Appendix A
Committee Biographies

J. Jerome Holton, Chair, is senior systems engineer with the Tauri Group, where he supports the BioWatch Systems Program Office in the Office of Health Affairs, Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He provides analysis, advice, and counsel to senior government decision makers on policy, technology, and operations issues related to weapons of mass destruction and their effects on civilian infrastructure, first responders, military forces, and tactical operations. Before that, he served in a variety of leadership positions for private companies, from scientific research start-ups to large management consulting firms. Past clients include the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Counterproliferation and Chemical/Biological Defense, the Chemical Biological Defense Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the Chemical Biological National Security Program of the Department of Energy, the DHS Science and Technology Directorate, and the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO). His work extends broadly across the chemical/biological/radiological/nuclear/conventional explosives (CBRNE) detection and countermeasures arena. For several years, he focused on the counterproliferation of, counterterrorism/domestic preparedness issues for, and the detection, identification, and decontamination of chemical and biological weapons. Recent accomplishments include fielding information operations tools and enhancing intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities to detect and defeat improvised explosive devices as well as the development of applique armor solutions to counter explosively formed penetrators. Dr. Holton previously served the NRC as a member of its the Standing Committee for Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER), the Committee for the Symposium on Avoiding Technology Surprise for Tomorrow’s Warfighter, and the Committee



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Appendix A Committee Biographies j. jerome Holton, Chair, is senior systems engineer with the Tauri Group, where he supports the BioWatch Systems Program Office in the Office of Health Affairs, Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He provides analysis, advice, and counsel to senior government decision makers on policy, technology, and operations issues related to weapons of mass destruction and their effects on civilian infrastructure, first responders, military forces, and tactical operations. Before that, he served in a variety of leadership positions for private companies, from scientific research start-ups to large management consulting firms. Past clients include the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Counterproliferation and Chemical/Biological Defense, the Chemical Biologi - cal Defense Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the Chemical Biological National Security Program of the Department of Energy, the DHS Science and Technology Directorate, and the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO). His work extends broadly across the chemical/ biological/radiological/nuclear/conventional explosives (CBRNE) detection and countermeasures arena. For several years, he focused on the counterproliferation of, counterterrorism/domestic preparedness issues for, and the detection, iden - tification, and decontamination of chemical and biological weapons. Recent accomplishments include fielding information operations tools and enhancing intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities to detect and defeat improvised explosive devices as well as the development of applique armor solu- tions to counter explosively formed penetrators. Dr. Holton previously served the NRC as a member of its the Standing Committee for Technology Insight— Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER), the Committee for the Symposium on Avoiding Technology Surprise for Tomorrow’s Warfighter, and the Committee 

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 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER—00 on Alternative Technologies to Replace Antipersonnel Landmines. He earned his B.S. in physics from Mississippi State University and holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in experimental physics from Duke University. Ruth A. David, NAE, Vice Chair, is president and chief executive officer of Analytic Services, Inc., a nonprofit research institute focusing on national security, homeland security, and public safety issues. She initiated a corporate focus on homeland security in 1999 and established the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security early in 2001; today the corporation operates the Homeland Security Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security, in addition to the ANSER business unit. Before assuming her current position in 1998, Dr. David was deputy director for science and technology at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). As technical advisor to the Director of Central Intelligence, she was responsible for research, development, and deployment of technologies in support of all phases of the intel- ligence process. Dr. David currently serves on the National Academy of Engineer- ing Council as well as on several committees of the National Research Council (NRC); she chairs the NRC Standing Committee for Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER) and the Board on Global Science and Technology. She is a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, first established to advise the President, and now advising the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. She also serves on the National Security Agency Advisory Board, the Hertz Foundation Board, and the Wichita State University Foundation National Advisory Committee and is a member of the Draper Corporation. Pre- viously, Dr. David served in several leadership positions at the Sandia National Laboratories, where she began her professional career in 1975. Dr. David received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Wichita State Univer- sity, and a master of science degree and a doctorate in electrical engineering from Stanford University. brian ballard is the director of product development and vice president at Berico Tailored Systems (BTS), where he leads the development of defense-oriented aug- mented reality and data fusion applications. As part of his portfolio, he is heavily engaged in developing mobile 3G and 4G networks for tactical military employ - ments. Prior to joining BTS, Mr. Ballard served as the chief technology officer at Mav6, where he was involved in the development of emerging networking and embedded systems technologies for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems and applications in government and military. He is a highly expe - rienced professional in the field of national intelligence systems and computer engineering. Employed for more than 10 years with the National Security Agency, Mr. Ballard has dealt with all forms of data collection, dissemination, processing, and visualization. As a field operations officer at the National Security Adminis - tration, he was a member and team leader in the Office of Target Reconnaissance

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 APPENDIX A and Surveillance. Mr. Ballard holds an M.S. and a B.S. in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a master’s of technology man - agement from the University of Maryland. He is currently working on an MBA at the University of Maryland. Alan H. Epstein, NAE, is the vice president of technology and environment at Pratt & Whitney, where he is responsible for setting the direction for and coordi- nating technology across the company as it applies to product performance and environmental impact. Previously he was the R.C. Maclaurin Professor of Aero- nautics and Astronautics and the director of the Gas Turbine Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His responsibilities there included teach - ing and research in aerospace propulsion, power production, fluid mechanics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). He was an active consultant to industry and government for more than 30 years on topics including gas turbine and rocket engines, MEMS, system testing, military infrared systems, and vehicle observable technology. Dr. Epstein is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is a former member of the NRC Air Force Science and Technology Board and of the DARPA Defense Science Research Council. He is currently chair of the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in aeronautics and astronautics. john gannon is president for Information Solutions at BAE Systems. He previ- ously served as vice president for Global Analysis, a business area within BAE Systems Information Solutions. Dr. Gannon joined BAE Systems after serving as staff director of the House of Representatives Homeland Security Committee, the first new committee established by Congress in more than 30 years. In 2002- 2003, he was a team leader in the White House’s Transitional Planning Office for the Department of Homeland Security. He served previously in the senior-most analytic positions in the intelligence community, including as the CIA’s director of European analysis, deputy director for intelligence, chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production. In the private sector, he developed the analytic workforce for Intellibridge Corporation, a web-based provider of outsourced analysis for gov - ernment and corporate clients. Dr. Gannon served as a naval officer in Southeast Asia and later in several Naval Reserve commands, retiring as a captain. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, and master’s and doctorate degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He is an adjunct professor in the National Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. Christopher C. green is assistant dean for Asia Pacific of the Wayne State University School of Medicine (SOM). He is also a clinical fellow and professor

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 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER—00 in neuroimaging/magnetic resonance imaging in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences of the SOM and the Detroit Medical Center (DMC). His medical specialties are brain imaging and forensic neurology, and his personal medical practice is in the differential diagnoses of neurodegenerative disease. He has served and continues to serve on many government advisory groups and private sector corporate boards of directors. Immediately prior to his current position, he was executive director for emergent technology research for the SOM/DMC. From 1985 through 2004 he was executive director, Global Technology Policy, and chief technology offi - cer for General Motors’ Asia-Pacific Operations. His career at General Motors included positions as head, Biomedical Sciences Research, and executive director, General Motors Research Laboratory for Materials and Environmental Sciences. His career with the CIA extended from 1969 to 1985 as a senior division analyst and assistant national intelligence officer for science and technology. His Ph.D. is from the University of Colorado Medical School in neurophysiology, and his M.D. is from the Autonomous City University in El Paso, Texas/Monterey, Mexico, with honors. He also holds the National Intelligence Medal and is a fellow in the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Diane E. griffin, IOM and NAS, is professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned a degree in biology from Augustana College in 1962, followed by M.D. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) degrees from Stanford University. She interned at Stanford University Hospital between 1968 and 1970 before beginning her career at Johns Hopkins as a postdoctoral fellow in virology and infectious disease in 1970. After completing her postdoctoral work, she was named an assistant professor of medicine and neurology. Since then, she has held the posi - tions of associate professor, professor, and now professor and chair. She served as an investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1973 to 1979. Dr. Griffin’s research interest includes alphaviruses and acute encephalitis. She is also working on the effect of measles virus infection on immune responses. Dr. Griffin is the principal investigator on a variety of grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. She is the author or coauthor of more than 300 scholarly papers and articles, and the past president of the American Society for Virology, the Association of Medical School Micro - biology Chairs, and the American Society for Microbiology. kenneth A. kress is a senior scientist for KBK Consulting, Inc., and a consultant for Booz Allen Hamilton, where he specializes in quantum information science and other technical evaluations and strategic planning for intelligence and defense applications. Some of his past clients include DARPA’s Microsystems Technol - ogy Office, Noblis, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Mitretek Systems, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Special Programs Division. From 1971 to 1999 he worked in a

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 APPENDIX A series of positions at the Central Intelligence Agency’s Directorate of Operations, Office of Development and Engineering and finally Office of Research and Devel- opment (ORD)—first as a research and development manager, later as a program manager, and finally as an ORD senior scientist responsible for management support, the development of technical and strategic plans, and DoD interagency coordination for advanced technology. He is the inventor of the solid-state neutron detector, for which he won an award in 1981. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Montana State University. gilman g. Louie is a partner of Alsop Louie Partners, a venture capital fund focusing on the development of great technology entrepreneurs. Prior to this posi - tion he was president and CEO of In-Q-Tel, the venture capital group helping to deliver new technologies to the CIA and the intelligence community. Before help - ing found In-Q-Tel, Louie served as Hasbro Interactive’s chief creative officer and as general manager of the Games.com group, where he was responsible for creat - ing and implementing the business plan for Hasbro’s Internet games site. Prior to joining Hasbro, he served as chief executive of the Nexa Corporation, Sphere, Inc., Spectrum HoloByte, Inc., and Microprose, Inc. As a pioneer in the interac - tive entertainment industry, Gilman’s successes have included the Falcon, F-16 flight simulator, and Tetris, which he brought over from the Soviet Union. Louie has served on the board of directors of Wizards of the Coast, Total Entertainment Network, Direct Language, and FASA Interactive. He was an active member of the Markle Foundation Task Force on National Security and the Information Age. julie j.C.H. Ryan is associate professor of engineering management and systems engineering at George Washington University. She holds a B.S. in humanities from the U.S. Air Force Academy, an M.L.S. in technology from Eastern Michi - gan University, and a D.Sc. in engineering management from the George Wash- ington University. Dr. Ryan began her career as an intelligence officer, serving the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, working in a series of increasingly responsible positions throughout her career. Her areas of interest are in information security and information warfare research. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board from 1995 to 1998. During a distinguished career she has conducted several research projects and has authored articles, book chapters, monographs, and a book in her focus area.