Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

C. D. (Dan) Mote, Jr. (Chair, NAE) is president of the University of Maryland and Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering. Under his leadership, academic and research programs at the university have flourished. In 2009, the university was ranked 18th among public research universities, up from 30th in 1998. Dr. Mote is a leader in the national dialogue on higher education, and his analyses of shifting funding models have been featured in local and national media. He has testified about major educational issues before Congress, representing the university and higher education associations on the problem of visa barriers for international students and scholars and on deemed export control issues. He has served and currently serves on several National Research Council committees that work to identify challenges to U.S. leadership in key areas of science and technology, including the committee that wrote the Rising Above the Gathering Storm report. Dr. Mote is currently co-chair on the NAS Government-University-Industry-Research Roundtable and a member of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). He is also a member of the Steering Committee of the Energy Security Innovation and Sustainability Initiative, an activity of the Council on Competitiveness. He served as vice chair of the Department of Defense Basic Research Committee and was a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences ARISE panel that produced Advancing Research in Science and Engineering: Investing in Early-Career Scientists and High-Risk, High-Reward Research. In 2004 he was appointed a founding member of the National Security Higher Education Advisory Board. Dr. Mote is a member of the Council and treasurer of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He serves on the board of directors of the Greater Washington Board of Trade and the Federal City Council.

Prior to assuming the presidency at the University of Maryland, Dr. Mote was a member of the University of California (UC), Berkeley faculty for 31 years. From 1991 to 1998, he was vice chancellor at UC Berkeley, held an endowed chair in mechanical systems, and was president of the UC Berkeley Foundation. He led a comprehensive capital campaign for UC Berkeley that raised $1.4 billion. He earlier served as chair of UC Berkeley’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and led the department to its number one ranking in the National Research Council review of graduate program effectiveness.

Dr. Mote is internationally recognized for his research on the dynamics of gyroscopic systems and the biomechanics of snow skiing, and he has produced more than 300 publications. He holds patents in the United States, Norway, Finland, and Sweden, and he has mentored 58 Ph.D. students. Dr. Mote has received numerous awards and honors, including the Humboldt Prize awarded by the Federal Republic of Germany. He is a recipient of the Berkeley citation, an award from UC Berkeley similar to the honorary doctorate, and he was named Distinguished



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members C. D. (Dan) Mote, jr. (Chair, NAE) is president of the University of Maryland and Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering. Under his leadership, academic and research programs at the university have flourished. In 2009, the university was ranked 18th among public research universities, up from 30th in 1998. Dr. Mote is a leader in the national dialogue on higher education, and his analyses of shifting funding models have been fea - tured in local and national media. He has testified about major educational issues before Congress, representing the university and higher education associations on the problem of visa barriers for international students and scholars and on deemed export control issues. He has served and currently serves on several National Research Council committees that work to identify challenges to U.S. leadership in key areas of science and technology, including the committee that wrote the rising Above the gathering Storm report. Dr. Mote is currently co-chair on the NAS Government-University-Industry-Research Roundtable and a member of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). He is also a member of the Steering Committee of the Energy Security Innovation and Sustainability Initiative, an activity of the Council on Competitiveness. He served as vice chair of the Department of Defense Basic Research Committee and was a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences ARISE panel that produced Advancing research in Science and Engineering: investing in Early-Career Scientists and High-risk, High-reward research. In 2004 he was appointed a founding member of the National Security Higher Education Advisory Board. Dr. Mote is a member of the Council and treasurer of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He serves on the board of directors of the Greater Washington Board of Trade and the Federal City Council. Prior to assuming the presidency at the University of Maryland, Dr. Mote was a member of the University of California (UC), Berkeley faculty for 31 years. From 1991 to 1998, he was vice chancellor at UC Berkeley, held an endowed chair in mechanical systems, and was president of the UC Berkeley Foundation. He led a comprehensive capital campaign for UC Berkeley that raised $1.4 billion. He earlier served as chair of UC Berkeley’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and led the department to its number one ranking in the National Research Council review of graduate program effectiveness. Dr. Mote is internationally recognized for his research on the dynamics of gyroscopic systems and the biome - chanics of snow skiing, and he has produced more than 300 publications. He holds patents in the United States, Norway, Finland, and Sweden, and he has mentored 58 Ph.D. students. Dr. Mote has received numerous awards and honors, including the Humboldt Prize awarded by the Federal Republic of Germany. He is a recipient of the Berkeley citation, an award from UC Berkeley similar to the honorary doctorate, and he was named Distinguished 0

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0 S&T STrATEgiES Of Six COuNTriES Engineering Alumnus. He has received three honorary doctorates. Dr. Mote is a fellow of the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Acoustical Society of America, and the International Academy of Wood Science, and he holds honorary membership in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He received the 2005 J.P. Den Hartog award from the ASME Inter- national Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound to honor his lifelong contribution to the teaching and/or practice of vibration engineering. In 2005 he received the Founders Award from the NAE in recognition of his comprehensive body of work on the dynamics of moving flexible structures and his leadership in academia. He earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from UC Berkeley. john Gannon (Vice Chair) is vice president for Global Analysis, a line of business within BAE Systems Infor- mation Technology. Prior to joining BAE Systems, Dr. Gannon served as staff director of the House Homeland Security Committee, the first new committee established by Congress in more than 30 years. In 2002-2003, he was a team leader in the White House’s Transitional Planning Office for the Department of Homeland Security. He served previously in the senior-most analytic positions in the intelligence community, including as the Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA’s) director of European analysis, deputy director for intelligence, chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and assistant director of central intelligence for analysis and production. In the pri - vate sector, he developed the analytic workforce for Intellibridge Corporation, a web-based provider of outsourced analysis for government and corporate clients. Dr. Gannon served as a naval officer in Southeast Asia and later in several Naval Reserve commands, retiring as a captain. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, and master’s and doctorate degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He is an adjunct professor in the National Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. Rakesh Agrawal (NAE) is a Microsoft technical fellow and heads the Search Labs in Microsoft Research, where he is leading development of a next-generation search engine. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineer- ing, a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and a fellow of IEEE. He is the recipient of the first ACM-SIGKDD Innovation Award, ACM-SIGKDD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award, ACM-SIGMOD Test of Time Award, VLDB Most Influential Paper Award, IEEE-ICDE Most Influential Paper Award, and Computerworld First Horizon Award. In 2003, he was named one of Scientific American’s 50 top scientists and technologists. Prior to joining Microsoft in March 2006, Dr. Agrawal was an IBM fellow and led the Quest group at the IBM Almaden Research Center. Earlier, he was at Bell Laboratories from 1983 to 1989. He also worked for three years at Bharat Heavy Electricals, Ltd. in India. Dr. Agrawal is well known for developing fundamental data-mining concepts and technologies and pioneering key concepts in data privacy, including Hippocratic database, sovereign information sharing, and privacy-preserving data mining. IBM’s commercial data-mining project, Intelligent Miner, grew out of his work. His research has been incorporated into other IBM products, including DB2 Mining Extender, DB2 OLAP Server, and WebSphere Commerce Server and has influenced several other commercial and academic products, prototypes, and applications. His other technical contributions include the Polyglot object-oriented type system, Alert active database system, Ode (Object database and environment), Alpha (extension of relational databases with generalized transitive closure), nest distributed system, transaction management, and database machines. Dr. Agrawal has been granted more than 60 patents. He has published more than 150 research papers, many of them considered seminal. He has written the first- as well as second-highest cited of all papers in the fields of databases and data mining (13th and 15th most cited across all computer science as of February 2007 in CiteSeer). His papers have been cited more than 6,500 times, with more than 15 of them receiving more than 100 citations each, making him the most-cited author in the field of database systems. His work has been featured in the New york Times year in review, the New york Times science section, and several other publications. He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1983. He also holds a B.E. in electronics and communication engineering from IIT-Roorkee and a two-year postgraduate diploma in industrial engineering from the National Institute of Industrial Engineering (NITIE), Bombay. Robert Brodersen (NAE) is an emeritus professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Depart - ment of the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently chairman of two companies that he co-founded with

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0 APPENdix A former students: SiBEAM, which provides multi-gigabit wireless transmission service using 60 GHz CMOS, and BEEcube, which produces field-programmable gate array computing and emulation platforms. Dr. Brodersen is also a co-founder of Atheros Communications, a supplier of WiFi chips and systems, and Adaptrum, a company dedicated to exploiting radio “white space” opportunities. He has won best paper awards for a number of journal and conference papers in the areas of integrated circuit design, computer aided design (CAD), and communications, including the IEEE Baker Award for Best Paper in the IEEE transactions and the IEEE Morris Liebmann Best Paper Award. In 1982 he became a fellow of the IEEE, and in 1988 he was elected to be member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Brodersen has been recognized extensively for his work and is the recipient of the IEEE Technical Achievement Awards in both the Circuits and Systems Society and the Signal Processing Society, the IEEE Solid State Circuits Award, an IEEE Millennium Award from the Circuits and Systems Society, and the Golden Jubilee Award. In 2001 he was awarded the Lewis Winner Award for outstanding paper of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, and in 2005 he received the Jack Raper Outstanding Paper Award for the same conference. In 2006 he was a co-recipient of the Jack Neubauer Award for best paper of the year in the Vehicular Technology Society transactions. In 1999 Dr. Brodersen received an honorary doctorate from the University of Lund in Sweden. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. Daniel T. Chiu is a professor of chemistry at the University of Washington, Seattle. His research focuses on the information processing and encoding methods of complex biological systems using tools that combine ultrasensi - tive laser-based detection and manipulation methodologies with micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. Dr. Chiu is currently a member of the University of Washington’s Center for Nanotechnology and Neurobiology and Behavior Program. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the McKnight Technological Innovations in Neuroscience Award, the National Institutes of Health Cutting-Edge Technology in Basic Research Award, the National Science Foundation Career Award, and the Research Corporation’s Research Innovation Award. He was named a Keck Distinguished Young Scholar in Biomedical Research in 2003 and an Alfred P. Sloan fellow in 2005. Dr. Chiu is the author of more than 100 publications and has issued 25 patents in the United States and abroad. He obtained a B.A. in neurobiology and a B.S. in chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley in 1993, and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University in 1998. He completed postdoctoral research at Harvard University. jaqueline Fletcher is a Regents’ professor of plant pathology and director of the National Institute for Microbial Forensics & Food and Agricultural Biosecurity at Oklahoma State University. Her research interests center on prokaryotic plant pathogens, including wall-less bacteria (spiroplasmas and phytoplasmas) and bacteria with walls. Both of these groups provide exciting avenues for evaluation of disease processes, transmission factors, host resis - tance, and the genetic mechanisms that control these processes. She is currently involved in biosecurity work with the National Bioforensics Center at the Department of Homeland Security, the Biological Sciences Experts’ Group at the National Intelligence Council, the One Health National Initiative, and the Inter-Agency Working Group on Citrus Variegated Chlorosis. She is also chair of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) Food Safety Interest Group, the Microbial Forensics Interest Community, and the APS Councilors’ Forum. She has been an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow (2007) and an American Phytopathological Society fellow (2005), and she is the recipient of the Sigma Xi Lectureship Award. Dr. Fletcher has a Ph.D. in plant pathology from Texas A&M University and an M.S. in botany from the University of Montana. Paul C. Gailey is a physicist currently serving as senior science advisor to the Fetzer Institute and director of research for the Fetzer-Franklin Fund, a nonprofit international science research program aimed at identifying, funding, and providing intellectual support for advanced projects in cognition and consciousness. He has worked in the areas of electromagnetic theory, nonlinear dynamics, and random processes particularly as they relate to living systems. During his career, Dr. Gailey served as a research scientist for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a research director at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and associate professor of physics and astronomy at Ohio University. During the past 10 years, he has served variously as consultant, vice president, and senior advi -

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0 S&T STrATEgiES Of Six COuNTriES sor to the Fetzer Institute, working to promote a deeper cultural dialogue on science and spirituality—particularly regarding how our conception of science interacts with human values and our sense of meaning. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Utah and his M.S. and B.S. degrees in physics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Hendrik F. Hamann is currently a research manager for photonics and thermal physics in the Physical Sciences Department at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center. In 1995 he joined JILA (a joint institute between the University of Colorado and the National Institute of Standards and Technology) as a research associate in Boulder, Colorado. During his tenure at JILA he developed novel near-field optical microscopes to study single molecules at high spatial resolution. Since 2001 he has been leading the thermal physics program in IBM Research, first as a research staff member and currently as a research manager. His current research interest includes nanoscale heat transfer as well as thermal and energy management of computing systems. His responsibilities include strategy work for science and technology in IBM. He has authored and co-authored more than 30 peer-reviewed scientific papers and holds more than 30 patents and more than 25 pending patent applications. Dr. Hamann is an IBM master inventor, has won several major IBM awards, and has been a Finalist of the New York Academy of Science Innovation in Industry Awards. He has served on several governmental committees and is an industrial advisor to several universi - ties. He is a member of the American Physical Society (APS), Optical Society of America (OSA), and IEEE. Daniel E. Hastings is dean for undergraduate education and a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engi - neering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). As professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems, Dean Hastings has taught courses and seminars in plasma physics, rocket propulsion, advanced space power and propulsion systems, aerospace policy, technology and policy, and space systems engi - neering. Dean Hastings served as chief scientist to the U.S. Air Force from 1997 to 1999. In that role, he acted as chief scientific adviser to the chief of staff and the secretary and provided assessments on a wide range of scientific and technical issues affecting the Air Force mission. He led several influential studies advising the Air Force investment in space, global energy projection, and options for a science and technology workforce for the 21st century. His recent research has concentrated on issues of space systems and space policy and also on issues related to spacecraft environmental interactions, space propulsion, and space systems engineering. He has published many papers and a book in the field of spacecraft-environment interactions and several papers in space propulsion and space systems. He has also led several national studies on government investment in space technology. Dean Hastings is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, a fellow of the International Council on Systems Engineering, and a member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He served as a member of the National Science Board and the Applied Physics Lab Science and Technology Advisory Panel, as well as the chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Advisory Committee, a member of the Corporation of Draper Laboratory, and a member of the Intelligence Science Board. He has served on several national committees on issues in the national security space. As dean for undergraduate education, Dean Hastings has broad responsibility for policy and direction in undergraduate education at MIT. He also oversees several administrative offices at MIT including the Office of Undergraduate Advising and Academic Programming, Admissions Office, Global Education and Career Development Center, Office of Experiential Learn- ing, Office of Educational Innovation and Technology, Office of Faculty Support, Office of Minority Education, Registrar’s Office, Student Financial Services, the Teaching and Learning Laboratory, and the ROTC Programs. Dean Hastings earned a B.A. in mathematics from Oxford University in England in 1976 and a Ph.D. and an S.M. from MIT in aeronautics and astronautics in 1980 and 1978, respectively. Thomas R. Howell is an attorney at Dewey & LeBoeuf with more than 25 years of experience practicing in international trade matters. His practice includes litigation pursuant to the U.S. trade remedies (e.g., antidump - ing, countervailing duty laws, and Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974), resolution of World Trade Organization disputes, support for international negotiations, and securing market access abroad. A particular area of his experi - ence has been developing and analyzing comprehensive information about industrial policies, private commercial practices, and economic systems outside the United States. Mr. Howell has performed numerous analytic studies

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0 APPENdix A for clients on subjects such as foreign high-technology research and development programs and other industrial promotion efforts; national and international cartels, government subsidies, market conditions, and anticompeti - tive practices in specific sectors in many countries in Europe and Asia; and the formation of trade policy and the functioning of trade regimes. In 2004, he served on the Defense Science Board Task Force on Secure Microchip Supply. In 1985-1986, Mr. Howell represented the U.S. Semiconductor Industry Association in the Section 301 action against Japan, culminating in the opening of the Japanese market to U.S.-made semiconductors. He has since participated in several other market access efforts with respect to Japan in areas such as soda ash, insurance, and telecommunications equipment. Mr. Howell is the author of more than 25 publications on industrial and trade policies of foreign nations. He holds an A.B. from Harvard University and a J.D. from Boston University. Donald H. Levy (NAS), Albert A. Michelson distinguished service professor in chemistry, is the University of Chicago’s vice president for research and for national laboratories; CEO of UChicago Argonne, LLC; vice- chairman of the Board of Governors for Argonne; and a member of the Board of Directors for Fermilab. Named to the university position in 2007, Dr. Levy’s responsibilities include oversight of the management contracts for both Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Office of Technology and Intellectual Policy, the Office of University Research Administration, University-Argonne Research Centers, and all issues related to human subjects research. In addition to his responsibilities for research across the university and Argonne campuses, Levy chairs the Science Policy Council, a collaboration with Argonne, Northwestern University, and the University of Illinois, established in 2005 to enhance Argonne’s scientific capabilities, to strengthen the state’s technological base and workforce preparation, and to improve Illinois’ ability to compete for federal research funding. Dr. Levy joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1967. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a former chairman of the Chemistry Department and he played an important leadership role in planning the new Gordon Center for Integrative Science. A physical chemist, Dr. Levy was a leader in developing and using supersonic jet cooling to study the structure of molecules. Dr. Levy was editor of the Journal of Chemical Physics from 1998-2008. His awards include the E. Bright Wilson Award in Spectroscopy and the Ellis Lippincott Award from the Optical Society of America. He holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Frances S. Ligler (NAE) is the Navy’s senior scientist for biosensors and biomaterials and current chair of the bioengineering section of the National Academy of Engineering. A researcher in the fields of biosensors and microfluidics, she has also worked in biochemistry, immunology, and proteomics. Dr. Ligler has more than 300 full-length publications and patents, which have been cited more than 6,100 times. She is an elected fellow of the Society for Photooptical Instrumentation Engineering and serves as an associate editor of Analytical Chemistry and a regional editor for the Americas for biosensors & bioelectronics. Her awards include the Navy Superior Civilian Service Medal, the National Drug Control Policy Technology Transfer Award, the Chemical Society Hillebrand Award, Navy Merit Award, NRL Technology Transfer Award, three NRL Edison Awards for Patent of the Year, and the national Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Outstanding Achievement in Science Award. Additionally, in 2003 she was awarded the Homeland Security Award (Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Field) by the Christopher Columbus Foundation and the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Senior Professional by President Bush. She has previously served on the National Research Council panel on Test and Evaluation of Biological Standoff Detection Systems (2007-2008). She earned a B.S. from Furman University and both a D.Phil. and a D.Sc. from Oxford University. Heather j. MacLean is a nuclear engineer at the Idaho National Laboratory in the Nuclear Fuels & Materials Division. She is a principal investigator for irradiation tests of advanced nuclear fuels in support of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program. Dr. MacLean is responsible for determining fuel compositions, irradiation test parameters, insertion of fuel and material tests into the Advanced Test Reactor, and post-irradiation examina - tion procedures. Dr. MacLean was a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories from 2004 to 2006. She was a member of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Integration Team, responsible for technical

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0 S&T STrATEgiES Of Six COuNTriES integration activities related to fuels development for advanced thermal- and fast-spectrum systems, and the deputy project manager for the RTG Launch Safety Analysis project for space nuclear power sources. Dr. MacLean’s thesis research focused on silver transport in silicon carbide in TRISO-coated fuel particles for high-temperature gas reactors. While a graduate student, Dr. MacLean was a Department of Energy nuclear energy fellowship recipient and conducted research at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Schenectady, New York. She designed and developed novel graphite/silicon carbide spherical diffusion couples to study thermally accelerated silver migration in silicon carbide. Her experience also include three summers at the Palisades Nuclear Plant in Covert, Michigan, where she analyzed the balance of plant data, provided engineering support during a refueling outage, and analyzed dry fuel storage system performance. Dr. MacLean has been a member of the American Nuclear Society since 1994. She is currently treasurer of the Materials Science & Technology Division and an executive committee member of the Aerospace Nuclear Science & Technology Division. Dr. MacLean earned a B.S. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1996 and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2004. Fawwaz T. Ulaby (NAE) is the Arthur Thurnau Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He was previously the founding provost and executive vice president for academic affairs of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), a graduate research university under develop - ment along the Red Sea in Saudi Arabia. Prior to assuming this position, Dr. Ulaby was the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, where he had also served as vice president for research (1999-2005). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of IEEE and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he serves on several scientific boards and commissions. Since joining the University of Michigan faculty in 1984, Dr. Ulaby has directed numer - ous interdisciplinary, NASA-funded projects aimed at the development of high-resolution satellite radar sensors for mapping Earth’s terrestrial environment. He also served as the founding director of a NASA-funded Center for Space Terahertz Technology, whose research was aimed at the development of microelectronic devices and circuits that operate at wavelengths intermediate between the infrared and the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Over his academic career, he has supervised 115 highly motivated and talented graduate students. Dr. Ulaby received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1968. Kathleen A. Walsh is an assistant professor of national security affairs in the National Security Decision Making Department at the Naval War College (NWC), where she teaches policymaking and process (PMP) and the contemporary staff environment (CSE). Her research focuses on China and the Asia-Pacific region, particularly security and technology issues. Her current research projects include assessing national security implications of China’s commercial shipbuilding enterprise and, as a separate project, implications from China’s increasing role in UN peacekeeping operations. She is author of numerous publications, including “The Role, Promise and Challenges of Dual-Use Technologies in National Defense,” chapter 7 in The modern defense industry: Political, Economic and Technological issues (Richard A. Bitzinger, ed., Praeger, 2009); “National Security Challenges and Competition: Defense and Space R&D in the Chinese Strategic Context,” Technology in Society (July 2008); Post-Conflict borders and uN Peace Operations: Part : border Security, Trade Controls, and uN Peace Opera- tions (Henry L. Stimson Center, 2007); and foreign High-Tech r&d in China: risks, rewards, and implications for uS-China relations (Stimson Center, 2003), as well as numerous congressional testimonies, public presenta - tions, and high-level government briefings. Prior to joining the NWC, Dr. Walsh was a senior consultant to several Washington-area think tanks (e.g., CSIS, Monterey Institute, and Stimson Center) and a senior associate at the Stimson Center as well as at a defense consulting firm. She was appointed in 2007 as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Assessing the Need for a National Defense Stockpile and as a member of the Office of Director of National Intelligence’s Summer Hard Problem (SHARP) Program. She is an affiliate of the China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI), participates in the Asia Pacific Study Group, and is a member of the U.S. Council on Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP) and its Study Group on the Implications for Naval Enhancement in the Asia Pacific (2009-2010).

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0 APPENdix A Heather Wilson represented New Mexico in the U.S. Congress from 1998-2009. The Hon. Wilson served on the Energy and Commerce Committee for the duration of her tenure in Congress, where she was involved in all matters relating to the oversight of the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Environmental Protection Agency, including matters related to the Clean Water Act and Superfund laws, as well as oversight of operations and security at our National Laboratories. During her 10 years in the House, the Hon. Wilson was a prominent leader on a broad range of national security issues. For six years she chaired the House Republican Policy Committee on National Security and Homeland Security and produced two major policy studies on non-proliferation and nuclear deterrence policy. Before entering public service, the Hon. Wilson was president of Keystone International, Inc., a company that performed business development and program planning work in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Prior to that, the Hon. Wilson was the director for defense policy and arms control on the National Security Council Staff at the White House. There, she oversaw development of U.S. policy and negotiating strategy that led to the completion of the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty and chaired the inter-agency group that developed guidance for the American delegation in Vienna, Austria. From 1987 to 1989, the Hon. Wilson was an Air Force Officer assigned to the U.S. mission to NATO in Brussels, Belgium. During the spring of 1989, the Hon. Wilson was the acting representative of the Secretary of Defense in the U.S. Delegation to the Conventional Forces in Europe negotiations in Vienna, Austria. She was also the U.S. mission’s expert on British, Spanish, and Portuguese defense plans. From 1985 to 1987, the Hon. Wilson served at the headquarters of the U.S. Air Force in the United Kingdom, where she served as the principal contact for the British Government on matters related to planning and negotiating the beddown of nuclear capable cruise missiles at RAF Molesworth and RAF Greenham Common. The Hon. Wilson is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1982, and, as a Rhodes Scholar, she earned her master’s and doctoral degrees from Oxford University in England. Her doctoral thesis, published as a book, earned a major prize from the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, Switzerland, for a major contribution to the study of international humanitarian law. She was the first American ever to have received this award.