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Committee Biographies ROBERT N. BUTLER (co-chairman) is BrookdaTe Professor and chairman of the Gerald and May Ellen Ritter Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development, Mount Sinai Medical Cen- ter, New York Citythe nation's first medical-school department of geriatrics. He was a principal investigator in one of the first comprehensive longitudinal studies of the health of community- residing elderly, conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health (195~1966~. He was founding director of the National Institute on Aging (197~1982~. In 1976, he won the Pulitzer Prize in nonfiction for Why Survive? Being Id in America. Dr. Butler is editor-in-chief of Geriatrics. He is a member of the Advisory Council of the New York-New Jersey Center on En- vironmental and Occupational Health, chairs programs for the Commonwealth Foundation and Brookdale Foundation, serves on the U.S. Congress Physicians Payment Review Commission, and helped found the American Federation for Aging Research and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association, on whose boards he serves. EMIL PFITZER (cmcha~rman) is assistant vice-president and group director of the Department of Toxicology and Pathology at Hoffmann-I.a Roche Inc., where he is responsible for the design, conduct, and interpretation of toxicologic chemicals. He holds 213

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214 ABOUT THE A UTHORS appointments as adjunct professor at Rutgers University and the New York University Institute of Environmental Medicine. He was president of the Society of Toxicology in 1985-1986 and is a member of a number of national scientific organizations. He was certified in general toxicology by the American Board of Toxicology, Inc., in 1980. In addition to his work at Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., he has served on the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Training Grant Review Committee, on advisory boards for the National Center for Toxicological Research and the Brookhaven National Laboratory Medical Department, and on several National Research Council committees. Dr. Pfitzer's publications include several book chapters on the principles of dos~efl.ect and dose- response relationships. PATRICIA A. BUFFLER is professor of epidern~ology and director of the Epidemiology Research Unit in the University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston School of Public Health. She has served on numerous National Research Council com- mittees, as chairman of the World Health Organization Expert Committee on Women, Works and Health, and on various other expert and research review groups for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of En- ergy, and WHO. Dr. Buffler is the immediate past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and is a member of the executive board of the American College of Epidemiology. Her current research is in the epidemiology of occupational cancer, reproductive risks, pulmonary diseases, and epidemiologic studies of environmentally induced disease. FREDERICK J. DE SERRES is director of the Center for Life Sciences and Toxicology in the Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina. His numerous publications include papers on the genetic effects of radiation and environmental chemicals and on the development, validation, and use of short-term tests to detect environmental mutagens and carcinogens. He has served as chair- man of the WHO/International Program on Chemical Safety's working group on the validation of short-term tests for carcino- gens. He serves as chairman of several national and international committees dealing with toxicology. He is a member of the Ameri- can Environmental Mutagen Society, the European Environmental Mutagen Society, the American Association for Cancer Research,

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ABOUT THE A UTHORS 215 the Genetics Society of America, and the International Comma - sion for Protection Against Environmental Mutagens and Car- cinoger~s. He also serves as adjunct professor of pathology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. BARBARA GILCEREST is professor and chairman of derma- tology at Boston University School of Medicine and senior scientist at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. She is chairman of the Aging Review Committee of the National Institute on Aging, a member of the National Scientific Advisory Council of the American Federation for Aging Research, director of the American Board of Dermatology, and a member of the board of directors of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. Her research involves the effect of chronologic aging and environ- menta] impact on the behavior of cultured skin-derived cells. Dr. GiTchrest is the author of more than 130 articles, reviews, textbook chapters, and abstracts and the author/editor of two recent books ~ - coIlcerillOg SR1H dogleg. RONALD W. HART is director of the National Center for Toxicological Research, a position he has held since 1980. Be- fore joining FDA, he served as professor of radiology with cross appointments as professor in medicine and zoology and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Currently, he holds adjunct professorships at the University of Arkansa for Medical Sciences at Little Rock, Arkansas and the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences at Memphis, Tennessee. He has published numerous articles on toxicology, gerontology, carcinogenesis, bio- chemistry, molecular biology, organic chemistry, and radiation biology/oncology. Dr. Hart serves as chair of the Department of Health and Human Services' Committee to Coordinate Environmental Health and Relateci Programs; chair of the Science Panel's Cabinet Coun- ci} Agent Orange Working Group; and chair of the Color Additive Scientific Review Panel. He has served as a member of the Na- tional Research Councii's Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health Hazards, and as chairman of the White House Office of Sci- ence and Technology Policy's Task Force on Chemical Carcinogens for a review of the science and its associated principles of the con- sensus workshop on formaldehyde, of the international consensus symposium on risk assessment, and of the World Congress on Toxicology. He has received the KarI-August-Forster Award, the

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216 ABOUT ICE AUTHORS FDA Award of Merit, the Public Health Service Superior Service Award, and the Governor's Award for Outstanding Service to the State of Arkansas. THOMAS E. JOHNSON is assist ant professor of molecular genetics in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry in the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Johnson ~ a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the American Federation for Aging Research and is active in both those organizations. He is a member of the Genetics Society of America, the Society for Developmental Biology, and the Behavioral Genetics Association. He has served as a reviewer for most major journals in biologic gerontology and genetics and for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. His research interests are in the genetic dissection of the aging processes, primarily through the use of long-lived genetic variants of the free-living nematode Cacnorhabditis elegant. CART KUPFER is director of the National Eye Institute, in which capacity, he is responsible for laboratory and clinical re- search programs in vision in the intramural laboratories ant] in research organizations nationwide. His interests also extend to activities regarding blindness in the developing world. He is pres- ident of the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, director of the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center at the National Eye Institute, and a consultant to WHO. GEORGE MARTIN is professor of pathology, adjunct profes- sor of genetics, and director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center at the University of Washington. He has chaired the Na- tional Institute on Aging's Aging Research Review Committee, has been chairman of a task force to develop a National Research Plan on Aging, and has been a member of the National Advisory Council. In 1981, Dr. Martin received the Brookciaie Award of the Gerontological Society of America for his research contributions to basic biologic and clinical aspects of gerontology. His major focus has been on genetic approaches to the study of mechanisms of aging. EDWARD J. MASORO is professor and chairman of the De- partment of Physiology in the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. His research focus is the use of nutritional manipulations as tools for studying basic aging processes. He was

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ABOUT THE A UTHORS 217 a member and chairman of the Aging Review Committee of the National Institute on Aging. He is now chairman of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute on Aging, editor for biologic sciences of Experimental Aging Research, and on the editorial boards of Journal of Gerontology, Experimental Geron- tology, and Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and; Medicine. DAVID M. PRESCOTT is distinguished professor of molecu- lar, cellular, and developmental biology at the University of Col- orado, Boulder. He ~ a member of the National Academy of Sci- ences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and past president of the American Society for Cell Biology. He received a senior U.S. scientist award for 197~1980 from the Alexander van Humboldt Foundation of the Federation Republic of Germany. He has served on study sections/panels for the American Cancer So- ciety, the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. He was editor of Methods in Cell Biology and co-editor of Advances in Cell Biology and Cell Biology: A Comprehensive Treatise. He is author of Reproduction of Eukaryotsc Cell and Cell Biology and co-author of Cancer: The Misguided Cell. He served on the edito- rial boards of Experimental Cell Research, Cancer Research, and The Journal of Biological Chemistry. HE research interests include cell growth and reproduction, structure of genes and chromosomes, cancer biology, DNA replication and sequences, transcription regu- lation, RNA synthesis and processing, and nucleotide metabolism. PETER S. SPENCER is professor of neuroscience, neurology, and pathology ant] director of the Institute of Neurotoxicology in the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He is a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxi- cology of the Nations Research Council and a former member of its Committee on Toxicology, alla he is a past president of the specialty section on neurotoxicology of the Society of Toxicology. His research activities focus on molecular and cellular mechanisms of age-associated disorders of the human nervous system and es- peciaIly on the impact of environmental toxins on the health of developing peoples. ELLIOT VESELL is Evan Pugh Professor of Pharmacology

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218 ABOUT THE AUTHORS and chairman of the Department of Pharmacology at the PennsyI- vania State University College of Medicine in Hershey, PennsyI- vania. He graduated from Harvard College in 1955 and Harvard Medical School in 1959. He did his residency training at Man sachusetts General Hospital and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. From 1960 to 1962 he was a research associate and assistant physi- cian at Rockefeller University. From 1963-1965 he was a clinical associate at the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Dis- eases, NIH. From 1965-1968, he served in the National Heart and Lung Institute, NTH, as the head, Section on Pharmacogenetics, Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology. In 1971 he received from the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Ther- apeutics the award for Experimental Therapeutics. In 1985 he was selected for their Harry Gold Award in clinical pharmacology. Also in 1985, he served for three weeks in the United Kingdom as Frohlich Professor of the Royal Society of Medicine. He has been selected twice as Burroughs WelIcome Visiting Professor of Clinical Pharmacology, twelve times as Pfizer Lecturer, and also gave the Alian Bass Lecture at Vanderbilt University and the Hahnemann Lecture at the University of California, San Francisco. ROBERT E. VESTAL is associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle, and associate chief of staff for research and development in the Veterans' Administration Medi- cal Center in Boise, Idaho, where he also is chief of the Clinical Pharmacology and Gerontology Research Unit. For the last 14 years, Dr. Vestal has conducted clinical research on the effects of aging on drug metabolism, drug response, and drug interactions, including the influence of cigarette smoking; he has also edited a book on drug treatment in the elderly. He Berries on the editorial boards of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Clinical Phar- macokinetics, and the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society and on the Veterans' Administration Merit Board for Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (Clinical Pharmacology). He is chairman of the executive committee of the clinical pharmacology division of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Ther- apeutics, vice-chairman of the ad hoc committee on drugs in the elderly of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Clinical Pharmacology, the Gerontolog- ical Society of America, and the American Geriatrics Society. In

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ABOUT THE A UTHORS 219 1980, he was a member of the World Health Organization Techni- cal Group on Use of Medicaments by the Elderly. MARC E. WEKSLER ~ the Irving S. Wright Professor of Medicine and director of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontol- ogy in the Corned University Medical Center in New York City. He is an immunologist and cell biologist by training, and his re- search has defined the cellular and molecular bash of changes in the immune system, in the blood vesseh, and In tumor growth that accompany aging. He is the chairman of the Geriatrics Medical Knowledge program of the American College of Physicians and a consultant to the World Health Organization and U.S. Veter- ans' Adm~n~tration. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. JERRY R. WILLIAMS Is professor of oncology and director of the Radiobiology Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center and is a member of the Environmental Health Sciences Department of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He ~ a member of the Radiation Research Society, the American Society of Photobiology, the European Society of Pho- tobiology, the Environmental Mutagen Society, the Gerontological Society of America, the Radiological Society of North America, and the Tissue Culture Society. He has served on various review groups for the National Institutes of Health and the Environ- mental Protection Agency and has represented the United States in formulating health safety guiclelines with the Organization for Economic Co operation and Development. His current research in- terests include the interaction of environmental agents on human health and new methods in the treatment of human cancer.

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