickson, Michigan Tech Research Institute.

FIGURE 1-3 Hypothetical data on snow depth as a function of elevation. Top: illustrates one case of the generated data, and the estimated slope between snow depth and elevation, using simple linear regression (red line), and an approach that accounts for the spatial correlation of the data (green line). Middle: illustrates the probability distribution of the trend of snow depth with elevation using the two approaches. Bottom: demonstrates that if the experiment were repeated many times, one would erroneously conclude that there was a relationship between snow depth and elevation too often if using simple linear regression. Figure courtesy of Anna Michalak, University of Michigan. Original figure by Tyler Erickson, Michigan Tech Research Institute.



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