B
Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

RONALD M. SEGA, Chair, is the Woodward Professor of Systems Engineering at Colorado State University and the vice president for energy, environment, and applied research with Colorado State University Research Foundation. Dr. Sega was a faculty member in the College of Engineering and Applied Science at Colorado University at Colorado Springs, also serving as dean from 1996 to 2001. He served as technical director of the Laser and Aerospace Mechanics Directorate at F.J. Seiler Research Laboratory at the U.S. Air Force Academy and as assistant director of the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center at University of Houston. He served as director of defense research and engineering, the chief technology officer for the Department of Defense, from 2001 to 2005. He retired from the Air Force Reserve in 2005 as a major general in the position of reserve assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff after 31 years in the Air Force, having served in various assignments at Air Force Space Command and as a pilot. He most recently was the undersecretary of the Air Force from 2005 to 2007. A former astronaut, he flew aboard space shuttles Discovery (1994) and Atlantis (1996). He also led the Air Force team that won the overall Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management for 2006. Dr. Sega holds a B.S. in math and physics from the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, an M.S. in physics from the Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado.


VASSILIS ANGELOPOULOS is professor of Earth and space sciences and a member of the Institute of Geophysics and Space Physics at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has 15 years of experience in space physics with emphasis in magnetospheric processes. His research interests include plasma sheet transport, electromagnetic instabilities in the plasma sheet and its boundary, beam-induced ionospheric low-frequency waves, substorm physics, turbulence, and self-organized criticality. Dr. Angelopoulos is also a member of the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, and a distinguished visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has authored and coauthored more than 100 publications in refereed journals on data analysis, plasma theory and space plasma phenomenology, space technology, space instrumentation, and mission analysis and design. He has been awarded the Macelwane Medal by the American Geophysical Union in recognition of significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by young scientists and the Zeldovich Medal by the Russian Academy of Sciences and COSPAR on young scientists for excellence and achievement. He served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Solar and Space Physics between 2002 and 2005.



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B Biographies of Committee Members and Staff RONALD M. SEGA, Chair, is the Woodward Professor of Systems Engineering at Colorado State University and the vice president for energy, environment, and applied research with Colorado State University Research Founda - tion. Dr. Sega was a faculty member in the College of Engineering and Applied Science at Colorado University at Colorado Springs, also serving as dean from 1996 to 2001. He served as technical director of the Laser and Aerospace Mechanics Directorate at F.J. Seiler Research Laboratory at the U.S. Air Force Academy and as assistant director of the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center at University of Houston. He served as director of defense research and engineering, the chief technology officer for the Department of Defense, from 2001 to 2005. He retired from the Air Force Reserve in 2005 as a major general in the position of reserve assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff after 31 years in the Air Force, having served in various assignments at Air Force Space Command and as a pilot. He most recently was the undersecretary of the Air Force from 2005 to 2007. A former astronaut, he flew aboard space shuttles Discovery (1994) and Atlantis (1996). He also led the Air Force team that won the overall Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management for 2006. Dr. Sega holds a B.S. in math and physics from the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, an M.S. in physics from the Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado. VASSILIS ANGELOPOULOS is professor of Earth and space sciences and a member of the Institute of Geophysics and Space Physics at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has 15 years of experience in space physics with emphasis in magnetospheric processes. His research interests include plasma sheet transport, electromagnetic insta- bilities in the plasma sheet and its boundary, beam-induced ionospheric low-frequency waves, substorm physics, turbulence, and self-organized criticality. Dr. Angelopoulos is also a member of the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, and a distinguished visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has authored and coauthored more than 100 publications in refereed journals on data analysis, plasma theory and space plasma phenomenology, space technology, space instrumentation, and mission analysis and design. He has been awarded the Macelwane Medal by the American Geophysical Union in recognition of significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by young scientists and the Zeldovich Medal by the Russian Academy of Sciences and COSPAR on young scientists for excellence and achievement. He served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Solar and Space Physics between 2002 and 2005. 

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 CONTROLLING COST GROWTH OF NASA EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE MISSIONS ALLAN V. BURMAN is president of Jefferson Solutions, a division of the Jefferson Consulting Group, LLC, a firm that provides change management services and acquisition reform training to many federal departments and agencies. Dr. Burman provides strategic consulting services to private sector firms doing business with the federal government as well as to federal agencies and other government entities. He also has advised firms, congressional committees, and federal and state agencies on a variety of management and acquisition reform matters. Prior to joining the Jefferson Consulting Group, Dr. Burman had a long career in the federal government, including serving as administrator for federal procurement policy in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), where he testified before Congress over 40 times on management, acquisition, and budget matters. Dr. Burman authored the 1991 policy letter that established performance-based contracting and greater reliance, where appropriate, on fixed-price contracting as the favored approach for contract reform. As a member of the Senior Executive Service, Dr. Burman served as chief of the Air Force Branch in OMB’s National Security Division and was the first OMB branch chief to receive a Presidential Rank Award. Dr. Burman is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, a fellow and member of the Executive Advisory Council of the National Contract Management Association, a direc - tor of the Procurement Round Table, and an honorary member of the National Defense Industrial Association. He is also a former contributing editor and writer for Government Executive magazine. Dr. Burman obtained a B.A. from Wesleyan University, was a Fulbright Scholar at the Institute of Political Studies, University of Bordeaux, France, and has a graduate degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from the George Washington University. Dr. Burman has been a member of four prior NRC study committees, most recently the Committee on Optimizing U.S. Air Force and Department of Defense Review of Air Force Acquisition Programs. OLIVIER L. de WECK is the associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems and the associate director of the Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Before joining MIT he was a liaison engineer and later engineering program manager on the F/A-18 aircraft program at McDonnell Douglas. His research interests, teaching emphasis, and professional experience include systems engineering for changeability and commonality and space exploration logistics. His research is helping to establish principles, methods, and tools to plan, simulate, and visualize the future as an interplanetary supply chain. In such a supply chain, innovative strategies (pre-positioning, carry-along, resupply, and orbital depots) are carefully matched with new technologies (space tugs, reconfigurable spares, and RFID-enabled asset management) to maximize sci - entific exploration, while minimizing the cost and risk of future exploration campaigns. He has written or cowritten more than 100 journal and conference publications in the area of systems engineering and space systems design for exploration and communications. His changeability research traces the evolution and change over time of existing technical systems, formalizes patterns of change propagation, and develops methods and tools for finding where and how to embed flexibility in design and how to value such flexibility. His commonality research investigates another strategic aspect in engineering design where systems and products are no longer designed as individuals, but the need for customization and efficiency drives considerations of commonality, reuse, and platform architectures. Dr. de Weck is an associate fellow of AIAA, winner of the 2006 Frank E. Perkins award for excellence in gradu - ate advising, and recipient of the 2007 AIAA MDO TC outstanding service award. He has a degree in industrial engineering from ETH Zurich, Switzerland, and a Ph.D. in aerospace systems engineering from MIT. ROBERT E. DEEMER is an assistant professor at Regis University. He has been teaching for the last 7 years in business and emerging technologies after 28 years in industry with Litton Industries and Lockheed Martin. He has been involved from an operations management perspective on several space exploration programs, including the Mars Lander, Stardust, and Cassini. He also spent several years at the Advanced Spacecraft Technology Center as operations director while working for Lockheed Martin in Denver, Colorado. He has an M.S. in computer science from Colorado Technical College, an M.B.A. from Pepperdine University, an M.S. in management science from the University of Redlands, and an M.A. in philosophy and humanities from California State University; he has three B.S. and four B.A. degrees in various fields, and he is a professionally certified project manager through Villanova University. He has chaired two NRC study committees, including the Committee to Review NASA’s Space Communications Program, and served as a member of two others. He is a national associate of the National Academies.

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 APPENDIX B LARRY W. ESPOSITO is a professor at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is the principal investigator of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph experiment on the Cassini space mission to Saturn. He was chair of the Voyager Rings Working Group and, as a member of the Pioneer Saturn Imaging Team, he discovered Saturn’s F ring. His research focuses on the nature and history of planetary rings. Dr. Esposito has been a participant in numerous American, Russian, and European space missions and used the Hubble Space Telescope for its first observations of Venus. He was awarded the Harold C. Urey Prize from the American Astronomical Society, the Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement from NASA, and the Richtmyer Lecture Award from the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Physical Society. Dr. Esposito has chaired two NRC committees, including the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, and he served as a member of six others, as well as the Space Studies Board. Dr. Esposito has an S.B. in mathematics from MIT and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. JOSEPH FULLER, JR. is the founder, president, and CEO of Futron Corporation, a leader in providing decision management solutions to aerospace, telecommunications, and other technology enterprises. Before founding Futron, Mr. Fuller spent 20 years at NASA as an aerospace systems engineer, project manager, and senior execu - tive. He is experienced in the design, development, and operations of both human-piloted and robotic spacecraft. Mr. Fuller is a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and a former member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the NRC. He currently serves on NOAA’s Advisory Committee on Commercial Remote Sensing, NASA’s Project Management (APPEL) Mission Operations Working Group, and on the board of the Challenger Center for Science Education. He has a B.S. in physics from Texas Southern University and an M.B.A. from the University of Houston. He was a member of the NRC Committee that produced NASA’s Beyond Einstein Program: An Architecture for Implementation (2007). JOSEPH W. HAMAKER is a senior cost analyst with Science Applications International Corporation. He performs cost and schedule estimating, risk/uncertainty analysis and related economic assessments, cost-estimating tool development, and related work for new and ongoing space projects. Previously, Dr. Hamaker was the director of the Cost Analysis Division of NASA headquarters. In this position, Dr. Hamaker led the development of indepen - dent cost estimates for NASA programs, as well as the establishment of strategic management and policy for the overall NASA cost-estimating process. Prior to assuming the lead cost position at NASA headquarters in September 2002, he spent 29 years at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, the last 16 as manager of the Engineering Cost Office there. Dr. Hamaker has a B.S. in industrial engineering from Tennessee Technological University and three degrees from the University of Alabama, Huntsville: a B.A. in economics, an M.S. in engineering management, and a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering. He is a Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis certified cost analyst and an International Society of Parametric Analysts certified parametric practitioner. He has supported two NRC studies, including the Review of Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies. VICTORIA E. HAMILTON is a principal scientist at the Southwest Research Institute. Formerly, she was an associate researcher in the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at the University of Hawaii. She is a planetary geologist interested in the mineralogy and igneous processes/histories of planetary bodies. The main focus of her research is investigating the spectral features of minerals and rocks in the thermal infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and using this knowledge to identify and/or characterize the rocks and minerals on planetary surfaces. Most of her recent work has focused on analysis of data from ongoing NASA spacecraft missions at Mars. She has served as a panel chair, NASA Mars Fundamental Research Program Review Panel (2007), and panel chair, NASA Mars Data Analysis Program Review Panel (2008). Dr. Hamilton is on the editorial board of the journal Minerals; she is a science team member and deputy instrument scientist on the OSIRIS-REx New Frontiers mission; she is a participating scientist on the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission; she served as a member of the Uni - versities Space Research Association Lunar and Planetary Institute Science Council; she served as associate editor of JGR-Planets; and she was a member of the NASA Advisory Council Planetary Science Subcommittee (2006 to 2009). Dr. Hamilton has a B.A. in geology from Occidental College and a Ph.D. in geology from Arizona State University. She was a member of the NRC Committee for the Review of the Next Decade Mars Architecture.

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 CONTROLLING COST GROWTH OF NASA EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE MISSIONS JOHN M. KLINEBERG is an aerospace consultant, the former CEO of Swales Aerospace, and the retired president of Space Systems/Loral (SS/L). Before assuming the presidency of SS/L, Dr. Klineberg served as executive vice president for Loral’s Globalstar program where he successfully led the development, production, and deployment of the Globalstar satellite constellation used for telephone services. Prior to joining Loral in 1995, Dr. Klineberg spent 25 years at NASA where he served in a variety of management and technical positions. He was the director of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), director of the Lewis (now Glenn) Research Center, deputy associate administrator for Aeronautics and Space Technology at NASA headquarters, and a research scientist at the Ames Research Center. Before beginning his career at NASA, he conducted fundamental studies in fluid dynamics at the California Institute of Technology and worked at the Douglas Aircraft Company and the Grumman Aircraft Company. Dr. Klineberg has a B.S. in engineering from Princeton University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. He is the former chair of two NRC study committees, including the Committee to Review the NASA Astrobiology Institute, a former member of one other committee, and a former member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. BRUCE D. MARCUS is retired from TRW Inc., where he was chief scientist and manager of advanced programs for the Space and Laser Programs Division. Dr. Marcus’s professional interests include Earth and space sciences. His research background includes heat and mass transfer, heat pipes, thermosiphons, spacecraft thermal control, and thermo-mechanical design of telescopes. Dr. Marcus has investigated technology issues related to the potential use of the NPOESS weather satellite for climate research, and his background also includes extensive experience in space systems program management. Dr. Marcus has a BME in thermal processes, an MME in nuclear and thermal engineering, and a Ph.D. in thermal processes, mathematics, and engineering physics, all from Cornell University. He was on the committee that authored the NRC report The Role of Small Satellites in NASA and NOAA Earth Observation Programs; he has served on six other NRC study committeesp; he is a former member of the Space Studies Board; and he has been designated a national associate of the National Academies. EMERY I. REEVES is an independent consultant. He is the retired Schriever Chair Professor of Space Systems Engineering at the U.S. Air Force Academy. In 1985, he retired from TRW as vice president and general manager of the Spacecraft Engineering Division. He was a naval officer from 1955 to 1958. He has also served as a con - sulting professor at Stanford University from 1985 to 1992. Mr. Reeves was elected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering for pioneering contributions to the design and development of spacecraft and ballistic missile attitude-control and navigation systems. He has a B.E. from Yale University and an M.S.E.E. from MIT. He served on the NRC Panel on Critical Materials-Phase I of the Committee on Critical Materials and more recently on the NAE Aerospace Engineering Peer Committee. WILLIAM F. TOWNSEND is an independent aerospace consultant. Previously, he was with the Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation as vice president, exploration systems, and as vice president and general manager of the Civil Space Systems strategic business unit. Mr. Townsend also has more than 40 years of experience in program and project management with NASA, from aircraft and spacecraft instrument development to international space mission development. As deputy center director and chair of the program management council at GSFC from 1998 to 2004, Mr. Townsend oversaw the development, launch, and operation of all GSFC instruments, spacecraft, and missions. Mr. Townsend also spent 17 years in the Earth Science Enterprise area at NASA headquarters, culminating with almost 2 years as the acting associate administrator. Honors and awards received by Mr. Townsend include two Presidential Rank Meritorious Executive awards; two NASA Distinguished Service Medals; the NASA Out - standing Leadership Medal; the NASA Exceptional Service Medal; the French space agency’s (CNES’s) Bronze Medal; and the NASA GSFC’s Robert C. Baumann Memorial Award for Mission Success. He has a B.S.E.E. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

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 APPENDIX B Staff ALAN C. ANGLEMAN, Study Director, has been a senior program officer for the Aeronautics and Space Engineer- ing Board (ASEB) since 1993, directing studies on a wide variety of aerospace issues. Previously, Mr. Angleman worked for consulting firms in the Washington, D.C., area, providing engineering support services to the Depart - ment of Defense and NASA headquarters. His professional career began with the U.S. Navy, where he served for 9 years as a nuclear-trained submarine officer. He has a B.S. in engineering physics from the U.S. Naval Academy and an M.S. in applied physics from the Johns Hopkins University. CATHERINE A. GRUBER, editor, joined the Space Studies Board (SSB) as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Sci - ence and Telecommunications Board and also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. ANDREA M. REBHOLZ, program associate, joined the ASEB in January 2009. She began her career at the National Academies in October 2005 as a senior program assistant for the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation. Prior to the Academies, she worked in the communications department of a D.C.-based think tank. Ms. Rebholz graduated from George Mason University’s New Century College in 2003 with a B.A. in integrative studies–event management and has more than 8 years of experience in event planning. LINDA WALKER, senior project assistant, has been with the National Academies since September 2007. Before her assignment with the SSB, she was on assignment with the National Academies Press. Prior to her working at the National Academies, she was with the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy in Falls Church, Virginia. Ms. Walker has 28 years of administrative experience. MICHAEL H. MOLONEY is the director of the SSB and the ASEB at the NRC. Since joining the NRC in 2001, Dr. Moloney has served as a study director at the National Materials Advisory Board, the Board on Physics and Astronomy, the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design, and the Center for Economic, Governance, and International Studies. Before joining the SSB and ASEB in April 2010, he was associate director of the BPA and study director for the Astro2010 decadal survey for astronomy and astrophysics. In addition to his professional experience at the NRC, Dr. Moloney has more than 7 years experience as a foreign-service officer for the Irish government and served in that capacity at the Embassy of Ireland in Washington, D.C., the Mission of Ireland to the United Nations in New York, and the Department of Foreign Affairs in Dublin, Ireland. A physicist, Dr. Moloney did his graduate Ph.D. work at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland. He received his undergraduate degree in experimental physics at University College Dublin, where he was awarded the Nevin Medal for Physics.