Appendix E
Committee Member and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

Paul Volberding, M.D. (Chair), serves as professor and vice chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California–San Francisco (UCSF) and chief of the Medical Service at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He is the Principal Investigator and codirector of the UCSF-Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology Center for AIDS Research. He chairs the Scientific Advisory Board of the Infectious Disease Institute of Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. For 20 years, Dr. Volberding’s professional activities centered on San Francisco General Hospital, where he established a model program of AIDS patient care, research, and professional education. He became the chief of the Medical Service at the San Francisco VA Medical Center in 2001. His research career began with investigations of HIV-related malignancies, especially Kaposi’s sarcoma. His primary research focus, however, shifted to clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. He has been instrumental in testing many compounds, including early studies in asymptomatic infection that led to the concept of HIV disease, not simply AIDS as the target of treatment. Dr. Volberding has written many research and review articles. He is coeditor in chief of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, and a founder of HIV InSite, a comprehensive source of HIV information. He served as coeditor of the major textbook Global HIV/AIDS Medicine. He is the founder and chair of the Board of the International AIDS Society—USA. He has served as president of the HIV Medical Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and of the International AIDS Society. He was



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Appendix E Committee Member and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES Paul Volberding, M.D. (Chair), serves as professor and vice chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California–San Francisco (UCSF) and chief of the Medical Service at the San Francisco Veterans Af- fairs Medical Center. He is the Principal Investigator and codirector of the UCSF-Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology Center for AIDS Research. He chairs the Scientific Advisory Board of the Infectious Dis- ease Institute of Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. For 20 years, Dr. Volberding’s professional activities centered on San Francisco General Hospital, where he established a model program of AIDS patient care, research, and professional education. He became the chief of the Medical Service at the San Francisco VA Medical Center in 2001. His research career began with investigations of HIV-related malignancies, especially Kaposi’s sarcoma. His primary research focus, however, shifted to clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. He has been instrumental in testing many compounds, including early studies in asymptomatic infection that led to the concept of HIV disease, not simply AIDS as the target of treatment. Dr. Volberding has written many research and review articles. He is coeditor in chief of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, and a founder of HIV InSite, a comprehensive source of HIV information. He served as coeditor of the major textbook Global HIV/AIDS Medicine. He is the founder and chair of the Board of the International AIDS Society—USA. He has served as president of the HIV Medical Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and of the International AIDS Society. He was 

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 HIV AND DISABILITY elected a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1999. He has served on several IOM committees, including the first review of the AIDS epidemic, Confronting AIDS, in 1986, and No Time to Lose, an assessment of HIV prevention programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Preven- tion (CDC) in 2001. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Chicago and the University of Minnesota, respectively, and finished training at the University of Utah and UCSF, where he studied for 2 years as a Research Fellow in the virology laboratory of Dr. Jay Levy, later a codiscoverer of HIV. John G. Bartlett, M.D., is a professor of medicine in the Division of Infec- tious Diseases at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Prior to this role, he served as chief of the Infectious Diseases Division at the school for 26 years, stepping down in 2006. In addition, Dr. Bartlett has served as a faculty member at the University of California–Los Angeles (UCLA) and Tufts University School of Medicine. He was associate chief of staff for research at the Boston VA Hospital. Dr. Bartlett is a member of the IOM, master of the American College of Physicians, past president of the IDSA, and recipient of the Kass Award from the IDSA. In 2005, Dr. Bartlett was awarded the Alexander Fleming Award by the IDSA and the Finland Award from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Dr. Bartlett received his undergraduate degree at Dartmouth College and his M.D. at Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, New York. He trained in internal medi- cine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston and the University of Alabama–Birmingham, and he completed his fellowship training in infec- tious diseases at UCLA. Carlos del Rio, M.D., is professor and chair of the Hubert Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and professor of medi- cine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is also codirector for Clinical Science and International Research of the Emory Center for AIDS Research. He has held numerous leadership roles, including executive director of the National AIDS Council of Mexico, the federal agency of the Mexican government responsible for AIDS policy in that country; program director and principal investigator of the Emory AIDS International Training and Research Program; member of the CDC/Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Com- mittee on HIV/Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Treatment; and member of the Board of the International AIDS Society USA and the HIV Medical Association of the IDSA. Dr. del Rio is associate editor of AIDS Clinical Care and AIDS Research and Human Retroiruses and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of AIDS; Women, Children

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 APPENDIX E and HIV; and Global Public Health. He has coauthored 5 books, 30 book chapters, and more than 150 scientific papers. Patricia M. Flynn, M.D., is the Arthur Ashe chair in pediatric AIDS re- search and director of clinical research in the infectious disease department at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Dr. Flynn’s research interests include infections in immunocompromised hosts, HIV/AIDS, and epide- miology. She has been an investigator on several AIDS clinical trials. She has authored numerous publications and abstracts. Dr. Flynn received her undergraduate degree at Rhodes College; her master’s in epidemiology from the University of Tennessee, and her medical degree from Louisiana State University Medical Center. Larry M. Gant, L.M.S.W., Ph.D., is a professor of social work at the Uni- versity of Michigan. Dr. Gant’s research has focused on studying health- related physiological and psychosocial outcomes of structural, social, and individual factors leading to health disparities in urban communities nation- ally and globally. An HIV/AIDS outreach worker, case management consul- tant, and clinical consultant during the first two decades of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Dr. Gant’s research has focused on the creation, implementation, and evaluation of urban, community-based health prevention initiatives in the areas of substance abuse prevention, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV/AIDS among African-American heterosexual populations. His current work involves comparative analysis of HIV behavioral outreach interven- tions in mainland and interior China, Sub-Saharan Africa, and the United States. Dr. Gant has contributed to numerous scholarly publications and is principal investigator or coinvestigator in several National Institutes of Health (NIH), CDC, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration grants, including R01s from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to conduct clinical trials of an HIV prevention program with urban drug-dependent men, and the National Institute on Mental Health (NIMH) for a citywide demographic analysis and prospective study of eco- logic stressors, posttraumatic stress disorder, and drug use in urban areas. Dr. Gant earned his bachelor’s from the University of Notre Dame and his master’s and doctorate in psychology and social work from the University of Michigan. Igor Grant, M.D., is a distinguished professor of psychiatry and director of HIV neurobehavioral research programs at the University of California–San Diego. Dr. Grant’s academic interests focus on the effects of various dis- eases on brain and behavior, with an emphasis on translational studies in HIV, and drugs of abuse. Dr. Grant has contributed to approximately 500 scholarly publications and is principal investigator of several NIH studies,

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 HIV AND DISABILITY including a NIDA P50 (Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center, or TMARC) and the NIMH-funded HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, California NeuroAIDS Tissue Network, and Central Nervous Sys- tem HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER). Dr. Grant is a neuropsychiatrist who graduated from the University of British Co- lumbia School of Medicine. He received specialty training in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, and additional training in Neurology at the Institute of Neurology (Queen Square), London, United Kingdom. H. Clifford Lane, M.D., is the clinical director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the NIH. His areas of interest include the study of the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection. He has received the Commendation Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Outstand- ing Service Medal, and Distinguished Service Medal from the U.S. Public Health Service; the NIH Director’s Award; and the Chevalier du’ Mali from the President of Mali. He is also a member of the IOM and several other professional societies. Dr. Lane received his B.S. in chemistry and his M.D. from the University of Michigan. He is board-certified in internal medicine, infectious diseases, and diagnostic and clinical laboratory immunology. Celia Maxwell, M.D., is assistant vice president for Health Sciences and di- rector of the Women’s Health Institute at Howard University. She has been appointed to several national boards and committees, including serving as a member of the Healthcare Reform Task Force chaired by then-First Lady, Hillary Rodham Clinton, and the Office of the AIDS Advisory Council at the NIH. She was selected for the nationally renowned Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship and served as a health legislative assistant for Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA). Dr. Maxwell obtained her B.S. in nursing from Hunter College and her M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She completed her residency training in internal medicine at Howard University Hospital and completed her fellowship in infectious diseases/tropical medicine at the NIH and Howard University. Heidi Nass, J.D., is director of Treatment Education and Community Ad- vocacy at the University of Wisconsin Hospital’s HIV/AIDS Comprehensive Care Program. Ms. Nass has published dozens of articles, pamphlets, and newsletters. She is the founder of southern Wisconsin’s only AIDS legal ser- vices program, and served as managing editor of Wisconsin Women’s Law Journal. Ms. Nass consults with the UNAIDS on issues related to women and clinical HIV research and serves on a panel that is reviewing guide- lines for biomedical HIV prevention trials. She has also been a community representative in the NIH Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group. She is widely recognized as a national leader in HIV/AIDS activism.

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 APPENDIX E Ira Shoulson, M.D., is the Louis C. Lasagna Professor of Experimental Therapeutics and professor of Neurology, Pharmacology, and Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He founded the Parkinson Study Group in 1985 and the Huntington Study Group in 1994. He is considered a pioneer in research methods that have led to new treatments for Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other neuro- degenerative diseases. Dr. Shoulson has authored more than 270 scientific reports and is associate editor of Archies of Neurology. In addition, he is a former member of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council, and past president of the American Society for Experimen- tal NeuroTherapeutics. Dr. Shoulson is an elected member of the IOM. He earned his bachelor’s from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Ann Williams, Ed.D., R.N.C., FAAN, is currently professor of Nursing at UCLA, where she is also associate dean for Research. A certified family nurse practitioner, Dr. Williams has worked for more than two decades caring for persons living with HIV/AIDS. She designed and conducted some of the earliest studies of AIDS among drug users. Her work tested interven- tions to decrease HIV transmission, improve gynecologic care of women living with HIV, and increase patient adherence to antiretroviral medica- tion. She led the Connecticut AIDS Education and Training Center for two decades. Her current research examines the prevalence and incidence of combination antiretroviral therapy resistance and seeks to evaluate an intervention to improve medication adherence among drug users in south central China. Dr. Williams, an accomplished author and researcher, has been honored many times for her work. Dr. Williams earned a degree in history from Roosevelt University, an M.S. in nursing from Yale School of Nursing, and a doctorate in adult education from Columbia University. She completed her postdoctoral studies in HIV/AIDS research at UCSF. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Samantha M. Chao, M.P.H., is a program officer at the IOM, where she has primarily worked on issues such as health care quality, continuing education, and integrative medicine. She directed the Forum on the Science of Health Care Quality Improvement and Implementation, which brought together leaders in the field to discuss methods to improve the quality and value of health care through the strengthening of research. She previously staffed the Pathways to Quality Health Care Series, which reviewed perfor- mance measures to analyze health care delivery, evaluated Medicare’s Qual- ity Improvement Organization Program, and assessed pay for performance and its potential role in Medicare. Prior to joining the IOM, she completed

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0 HIV AND DISABILITY an M.P.H. in health policy with a concentration in management at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. As part of her studies, she interned with the American Heart Association. Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, M.D., M.P.H., spent 30 years as a commis- sioned officer in the U.S. Army Medical Department. He had a variety of assignments, including Chief of the Preventive Medicine Services at Fitzsi- mons Army Medical Center, Frankfurt Army Medical Center in Germany, and Madigan Army Medical Center. He also served as division surgeon for the Second Infantry Division and as chief of the Preventive Medicine Con- sultant’s Division in the Surgeon General’s Office. Dr. Erdtmann served as Commander of Evans Army Community Hospital from 1995 to 1997. He was the deputy chief of staff for Clinical Operations within the Department of Defense’s TRICARE Region 1, prior to assuming Hospital Command at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in 1998. Following that he was as- signed to the Office of the Surgeon General as the deputy assistant surgeon general for Force Development. Following military retirement in 2001, Dr. Erdtmann joined the IOM. He currently serves as director of the Medical Follow-up Agency and of the Board on the Health of Select Populations (formerly the Board on Military and Veterans Health). Dr. Erdtmann is a graduate of Bucknell University, where he received a B.S. in biology. He earned an M.P.H. from the University of California–Berkeley. He attended Temple University School of Medicine, where he earned his M.D. He is board certified in preventive medicine. Susan R. McCutchen, M.A., is a senior program associate for the IOM Board on the Health of Select Populations. She has been on staff at The National Academies for nearly 30 years and has worked in several insti- tutional divisions and with many different boards, committees, and panels within those units. The studies in which she has participated have addressed a broad range of subjects and focused on a variety of issues related to science and technology for international development, technology trans- fer, aeronautics and the U.S. space program, natural disaster mitigation, U.S. education policy and science curriculums, needle exchange for the prevention of HIV transmission, the scientific merit of the polygraph, hu- man factors/engineering, research ethics, disability compensation programs, health hazard evaluation, and medical and public health preparedness for catastrophic events, including nuclear detonations. She has assisted in the production of more than 50 publications and was an editor for A st Cen- tury System for Ealuating Veterans for Disability Benefits and Assessing Medical Preparedness to Respond to a Terrorist Nuclear Eent: Workshop Report. Ms. McCutchen has a B.A. in French, with minors in Italian and

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 APPENDIX E Spanish, from Ohio’s Miami University, and an M.A. in French, with a minor in English, from Kent State University. Joi D. Washington, B.S., is a senior program assistant for the IOM Board on the Health of Select Populations. Prior to joining the IOM in 2008, Ms. Washington held the position of registrar at the National Minority AIDS Council, for which she oversaw the registration process for two large national conferences. Ms. Washington received her B.S. in public and community health from the University of Maryland–College Park. She is currently pursuing a dual master’s degree in health care administration and business administration from the University of Maryland–University College. Erin E. Wilhelm, M.P.H., is a research associate with the IOM Board on the Health of Select Populations, serving both the Committee on Social Security HIV Disability Criteria and the Committee on Social Security Car- diovascular Disability Criteria. She is a health policy researcher and writer with experience in global health, nutrition, flood disasters and their impact on mental health, and disability issues. Prior to joining the IOM and The National Academies in 2009, Ms. Wilhelm served as a guest researcher at Fogarty International Center of the NIH, where she contributed to a litera- ture review and portfolio analysis for the Trans-NIH Working Group on Climate Change and Health. Among other roles, she has served as a publi- cations editor for the Corporate Executive Board, a best practice research firm in Washington, DC, and a staff writer for the St. Petersburg Times in Florida. Ms. Wilhelm holds an M.P.H. in global health from The George Washington University and a dual Bachelor of Arts in broadcast journalism and political science from the University of South Florida.

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