Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Nanette K. Wenger, M.D., is a professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine, chief of cardiology at Grady Memorial Hospital, and a consultant to the Emory Heart and Vascular Center. One of her major clinical and research interests is coronary heart disease in women, and she is an expert on heart disease in the elderly and in cardiac rehabilitation. She has served as vice president of the American Heart Association (AHA), governor for Georgia of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and president of the Georgia Heart Association. Dr. Wenger also has served as a member and frequent chair of more than 500 committees, scientific advisory boards, task forces, and councils of the American Medical Association; ACC; AHA; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); and Society of Geriatric Cardiology. She is a fellow of the AHA, Society of Geriatric Cardiology, American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and American College of Chest Physicians. She is a master of the American College of Physicians and of ACC. Dr. Wenger served as a member of the IOM Committee on Acute Myocardial Infarction. She is a graduate of Hunter College (summa cum laude) and Harvard Medical School. She had her residency training in internal medicine and cardiology fellowship at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and an additional fellowship in cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine.


William E. Boden, M.D., is a professor of medicine and preventive medicine at the State University of New York–Buffalo Schools of Medicine and



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 235
Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Nanette K. Wenger, M.D., is a professor of medicine in the Division of Car- diology at the Emory University School of Medicine, chief of cardiology at Grady Memorial Hospital, and a consultant to the Emory Heart and Vascular Center. One of her major clinical and research interests is coronary heart disease in women, and she is an expert on heart disease in the elderly and in cardiac rehabilitation. She has served as vice president of the American Heart Association (AHA), governor for Georgia of the American College of Car- diology (ACC), and president of the Georgia Heart Association. Dr. Wenger also has served as a member and frequent chair of more than 500 commit- tees, scientific advisory boards, task forces, and councils of the American Medical Association; ACC; AHA; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); and Society of Geriatric Cardiology. She is a fellow of the AHA, Society of Geriatric Cardiology, American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and American College of Chest Physicians. She is a master of the American College of Physicians and of ACC. Dr. Wenger served as a member of the IOM Committee on Acute Myocardial Infarction. She is a graduate of Hunter College (summa cum laude) and Harvard Medical School. She had her residency training in internal medicine and cardiology fellowship at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and an additional fellowship in cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine. William E. Boden, M.D., is a professor of medicine and preventive medi- cine at the State University of New York–Buffalo Schools of Medicine and 

OCR for page 235
  CaRdIoVaSCUlaR dISabIlIty Public Health. He is director of Cardiovascular Services at Kaleida Health System in western New York and chief of cardiology at Buffalo General and Millard Fillmore Hospitals in Buffalo. Since 1979, Dr. Boden has held university appointments at Brown University, Wayne State University, Tufts New England Medical Center, Boston University, the University of Connecticut, and currently at the State University of New York–Buffalo. His principal research interests include studies in post-myocardial infarction (MI) secondary prevention, acute coronary syndromes and unstable angina, congestive heart failure and dyslipidemia in post-MI, and coronary artery disease (CAD). He has worked extensively in the clinical trials arena of non- Q-wave MI and in assessing the role of calcium antagonists in patients with ischemic heart disease, notably in non-Q-wave MI secondary prevention. Dr. Boden has been involved in clinical research investigator activities as the project director, study chair, and cochair for multicenter clinical trials, and served as a principal investigator, steering committee member, and consultant for numerous clinical research grant activities funded by the De- partment of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and industry. He was the study chair and cochairman for the VANQWISH and INTERCEPT trials, respectively. Currently he is the study cochair and lead investigator in the COURAGE trial (the largest randomized trial comparison of percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI] versus optimal medical therapy in stable CAD patients). He is the study cochair of the NIH-funded AIM-HIGH trial evaluating the long-term role of combina- tion dyslipidemic therapy (niacin and statin versus statin) in CAD patients with low HDL cholesterol. Dr. Boden has lectured widely and written more than 350 peer-reviewed publications, original articles, books, chapters, and abstracts. He has been selected as one of the best doctors in america continuously since 2003. He is a member of several professional cardiology organizations as well as a member of the editorial boards of the american Journal of Cardiology, the Journal of the american College of Cardiology, and Clinical Cardiology. Dr. Boden also serves as an editorial reviewer for the new England Journal of medicine, the annals of Internal medicine, Circulation, the Journal of the american medical association, the american heart Journal, and the archives of Internal medicine. He received his M.D. from the State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse. Dr. Boden performed his internal medicine training at Boston University Medical Center and completed his fellowship training in cardiology at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine and in the subspecialty of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Blase A. Carabello, M.D., is a professor of medicine and the vice chair of the Department of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. He is currently vice president of Programs and Education for the Heart Valve Society of

OCR for page 235
 aPPEndIx a America, and he serves as Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center’s Medical Care Line Executive. He has served as chair of the AHA physiology study section and has more than 200 publications exploring the physiology and cell biology of valvular heart disease and its role in causing congestive heart failure. Dr. Carabello is an author of the joint AHA/ACC 2006 guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease. He attended medical school at Temple University in Philadelphia. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital–Harvard Medical School and his cardiology fellowship at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital–Harvard Medical School. Robert M. Carney, Ph.D., is a professor of psychiatry and the director of the Behavioral Medicine Center at the Washington University School of Medicine. He is a licensed psychologist specializing in cognitive behavior therapy for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders in medical patients. He is a fellow of the Society of Behavioral Medicine and an elected member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. Dr. Carney has been an active researcher in the area of depression and comorbid medical illness, especially heart disease, for more than 20 years. He was a member of the Aging and Medical Co-morbidity subcommittee for the develop- ment of the National Institute of Mental Health’s strategic plan for mood disorders. He has also served as a reviewer for research proposals in this area for NIH, the Medical Research Council of Canada, and the Depart- ment of Veterans Affairs Scientific Research and Development Committee. Dr. Carney’s major research focus is on the relationship of depression to medical morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. He was a member of the executive and steering committees for the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) clinical trial, designed to determine whether treating depression and improving social support increases survival in patients with a recent MI. He is currently studying the relationship of sleep disorders to cardiac events in depressed cardiovascular heart disease patients, and the relationship of altered autonomic nervous system functioning and mortality in depressed patients with a recent acute myocardial infarction. Dr. Carney has a B.A. in psychology and a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Washington University in Missouri. Manuel D. Cerqueira, M.D., is chair of nuclear medicine in the Imaging Institute and a staff cardiologist in the Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. He has a special clinical and research interest in using cardiovascular imaging methods to identify patients with CAD and those at high risk for having heart attacks or dying from a cardiac cause. Prior to his appointment to the Cleveland Clinic in 2004, Dr. Cerqueira was chief of cardiology at Georgetown University Medical Center. He also

OCR for page 235
  CaRdIoVaSCUlaR dISabIlIty served as a consultant in nuclear cardiology to NIH. During his tenure at Georgetown, he was also director of nuclear cardiology, the Exercise Stress Testing Laboratory, and cardiac rehabilitation. He was a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Radiology at Georgetown and in the Depart- ment of Radiology and Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. He was also chief of nuclear medicine at the VA Medi- cal Center. Dr. Cerqueira is a grant reviewer for NIH. He works in many capacities with the Journal of nuclear Cardiology, american Journal of Cardiology, american Journal of Roentgenology, Journal of the american College of Cardiology, and European Journal of nuclear medicine, among others. He is widely published, authoring or coauthoring more than 170 articles, 26 book chapters, and 95 abstracts on issues related to clinical and research findings. A native of Portugal, Dr. Cerqueira did his undergradu- ate work at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and received his M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. He did an internship and residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Medical Center in New York City, where he became chief resident in internal medicine. He continued his clinical training with a fellowship in cardiology from Yale–New Haven Hospital in Connecticut, and continued on at the hospi- tal, becoming chief resident in nuclear medicine. He is certified in internal medicine, nuclear medicine, CVD, and nuclear cardiology. Michael H. Criqui, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor and the chief of the Divi- sion of Preventive Medicine in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, a professor of cardiology in the Department of Medicine, and the director of the Preventive Cardiology Academic Award, all at the University of California–San Diego School of Medicine. He is an active investiga- tor in cardiovascular epidemiology and preventive cardiology, and he has made substantial contributions in the fields of peripheral artery disease, subclinical atherosclerosis, peripheral venous disease, and ethnic differ- ences in CVD. He currently chairs the International Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Working Group for the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study, sponsored by the World Health Organization. He is senior consultant to the editorial board for the Journal of the american College of Cardiology. Honors include election as a distinguished scientist of AHA in 2010; the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention of AHA in 2008; the Special Recognition Award from the AHA Council on Epidemiology and Prevention in 2004; the Fredrick H. Epstein Memorial Lecture Award from the Working Group on Epidemiology and Prevention of the European Society of Cardiology in 2002; and the Joseph E. Stokes III Preventive Cardiology Award from the American Society for Preventive Cardiology in 2001. He has an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University

OCR for page 235
 aPPEndIx a of California–Berkeley and an M.D. from the University of California–San Francisco, and he is board certified in general preventive medicine. Andrew E. Epstein, M.D., is a professor of medicine, Cardiovascular Division, at the University of Pennsylvania, and the chief of the Cardiology Section at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. He is a fellow of ACC, the Council on Clinical Cardiology of AHA, and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). For AHA he has served as chair of its committees on sudden car- diac death and on electrocardiography and arrhythmias. He is currently chair of the ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline Committee for the Implantation of Cardiac Pacemakers and Antiarrhythmic Devices. His teaching awards at the University of Alabama–Birmingham include a “10 Best Teachers” award from the Department of Medicine in 1998 and 2008, the Cobbs-Rutsky Clinical Excellence Award from the Department of Medicine in 2006, and the H. Cecil Coghlan Teaching Excellence Award for the Division of Cardiovascular Disease in 2006. Dr. Epstein’s research interests are in the management of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. He has been involved in numerous clinical trials, and he chaired the recruitment committees for the NIH/NHLBI-sponsored Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST), the Antiarrhythmics versus Implantable Defibrillators (AVID) Study, the Atrial Fibrillation Follow-up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) Study, and the Dual Chamber and VVI Implantable Defibrillator (DAVID) Trial. He has authored several hundred papers, abstracts, book chapters, and reviews and has edited two books. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, the Journal of Interven- tional Cardiac Electrophysiology (as an associate editor), heart Rhythm, PaCE, and the american Journal of Cardiology. He graduated from Amherst College and the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. After completing his internship and residency in internal medicine at Wash- ington University/Barnes Hospital, Dr. Epstein moved to the University of Alabama, where he completed his fellowship in cardiovascular medicine and joined the faculty in 1982. He remained there until 2009, when he was recruited to Philadelphia. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology, and clinical cardiac electrophysiology. Erika S. Froelicher, R.N., Ph.D., is a professor at the University of California–San Francisco School of Nursing in the Department of Physi- ological Nursing, with a collaborative appointment in the Occupational Health Program in the Community Health Systems Department, as well as a joint appointment in epidemiology and biostatistics in the School of Medi- cine. Her research is in the areas of primary, secondary, and tertiary (re- habilitation) prevention through nursing interventions to reduce CVD risk factors (smoking cessation and relapse prevention, psychosocial risk factors

OCR for page 235
40 40 CaRdIoVaSCUlaR dISabIlIty with depression in particular, exercise, blood pressure, lipids, obesity, and relapse prevention) as well as social isolation. She has a strong interest in physiological, psychosocial, and economic issues relevant to her expertise in methods, design, and epidemiology. Dr. Froelicher has a broad perspec- tive because she is trilingual and tricultural and has extensive experience in international health through research consultation, education, and teach- ing. Dr. Froelicher’s recent major research projects included participating in the ENRICHD project at the Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. She is also involved in the Women’s Initiative for Nonsmoking (or WINS), a randomized clinical trial to test the short- and long-term efficacy of a nurse-managed smoking cessation and relapse pre- vention program for women smokers hospitalized for CVD. Dr. Froelicher has an extensive publication record in nursing and in epidemiology and biostatistics. Her Ph.D. in epidemiology and her M.P.H. are from the Uni- versity of California–Los Angeles. Her M.A. in nursing is from the Univer- sity of Washington in Seattle. She has a diploma in nursing from Queen Mary’s Hospital in London, with certificates in midwifery from the City of London Maternity Hospital and in psychiatric nursing from Charing Cross Hospital in London. Gary H. Gibbons, M.D., is a professor of medicine and the director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. He directs research in the fields of vascular biology, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular medicine. His program has made impor- tant contributions to the understanding of how humoral factors that regu- late blood pressure activate molecular pathways that predispose to vascular complications, such as stroke and heart attacks. His laboratory currently focuses on defining the molecular basis of vascular disease by integrating DNA microarray technology and epigenetics with genetically engineered mouse models. In addition, he is collaborating with genetic epidemiolo- gists to define the role of gene–environment interactions as determinants of ethnic disparities in CVD. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Dr. Gibbons received his A.B. in biology from Princeton University and his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Mark A. Hlatky, M.D., is a professor of health research and policy and a professor of medicine (cardiovascular medicine) at Stanford University. His major interests are in outcomes research, evidence-based medicine, and cost-effectiveness analysis. He has studied the effects of CVD and therapies on economics, quality of life, and employment outcomes. He has served on the Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Advisory Committee and the Medical Advisory Panel of the Technology Evaluation Center of the

OCR for page 235
4 aPPEndIx a Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, as well as on several national com- mittees of ACC, AHA, and NHLBI. He is an associate editor of the Journal of the american College of Cardiology. Dr. Hlatky received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and, after residency at the University of Ari- zona, studied as a Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar at the University of California–San Francisco. He trained in cardiology at Duke University Medical Center, and then joined the Duke faculty. He has been on the fac- ulty of Stanford University School of Medicine since 1989. Alice K. Jacobs, M.D., is a professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and the director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and Interventional Cardiology at Boston Medical Center. She is a recent past president of AHA. She is also involved in local AHA activities and served as the president of the northeast affiliate in 2002–2003. Dr. Jacobs has been a member of several ACC writing groups, establishing training criteria in interventional cardiology, assessing and maintaining competence in inter- ventional cardiology, and updating the ACC/AHA guidelines for the perfor- mance of PCI. Dr. Jacobs currently serves as chair of the ACC/AHA Task Force on Practice Guidelines. She was recently elected vice president of the Association of University Cardiologists, and she is a member of the Ameri- can Board of Internal Medicine Interventional Cardiology Self-Assessment Test Committee and the New York State Cardiac Advisory Committee. Dr. Jacobs’ major research interest is in coronary revascularization strate- gies. Currently, she is leading AHA’s Mission: Lifeline, a community-based, national initiative to develop systems of care to improve the quality of care and outcomes of patients with ST-elevation MI. Dr. Jacobs is principal in- vestigator of the MASS COMM trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of coronary angioplasty performed in community hospitals without onsite cardiac surgery in Massachusetts. She serves on the steering committees of several multicenter trials, including the NHLBI-funded BARI 2-D in the NHLBI Dynamic Registry. She is also interested in heart disease in women and the sex-based differences in the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of ischemic heart disease. Dr. Jacobs is board certified in internal medicine, CVD, and interventional cardiology. Karen S. Kuehl, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor of pediatrics at the George Washington University Medical School. Among her academic appointments, she is the director of the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program at Chil- dren’s National Medical Center, a professor of pediatrics at George Wash- ington University Medical School, and a member of the Children’s Research Institute in the Center for Health Services and Clinical Research. Among her honors, Dr. Kuehl was recognized as a National Merit Scholar and National Research Fellow and received an Award of Merit for Research, Montgomery

OCR for page 235
4 4 CaRdIoVaSCUlaR dISabIlIty County. In addition to her academic appointments, she is currently a mem- ber of the Children’s National Health Network Board, and of the Medical Advisory Board of the Adult Congenital Heart Association. Dr. Kuehl earned her B.A. from Swarthmore College, her M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and her M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University. Todd D. Miller, M.D., currently serves as a consultant of cardiovascular medicine and the codirector of the nuclear cardiology laboratory at the Mayo Clinic. Since 1999, he has also served as a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. Among his many awards are the Mayo Fellows Association Teacher of the Year and the Mayo Outstand- ing Teacher of Physical Exam Skills. In addition to serving on the editorial board of the Journal of nuclear Cardiology, Dr. Miller is an editorial board member for the american heart Journal. He has been a reviewer for more than 30 peer-reviewed journals, and is a guest editor for the Journal of the american College of Cardiology and american heart Journal. He received his M.D. and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago. Lynne W. Stevenson, M.D., is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the codirector of the Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure Pro- gram at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Her major commitments are to ensure that multiple options are developed and offered in parallel to patients with advanced heart disease, and that there will be continuing entry of new cardiologists dedicated to refining the physiologic basis and art of caring for patients with heart failure. Her early research focused on the central role of reversible congestion in the symptoms, valvular regurgitation, and prognosis of advanced heart failure. Dr. Stevenson has been involved in the conception and culmination of the recent NHLBI REMATCH and ESCAPE trials and the launch in 2006 of the INTERMACS Registry for Mechanical Circulatory Support. She has been the chair of the Heart Failure and Transplant Com- mittee for ACC, a member of the Board of Directors for the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, and a member of the Executive Board of the Clinical Council of AHA. She chaired the Consensus Confer- ence on Mechanical Cardiac Support in 2000, and she serves on the heart failure guideline committees for ACC, AHA, and the Heart Failure Society of America. She has participated on advisory panels for NHLBI on heart failure, cardiorenal connections in heart disease, and the role of future ven- tricular assist devices; the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; and the Joint Commission. She was selected as an NIH Great Teacher in 2004. She received her M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine and is certified in internal medicine, with a subcertification in CVD.

OCR for page 235
4 aPPEndIx a CONSULTANT Howard H. Goldman, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is a professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. His expertise is in evaluating mental health services and financing programs and policies. He is the director of the Network on Mental Health Policy Research (The Network), funded by the MacArthur Foundation. The Network is the sponsor of several stud- ies on mental health financing and disability policy. Dr. Goldman is currently a member of the executive committee of the Social Security Administration (SSA) Mental Health Treatment Study, a trial of supported employment and enhanced treatment for 2,000 Social Security Disability Insurance benefi- ciaries with schizophrenia or a mood disorder who are interested in work- ing. He also served as principal investigator of the study team conducting the Evaluation of the Implementation and Impact of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Parity in the Federal Employees Health Benefits program, sponsored by the federal government. He served as the senior scientific edi- tor of the Surgeon general’s Report on mental health from 1997 to 1999, for which he was awarded the Surgeon General’s Medallion. During 2002 and 2003, Dr. Goldman was a consultant to the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. He is the editor of Psychiatric Services, a mental health services research and policy journal published monthly by the American Psychiatric Association. He also serves on the editorial boards of several other journals, including the american Journal of Psychiatry and the Journal of mental health Policy and Economics. Dr. Goldman received joint M.D.-M.P.H. degrees from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in social policy research from the Heller School at Brandeis University. He is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, having served on its disability policy panel, and he is an IOM member. He served on IOM’s Committee on Medical Evaluation of Veterans for Disability Compensation. PRINCIPAL STAFF Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, M.D., M.P.H., is currently the director of IOM’s Board on the Health of Select Populations and the Medical Follow- up Agency. Prior to joining the IOM, he was a career military physician in the U.S. Army. While in the military, he served as chief of several large departments of preventive medicine at U.S. and overseas installations. He also was commander of the military community hospital at Ft. Carson, Colorado, and later served as hospital commander for the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Dr. Erdtmann had several assignments at the Army Surgeon General’s Office, where he worked on military health care poli- cies. The board that Dr. Erdtmann directs was responsible for managing a major study involving SSA’s disability decision process and two other VA

OCR for page 235
44 44 CaRdIoVaSCUlaR dISabIlIty disability-related studies in the recent past. He received his undergraduate degree from Bucknell University and his M.P.H. from the University of California–Berkeley. He is a graduate of Temple University Medical School and is board certified in preventive medicine. Michael McGeary is a senior program officer on the Board on the Health of Select Populations, serving as director of the Committee of Medical Ex- perts to Assist Social Security on Disability Issues and the Committee on Social Security Cardiovascular Disability Criteria. He is a political scientist specializing in health, science, and technology policy analysis and program evaluation. Before 2004, he was an independent consultant to government agencies, foundations, and nonprofit organizations in issues of science and technology. Between 1981 and 1995, Mr. McGeary was a senior staff of- ficer at the IOM and the National Academy of Sciences, where he produced more than a dozen major reports on topics such as federal funding of re- search and development; graduate education and employment of scientists and engineers; and priority setting, funding, and management of the NIH. From 2004 to 2007, he was staff director for IOM committees that rec- ommended improvements in the SSA and VA systems for determining dis- ability. Mr. McGeary is a graduate of Harvard College and has completed all requirements for a doctorate in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology except the dissertation. Susan R. McCutchen, M.A., is a senior program associate on the Board on the Health of Select Populations. She has been on staff at the National Academies since 1981 and has worked in several institutional divisions and with many boards, committees, and panels within those units. The stud- ies in which she has participated have addressed a broad range of subjects and focused on a variety of issues related to science and technology for international development, technology transfer, aeronautics and the U.S. space program, natural disaster mitigation, U.S. education policy and sci- ence curricula, needle exchange for the prevention of HIV transmission, the scientific merit of the polygraph, human factors and engineering, research ethics, health hazard evaluation, medical and public health preparedness for catastrophic events, including terrorist nuclear detonations, and disability compensation programs. Ms. McCutchen has assisted in the production of more than 50 publications and was an editor for a st Century System for Evaluating Veterans for disability benefits and for assessing medical Preparedness to Respond to a terrorist nuclear Event: Workshop Report. She has a B.A. in French, with minors in Italian and Spanish, from Ohio’s Miami University, and an M.A. in French, with a minor in English, from Kent State University.

OCR for page 235
4 aPPEndIx a Erin E. Wilhelm, M.P.H., is a research associate with the Board on the Health of Select Populations, serving both the Committee on Social Security Cardiovascular Disability Criteria and the Committee on Social Security HIV Disability Criteria. She is a health policy researcher and writer with experience in global health, nutrition, and flood disasters and their impact on mental health and disability issues. Prior to joining the IOM and the Na- tional Academies in 2009, Ms. Wilhelm served as a guest researcher at the NIH Fogarty International Center, where she contributed to a literature re- view and portfolio analysis for the Trans-NIH Working Group on Climate Change and Health. She has served as a publications editor for the Corpo- rate Executive Board, a best practice research firm in Washington, D.C., and as a staff writer for the St. Petersburg times in Florida. Ms. Wilhelm holds an M.P.H. in global health from George Washington University and a dual B.A. in broadcast journalism and political science from the University of South Florida. Lavita D. Coates-Fogle is a senior program assistant with the Board on the Health of Select Populations and serves the Committee of Medical Experts to Assist Social Security on Disability Issues and the Committee on Social Security Cardiovascular Disability Criteria. Prior to joining the National Academies in 2008, Ms. Coates-Fogle spent 5 years with the Department of Defense, where she served as a program analyst and contributed to the streamlining of administrative processes and procedures. She is a certi- fied event planner and is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in communications.

OCR for page 235