B

BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS
*

REBECCA BAGLEY

Rebecca Bagley is deputy secretary for the Technology Investment Office of the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED). Rebecca oversees operations of the Technology Investment Office which serves as a catalyst for growth and competitiveness for Pennsylvania companies and universities through technology-based economic development (TBED) initiatives including funding, partnerships, and support services. Major programs administered by the office include: Keystone Innovation Zones; the Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority (BFTDA) including the Ben Franklin Technology Partners; the Tobacco Settlement Investment Board; Life Science Greenhouses; Venture Capital Investment Program; Industrial Resource Centers; and additional targeted technology investments. Rebecca managed for DCED, the $650 million Energy Independence Strategy that was signed into law in July 2008. As deputy secretary, Rebecca manages approximately $79 million in appropriations and more than $1.7 billion in investments.

RICHARD BENDIS

Mr. Bendis has distinguished himself as a successful entrepreneur, corporate executive, venture capitalist, investment banker, innovation and technology-based economic development leader, international speaker and consultant in the technology and healthcare industries.

He currently serves as the founding president and CEO of Innovation America (IA), a national 501(c)3 not for profit, private/public partnership focused on accelerating the growth of the entrepreneurial innovation economy in America.

Mr. Bendis has been engaged and appointed to selected national innovation related organizations and committees that include the White House U.S. Innovation Partnership (USIP) Advisory Task Force and Co-Chair of the Small Business Innovation Research Committee), the National Governor’s Association (NGA) Science and Technology Council of the State’s Executive Committee, the State Federal Technology Task Force, the National Academies (NAS) committee on

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*As of June 2009. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium.



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B BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS∗ REBECCA BAGLEY Rebecca Bagley is deputy secretary for the Technology Investment Office of the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED). Rebecca oversees operations of the Technology Investment Office which serves as a catalyst for growth and competitiveness for Pennsylvania companies and universities through technology-based economic development (TBED) initiatives including funding, partnerships, and support services. Major programs administered by the office include: Keystone Innovation Zones; the Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority (BFTDA) including the Ben Franklin Technology Partners; the Tobacco Settlement Investment Board; Life Science Greenhouses; Venture Capital Investment Program; Industrial Resource Centers; and additional targeted technology investments. Rebecca managed for DCED, the $650 million Energy Independence Strategy that was signed into law in July 2008. As deputy secretary, Rebecca manages approximately $79 million in appropriations and more than $1.7 billion in investments. RICHARD BENDIS Mr. Bendis has distinguished himself as a successful entrepreneur, corporate executive, venture capitalist, investment banker, innovation and technology-based economic development leader, international speaker and consultant in the technology and healthcare industries. He currently serves as the founding president and CEO of Innovation America (IA), a national 501(c)3 not for profit, private/public partnership focused on accelerating the growth of the entrepreneurial innovation economy in America. Mr. Bendis has been engaged and appointed to selected national innovation related organizations and committees that include the White House U.S. Innovation Partnership (USIP) Advisory Task Force and Co- Chair of the Small Business Innovation Research Committee), the National Governor’s Association (NGA) Science and Technology Council of the State’s Executive Committee, the State Federal Technology Task Force, the National Academies (NAS) committee on ∗ As of June 2009. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium. 129

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130 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY “Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practices in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives”; National Academies National Research Council Review of “an Assessment of the SBIR Program; National Institute of Standards and Technology Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) National Advisory Board; U.S. Small Business Administration’s Angel Capital Electronic Network (ACENET) Board of Directors; American Academy for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Nominating Committee and the American Association Research Competitiveness Program Advisory Committee; Council on Competitiveness—Clusters of Innovation Committee. Mr. Bendis has also served as a board member and representative to the following organizations: National Association of State Venture Funds (NASVF) Founding Board member and Executive Committee member; American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Strategic Innovations and Initiatives Committee; State Science and Technology Institute (SSTI) Founding Board member and Executive Committee member; Eisenhower Fellowships Nominating Committee and the Ernst and Young Entrepreneurial Institute as national/regional Judge. Mr. Bendis has or continues to provide global consulting services to several international organizations including the International Science Parks and Innovation Expert Group, the United Nations, NATO, UK Trade and Industry, European Commission, French Embassy, the German Marshall Fund, and others global ventures. Mr. Bendis founded the Bendis Investment Group LLC, (BIG), a financial intermediary and consulting firm which has a joint venture with the Fortress Investment Group (NYSE, FIG) and is responsible for the origination of debt and equity investments located in BIG’s Network. Mr. Bendis, also recently provided interim CEO consulting services to the National Association of Seed and Venture Funds (NASVF) and strategic growth and repositioning services to the Pennsylvania Biotechnology Center. Previously, Mr. Bendis served as president, and CEO of True Product ID, Inc.; a global publicly traded anti-counterfeiting technology company (NASDAQ, TPID), which he relocated to Beijing, China. Mr. Bendis also founded and served as the founding president and CEO of Innovation Philadelphia (IP), a three-state regional public/private partnership dedicated to growing the wealth and workforce of the Greater Philadelphia Region. IP managed a portfolio of programs in four distinct areas: Direct Equity Investment/Financing Assistance; Technology Commercialization; Global/Regional Economic and Workforce Development; and Market Research and Branding. Mr. Bendis is on the IP Board of Directors. Previously, Mr. Bendis successfully leveraged a career in the private sector (with Quaker Oats, Polaroid, Texas Instruments, Marion Laboratories, and Kimberly Services) and the venture capital industry (RAB Ventures) to lead the Kansas Technology Enterprise Corporation

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131 APPENDIX B (KTEC). As its president and CEO, he developed KTEC into a globally recognized model for technology-based economic development. Mr. Bendis also successfully built an Inc. 500 healthcare software company, Continental Healthcare Systems, Inc., which he took public on NASDAQ and later sold to an international conglomerate. In addition, Mr. Bendis manages his own angel investment fund. Mr. Bendis is a frequent consultant and speaker to the United Nations, NATO, the European Commission, METI, AKEA, National and International technology-based economic development organizations, as well as over 20 states, several U.S. cities and regions and 16 countries. Mr. Bendis serves on several regional and national not-for-profit boards and committees including the National Association of Seed and Venture Funds (NASVF) and the State Science and Technology Institute (SSTI), both of which he was a founding Board member. He was a nominee for the 2005 Ernst and Young National Entrepreneur Supporter of the Year Award (EOY) and was the 1996 recipient of the Regional Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award; he currently serves as an EOY Judge. He also serves on the board of FlagshipPDG (NASDAQ, PDGE). GEORGE BO-LINN George W. Bo-Linn, MD, is the chief program officer for the Foundation’s San Francisco Bay Area Program, which includes the Betty Irene Moore Nursing Initiative, the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis Commitment, and areas of focus including Science and Technology Museums and Land Protection. George comes to the Foundation with over 25 years of extensive executive leadership and expertise in the field of healthcare including medical research, private practice, health insurance plans, nursing and physician organizations, and health/hospital systems. Most recently George was the senior vice president and chief medical officer at Catholic Healthcare West, the largest non-profit hospital system in the western United States. His responsibilities included all aspects of clinical quality, patient safety and satisfaction, risk management, resource utilization management, clinical information systems (including privacy and security), and healthcare professionals (physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and others). He is the author of numerous scientific publications, lectures extensively nationally and internationally and serves on several boards of national healthcare organizations. George holds a B.A. from Rice University, and an M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine. His residency in internal medicine was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, gastroenterology, and he had a subspecialty fellowship at the University of Texas, post-fellowship training at the Johann- Wolfgang-Goethe University in Germany, and received his Masters of Healthcare Administration at the Carlson School of Business, University of Minnesota.

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132 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY SUSAN CRAWFORD Susan Crawford is a special assistant to the president for Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy and a member of the National Economic Council. She is on leave from the University of Michigan Law School where she teaches cyberlaw and telecommunications law. Ms. Crawford was a member of the ICANN Board from 2005-2008, and is the founder of OneWebDay. She was formerly a partner at Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering (now WilmerHale). MICHAEL CROW Michael Crow became the sixteenth president of Arizona State University in 2002. He is guiding the transformation of ASU into one of the nation’s leading public metropolitan research universities, an institution combining academic excellence, inclusiveness to a broad demographic, and maximum societal impact. During his tenure ASU has established major interdisciplinary research initiatives such as the Biodesign Institute, the Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS), and more than a dozen new interdisciplinary schools, and witnessed an unprecedented research infrastructure expansion and doubling of research expenditures. He was previously executive vice provost of Columbia University, where he oversaw Columbia’s research enterprise and technology transfer operations. A fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he is the author of books and articles analyzing research organizations and science and technology policy. Crow received his Ph.D. in Public Administration (Science and Technology Policy) from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, in 1985. MARYANN FELDMAN Maryann Feldman is the S.K. Heninger Distinguished Chair in Public Policy at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research and teaching interests focus on the areas of innovation, the commercialization of academic research, and the factors that promote technological change and economic growth. A large part of Dr. Feldman's work concerns the geography of innovation—investigating the reasons why innovation clusters spatially and the mechanisms that support and sustain industrial clusters. Previously, Dr. Feldman held the Miller Distinguished Chair in Higher Education at the University of Georgia (2006-2008) and the Jeffery S. Skoll Chair in Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Professor of Business Economics at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (2002-2006). She started her career at Johns Hopkins University.

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133 APPENDIX B Dr. Feldman has served on the Advisory Panel for the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Program on Societal Dimensions of Engineering, Science, and Technology. CHRISTINA GABRIEL Dr. Christina Gabriel joined The Heinz Endowments in 2006 with extensive experience in research, research management, university- industry collaboration, and technology transfer. She is responsible for the foundation’s efforts to capitalize on the research strengths of the region’s universities, medical centers, corporate and government laboratories to promote economic growth and opportunity in southwestern Pennsylvania. After receiving her doctorate in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Gabriel began her professional career in 1985 as principal investigator conducting experimental research at AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey. Her work focused on lasers, optical fibers and thin-film waveguide devices for telecommunications, switching and computing applications. She holds three patents. Dr. Gabriel joined the National Science Foundation in 1991 to direct industry-university collaborative centers programs and by 1997 was deputy head of the $350 million engineering directorate. During the 1994 legislative cycle she served a detail on Capitol Hill as one of three majority professional staff members for the $90 billion VA, HUD and Independent Agencies Subcommittee of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. From 1998 to 2006, she worked at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, eventually becoming vice provost and chief technology officer. While in that position she also represented the region’s three major research universities on the leadership team of the corporate consortium that competed successfully in 2004 to manage the five-year R&D Services Support Contract for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. Dr. Gabriel received both her master’s and doctoral degrees from MIT and her undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. In 1990 she was a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo in Japan. She has served as a reviewer and steering committee member for the National Science Foundation and the National Academies, and is a member of the MIT Corporation Visiting Committee on Sponsored Research and the Penn State Research Foundation Board. Dr. Gabriel has served on several nonprofit boards in Pittsburgh and as an external technology adviser for the Pittsburgh Public Schools’ strategic planning process. She was a National Merit Scholar and an AT&T Bell Laboratories GRPW Fellow. Dr. Gabriel is married and has three children.

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134 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY PRADEEP HALDAR Dr. Pradeep Haldar serves as Founding Professor and Head of the NanoEngineering Constellation at the College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering (CNSE) at the University at Albany, (SUNY). He is also Director of the Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center at the College. At CNSE he has been actively involved in applying and integrating nanotechnology related innovations to solve engineering challenges related to energy efficiency, photovoltaic devices, and ultracapacitors. He has partnered with several universities, start-ups, and large companies in interdisciplinary technology research, development, and outreach initiatives. He serves as founder, Board Member, and Executive Director of New Energy New York Consortium and Chair, DoE NREL’s Clean Energy Alliance. He has led and organized several initiatives including Tech Valley Energy Forum, NY Loves Energy, and the Solar Initiative of New York. Prior to joining the University at Albany, Dr. Haldar founded and served as director of technology and general manager of rapidly growing SuperPower, a new subsidiary of Intermagnetics (now Philips). Prior to leading SuperPower, Dr. Haldar was manager of the Technology Development Organization at Intermagnetics in charge of the company’s efforts to pursue new opportunities and technology strategies in electric power, medical, and electronic industries. He has over 20 years of diverse technical, research, development, and management experience. He is senior member of IEEE and other professional organizations including NYAS, MRS, TMS, and AIP. Dr. Haldar is the author or co- author of over 250 reviewed technical papers, conference proceedings, and has three patents issued and four pending. Dr. Haldar is a fellow of the Institute of Physics and recipient of the President’s Excellence in Research award and the Business Review’s 40 under forty upcoming individuals in New York’s Capital Region. He has played a key role in developing New York State’s Hydrogen Roadmap, Superconductivity outreach programs, and the New York State Solar Roadmap. Dr. Haldar has his Ph.D. from Northeastern University and an MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. BOMANI HOWZE Bomani Howze joined the Heinz Endowments in 2007 as the program officer for the Innovation Economy Program. He is responsible for a grant-making portfolio that promotes entrepreneurship and economic opportunity within innovation clusters deriving from the region’s academic and industrial research asset base. A particular focus for this work is on collaborative and industry-led efforts to create green jobs that can offer family-sustaining career paths. Grant-making also includes micro-financing and social entrepreneurship, balanced and restorative justice, access to employment for ex-offenders, and targeting of federal

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135 APPENDIX B and state programs, including Recovery Act funds, in collaboration with grassroots community organizing initiatives. In earlier positions Mr. Howze has served as a nonprofit executive, a small business entrepreneur, and an elected community leader. He began his professional career as a public school teacher selected to help implement an innovative, year-round curriculum in an economically depressed neighborhood in Norfolk, VA. During his tenure the school realized dramatic improvements in student achievement, and Mr. Howze later introduced some of the same reforms within an African-centered public school curriculum in Pittsburgh. Mr. Howze earned his bachelors degree at Norfolk State University in Virginia and his MBA at Point Park University in Pittsburgh. He has served as vice president of the Pittsburgh chapter of the National Black MBA Association, president of the Three Rivers Investment Club, and elected keynote speaker for Leadership Pittsburgh XXV. As an interdisciplinary international studies fellow he worked with education programs in Venezuela, Brazil, South Africa, Kenya, India, Vietnam, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Japan. He is married and has two children. Mr. Howze was recently appointed by Governor Rendell to serve on the Pennsylvania Minority Business Development Authority. WILLIAM P. KITTREDGE William P. Kittredge is the Director of National Programs and Performance Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Commerce. He has served in this position since its creation in 2006. Dr. Kittredge’s responsibilities include administration of the Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms program, the Research program, and National Technical Assistance program. He is responsible for the development and implementation of performance measures and metrics for all EDA programs. The office also provides quantitative and qualitative analytical services, and GIS (Geographic Information Systems) support for EDA. Dr. Kittredge is an internationally recognized program evaluation and performance measurement authority. Dr. Kittredge has been engaged in strategic planning, program evaluation, and performance management since the inception of the Oregon Benchmarks and has served as project director during the 1996 update. He served as the senior analyst and project manager for the Pew Trust-funded Government Performance Project from 1997-2000. His former students and interns mentored in his office now occupy senior positions at OMB, GAO, World Bank, USTR, Grant Thornton, CitiFinancial, and many local governments. Dr. Kittredge’s research has been published in academic journals, including Public Administration Review and Municipal Finance Journal, and in the popular press, including USA Today. He is the author of two books addressing local government budgeting and financial condition analysis. His commentary has been broadcast by National Public Radio and Bloomberg News. He receives frequent invitations to lecture and to

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136 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY speak at conferences, and participates as a peer reviewer in his areas of expertise. Prior to seeking an advanced degree, he served in local elected office. His decade long local and regional government service included an appointment to the Washington Public Power Supply System Participants’ Review Board and a tour as Special Regional Resource to the House Bonneville Power Administration Task Force. Dr. Kittredge began his public service career following a successful 15-year private-sector career that included the founding and subsequent sale of two small businesses. Dr. Kittredge received his Ph.D. in 2002 from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. He received his M.S. (public policy) from the University of Oregon, where he was admitted by exception without an undergraduate degree. His voluntary public service includes teaching Practical Economics at the high school level through Junior Achievement. The Veterans Administration awarded certificates recognizing his over 600 volunteer hours counseling Vietnam-era veterans. A native of Cape Cod, he enjoys white water rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. JOHN MATHIESON John (Matty) Mathieson directs the Center for Science, Technology, and Economic Development at SRI International, formerly known as Stanford Research Institute. Mr. Mathieson has over 26 years of project leadership and management at SRI. He has led teams on projects in over 120 countries and 60 states and regions in North America. Mr. Mathieson has expertise in industry development and cluster strategy; technology and regional economic development; corporate and industry growth strategy; economic and commercial policy analysis and reform; trade and investment planning; and financial sector development. Prior to joining SRI, he served as a senior fellow at the Overseas Development Council. He held previous positions in the Treasurers Department of Exxon Corporation, the Economic Planning Council of Taiwan, and The Brookings Institution. Mr. Mathieson received his B.A. in political economics from Williams College, and his M.P.A. in economic policy from Princeton University. He has published and spoken on a wide variety of economic, technology and financial issues. DAVID MCNAMARA Dave McNamara, an experienced Fortune 500 and start-up executive, is senior vice president of SCRA and director of SC Launch! SCRA is a leader in establishing the Knowledge Economy in South Carolina and the

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137 APPENDIX B nation by successfully advancing applied research and technology through collaboration. McNamara provides leadership at SC Launch! by directing all aspects of operations, research, communications, and recommendations of the new SCRA program. SC Launch! supports technology ventures in South Carolina with seed money, counsel, and facilities in an effort to grow high-paying technology jobs in the state. McNamara, who is an adjunct professor at the University of South Carolina and Midlands Technical College, comes to SCRA from two start-ups. At Excelergy, a Lexington, MA, energy software company, McNamara was vice president of North American Market Operations. He managed sales, architecture and customer relationships and was instrumental in the Company’s turn-around. At Conita Technologies, a provider of speech-enabled personal virtual assistants in Columbia, SC, McNamara was vice president of Global Sales. He built sales and reseller channels, established partnerships with companies such as Avaya and Fujitsu, and helped obtain venture funding for the Company. McNamara was vice president, sales, of the Energy, Utility, and Communications Market Unit for Systems & Computer Technology Corp., Columbia, SC, from 1996 to 1999. Under his direction, sales increased 15-fold to $90 million, and a 40-person sales staff was built. During the prior 5 years, he was vice president of sales and marketing at Anchor Continental, a pressure-sensitive tape manufacturer in Columbia, SC. McNamara built sales to $120 million and created an industry- leading customer service function. At South Carolina Electric and Gas, Columbia, SC, McNamara held a variety of top-level executive posts between 1977 and 1991, including vice president of electric marketing and sales. He implemented innovative marketing programs that resulted in dramatic increases in sales and return on investment. He also held vice presidential posts in public affairs, operations, and finance at various subsidiaries. Previously, he was a senior auditor/CPA for Arthur Andersen Co. in Atlanta, GA. McNamara was first in his M.B.A. class at Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, and received a graduate degree in professional accounting. He earned a B.S. in marketing at Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI), Blacksburg, VA. McNamara is a Columbia, SC, resident. KAREN MILLS Karen G. Mills was sworn in April 6, 2009, as the 23rd Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed unanimously by the Senate, Ms. Mills directs a federal agency with more than 2,000 full-time employees, and a leading role helping small business owners and entrepreneurs secure financing, technical assistance, training, and federal contracts. SBA also plays a leading role in disaster recovery by making low interest loans for

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138 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY businesses and residents. With a portfolio of direct and guaranteed business loans and disaster loans worth more than $90 billion, SBA is the nation’s largest single financial backer of small business. Since 1983, Ms. Mills has been an active hands-on investor in and successful manager of small businesses. Ms. Mills also has distinguished herself as a passionate advocate for small business policy that encourages innovation, economic development, and job creation. Most recently, as the president of MMP Group, Ms. Mills invested in and took a leading role in companies involved in the consumer products, food, distribution, textile and industrial components sectors. Prior to that, in the late 1990s, she was a co-founder and a managing director of Solera Capital. Ms. Mills has spent much of her career working with small manufacturing firms, including producers of hardwood flooring, refrigerator motors and plastic injection molding. During the recession of the early 1990s, her hands-on management and commitment to innovation is credited with helping several small manufacturers increase efficiency and competitiveness, and ultimately survive in a tough economy. Her background also includes consulting in the U.S. and Europe for the management consulting firm McKinsey and Co. and product management for General Foods. In 2007, she was appointed by Maine Gov. John Baldacci as chair of the state’s Council on Competitiveness and the Economy, where she focused on attracting investment in rural and regional development initiatives. She also served on the Governor’s Council for the Redevelopment of the Brunswick Naval Air Station. For several years Ms. Mills has been a leading voice in the U.S. competitiveness discussion and is author of an influential Brookings Institution paper on the federal role in regional economic development clusters, geographic concentrations of interconnected businesses that share knowledge and resources to spur innovation, economic growth and higher wage employment. Ms. Mills’ work with boat builders in Maine in using composite materials to increase global competitiveness is one of the leading examples of the success of economic development clusters. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has been vice chairman of the Harvard Overseers. Ms. Mills has an A.B. in economics from Harvard University, and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School where she was a Baker Scholar. Mills and her husband Barry Mills, president of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, have three sons. ED PAISLEY Ed Paisley is vice president for editorial at American Progress. He is a twenty-year veteran of business and finance journalism who joined

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139 APPENDIX B American Progress after successfully launching the specialist Wall Street print and web publication The Deal as its managing editor. At The Deal, he was also responsible for the publication’s award-winning coverage of technology finance and international finance. Before moving to New York to launch The Deal in 1999, Paisley spent a decade in East Asia as an editor and journalist covering business, finance, and politics for the Far Eastern Economic Review, a Dow Jones & Company publication, and Institutional Investor magazine. Paisley served as the editor of Institutional Investor’s Asia edition for five years, winning an Overseas Press Club award for his coverage of the handover of Hong Kong from Britain to China in 1997. From 1989 to 1994, he worked as a print and broadcast journalist for the Far Eastern Economic Review based in Hong Kong and Seoul and traveling throughout East Asia and Southeast Asia. Prior to that, he worked as a correspondent for American Banker newspaper in Washington, D.C., covering domestic and international financial regulation. Paisley earned a master’s degree in East Asian history from Georgetown University in 1984 and a bachelor’s degree in american studies from George Mason University in 1982. He also spent a year as a resident docent at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, where he studied Chinese art history. EDWARD PENHOET Edward Penhoet joined Alta Partners in 2000 as a director. He is a member of the boards of directors of ChemoCentryx, Chimerix, Immune Design, Scynexis, and ZymoGenetics, and serves as the chairman of the board for Metabolex. A co-founder of Chiron, Ed served as the company’s president and chief executive officer from its formation in 1981 until April 1998. He is the vice chair of the Independent Citizens Oversight Committee for the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), and recently served as the president of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. For 10 years prior to founding Chiron, Ed was a faculty member of the Biochemistry Department of the University of California, Berkeley. Ed is the immediate past dean of the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has co-authored more than 50 scientific articles and papers. LUIS PROENZA Dr. Luis M. Proenza is chief executive officer of The University of Akron. In his first 10 years at UA, he has led its transformation into the public research university for northern Ohio and one of the most attractive metropolitan campuses in the nation. Under Dr. Proenza’s

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140 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY leadership, UA has undertaken a $500-million campus enhancement program, a university-community alliance to revitalize a 50-block area surrounding its campus, a BioInnovation Institute in partnership with three area hospitals and a medical school, and academic program enhancements that have made the university one of only 12 Carnegie Cluster Leaders nationally. Dr. Proenza has been involved in national science and technology policy matters since the 1970s when he was study director of the National Research Council-National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Vision, then The University of Georgia's Liaison for Science and Technology Policy, a member of the National Biotechnology Policy Board-National Institutes of Health, and Advisor for Science and Technology Policy to the Governor of Alaska. In 1992, U.S. President George H. W. Bush appointed Dr. Proenza to the U.S. Arctic Research Commission. Dr. Proenza became its vice chairman. He later was chair of the Science and Mathematics Education Task Force for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. In 2001, President George W. Bush named Dr. Proenza to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the nation’s highest-level policy-advisory group for science and technology. Dr. Proenza co-chaired PCAST’s committee on Public-Private Partnerships and worked on panels on U.S. Research and Development Investments, Technology Transfer, Alternative Energy, Energy Efficiency and Advanced Manufacturing, Personalized Medicine, Information Technology, and Nanotechnology. He now serves on the Council on Competitiveness’ executive committee and its National Innovation Initiative Leadership Council, and co-chairs its Regional Leadership Institute Steering Committee. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a board member of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC) and the States Science and Technology Institute, and chair of NASULGC’s Commission on the Urban Agenda. Dr. Proenza is a member of many professional, scholarly and honorary organizations; is the recipient of several awards and honors; has written numerous publications in nationally and internationally recognized journals; and edited and co-edited two books. He is invited frequently to speak worldwide, with presentations appearing in Vital Speeches of the Day and The Executive Speaker. He often is quoted on issues in education, research, economic development, and science and technology policy. As president of The University of Akron, Dr. Proenza has grown it from a $270-million operation to an enterprise with over $435 million in annual revenues. Under his direction, the institution has financed $500 million in construction to completely transform its metropolitan campus, adding 15 new facilities and doing major renovations and additions to 17 others. Dr. Proenza also increased private donations and research funding

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141 APPENDIX B to all-time records and, in 2007, initiated a $500-million comprehensive campaign that already has gained $365 million in gifts and pledges. Recognized as one of the most influential leaders in the region, Dr. Proenza’s acknowledgements include the 2008 Visionary Award, the 2006 Northeast Ohio Regional Vision Award, the 2005 CASE V Chief Executive Leadership Award, and the 2001 SME Executive of the Year Award. After earning a B.A. from Emory University (1965), M.A. from The Ohio State University (1966), and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota (1971), Dr. Proenza joined the faculty of the University of Georgia in 1971. There, his research in psychology and neurobiology was continuously supported by grants from the National Eye Institute, including a Research Career Development Award. Prior to his appointment at Akron, Dr. Proenza was vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School at Purdue University. He also served the University of Alaska first as vice president for academic affairs and research, then as vice chancellor for research and dean of the Graduate School. Dr. Proenza and his wife, Theresa Butler Proenza, enjoy their careers, friends and numerous community activities. Together, they built the 44- foot sailing vessel, Apogee, which they sail on Lake Erie. ANDREW REAMER Andrew Reamer is a fellow in the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program. At Brookings, Dr. Reamer focuses on federal statistical policy and the federal role in regional economic development. He manages the Federal Data Project, which promotes improved availability and accessibility of detailed, accurate, up-to-date federal socioeconomic data on metro areas, cities, and neighborhoods. With Karen Mills and Elisabeth Reynolds, he co-authored “Clusters and Competitiveness: A New Federal Role for Stimulating Regional Economies” in 2008. Between 1984 and 2004, Dr. Reamer founded and managed two economic development and public policy consulting firms that aided U.S. cities and states in understanding how their economies work and how they could work better. In this role, he oversaw the preparation of economic analyses, strategic plans, program evaluations, and resource materials. Efforts for the U.S. Commerce Department included “Technology Transfer and Commercialization: Their Role in Economic Development” and “Socioeconomic Data for Understanding Your Regional Economy: A User’s Guide.” Dr. Reamer received a Master of City Planning and a Ph.D. in economic development and public policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning.

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142 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY JONATHAN SALLET Jonathan Sallet has combined a career in technology, public policy, politics, and the law. Mr. Sallet served in the Clinton/Gore Administration as Assistant to the Secretary and Director of the Office of Policy & Strategic Planning of the Department of Commerce, focusing on economic and technology policy. He was a member of the small group of Administration officials who met regularly with Vice President Al Gore to work on the telecommunications issues that became the Telecommunications Act of 1996; he headed the first White House working group on the deployment of educational technology. Mr. Sallet's professional training is in the law. A graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, he clerked for Associate Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr., and Judge Edward Tamm of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. He was a partner in the law firms of Jenner & Block and Miller, Cassidy, Larroca & Lewin. He is a senior adjunct fellow, Silicon Flatirons at the University of Colorado School of Law; and a member of the advisory board of the American Antitrust Institute. Mr. Sallet served as editor-in-chief of the Virginia Law Review and graduated from Brown University. ROBERT SAMORS Robert J. (Bob) Samors currently serves as associate vice president for research, innovation and STEM education and director of innovation policy at the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU). In that position, Samors is the lead representative for APLU on information technology (IT), intellectual property, and economic development policy. He also serves as the project director for the APLU- Sloan National Commission on Online Learning. In addition, Samors works closely with APLU’s Congressional Affairs staff on federal technology policy issues in Congress and the Executive Branch. Prior to joining APLU, Samors served for seven years as the associate vice president for federal relations for the University of North Carolina system, opening the UNC Washington Office in April 1999. Prior to joining UNC, he was the assistant vice president for research in the University of Michigan Washington office. Samors has also worked for APCO Worldwide (formerly APCO Associates), a Washington consulting firm, and Senator Larry Pressler (R-SD). He holds a masters in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a B.A. in economics from Brown University. MARC STANLEY Mr. Marc G. Stanley has served as director of the Technology Innovation Program (TIP) at the National Institute of Standards and

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143 APPENDIX B Technology (NIST) since December 31, 2007. He was appointed acting director of TIP on September 10, 2007. He also serves as a U.S. governor on the Israel-U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation Board of Governors and as the American director on the Trilateral Industrial Development (TRIDE) Executive Committee. Mr. Stanley served as the director of the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) since June 2003. He was the acting director of ATP from 2001 to 2003 and served as the associate director for ATP from 1993 to 2001. Before coming to NIST, Mr. Stanley was the Associate Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce (DoC) by Presidential appointment. He served as counselor to the NIST Director, as a consultant to DoC’s Technology Administration, and as Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs at DoC. Mr. Stanley earned a B.A. from George Washington University and a Bachelor of Law degree from the University of Baltimore. JEAN TOAL EISEN Jean Toal Eisen was recently named deputy director of the Office of Policy and Strategic Planning at the Department of Commerce. Previously she served as senior advisor and deputy policy director for chairman Daniel K. Inouye on the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. During the 110th Congress, the committee was responsible for shepherding the enactment of 35 significant pieces of legislation into law, including the America COMPETES Act, a reform of America’s consumer product safety laws, the first legislative improvement to automobile fuel economy standards since the 1970s, and the Broadband Data Improvement Act. Previously, she served the committee as senior professional staff member with primary responsibilities for staffing the Democrats on space, science, and technology-related issues. She has worked on legislation on such diverse subjects as NASA, NIST, NSF, commercial space, developing the scientific workforce, the Internet, fire fighting, earthquake and wind hazards, and computer security. A South Carolina native, Ms. Toal Eisen began her career on the Hill as staff assistant then researcher for Senator Ernest F. Hollings. She also worked as a computer network administrator before joining the staff of the Commerce Committee in June 1997. Ms. Toal Eisen earned a baccalaureate degree in mathematics and philosophy from Yale. JIM TURNER Jim Turner is currently director of energy policy at the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. He was recently chief counsel of the House Committee on Science and Technology, with over 30 years of experience as a congressional staff member working on technology and

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144 GROWING INNOVATION CLUSTERS FOR AMERICAN PROSPERITY energy policy. He graduated from Georgetown, Yale, and Westminster College. He was a Clinton Presidential Transition Team member for the Department of Commerce. Jim is a trustee of the University of Virginia’s engineering school (UVA/SEAS) and academic vice chair of the President's Advisory Board at Carnegie Mellon University, H. John Heinz III College. He serves on the board of directors of Scientists and Engineers for America, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the Board of Advisors for MIT Press’s journal Innovation. He chairs UVA/SEAS’s Advisory Board for the Science, Technology, and Society program and provides Washington coordination for the joint MIT/UVA Washington Summer Internship program. He is a member of Innovation Clusters Taskforce at Science Progress of the Center for American Progress. Turner has received standards medals from ASME, ANSI, and ASTM, as well as awards from the World Standards Day, The Association of University Technology Managers, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Virginia Engineering Foundation, the Federal Patent Lawyer Association, the Technology Transfer Society; the National Institute of Building Sciences, the Federal Laboratory Consortium; and the Semiconductor Industry Association. He is an Honorary Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a Fellow of the U.S. Metric Association. He also served on the Presidential Transition Teams for the Obama and Clinton Administrations. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy Scholar and director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-private partnerships, entrepreneurship, early- stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high- technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign governments, universities, research institutes, and international organizations, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. He has a strong commitment to international cooperation, reflected in his work with a wide variety of countries around the world. Dr. Wessner’s work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university-industry clusters, regional development, small-firm finance and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies

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145 APPENDIX B also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and the cooperation between industry, universities, laboratories, and government to capitalize on a nation’s investment in research. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2.3 billion award program for small companies and start-ups. He is also directing a major study on best practice in global innovation programs, entitled Comparative Innovation Policy: Best Practice for the 21st Century. Today’s meeting on Growing Innovation Clusters for American Prosperity forms part of a complementary analysis entitled Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State & Regional Innovation Initiatives. The overarching goal of Dr. Wessner’s work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security.

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