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Workshop Agenda

Assessing the Human Health Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: An Institute of Medicine Workshop


June 22-23, 2010


Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom New Orleans, Louisiana


DAY 1 – TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

8:00 a.m.

Registration

8:30 a.m.

Welcome

Harvey V. Fineberg, President, Institute of Medicine

8:40 a.m.

Charge to the IOM

Nicole Lurie, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

8:50 a.m.

Introductory Remarks

Nancy E. Adler, Chair, Planning Committee and Director of the Center for Health and Community, University of California, San Francisco



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C Workshop Agenda Assessing the Human Health Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: An Institute of Medicine Workshop June 22-23, 2010 Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom New Orleans, Louisiana DAY 1 – TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010 8:00 a.m. Registration 8:30 a.m. Welcome Harvey V. Fineberg, President, Institute of Medicine 8:40 a.m. Charge to the IOM Nicole Lurie, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 8:50 a.m. Introductory Remarks Nancy E. Adler, Chair, Planning Committee and Director of the Center for Health and Community, University of California, San Francisco 149

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150 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL 9:00 a.m. The Compelling Need to Understand the Effects of Oil Spills on Human Health Bernard D. Goldstein, University of Pittsburgh Blanca Laffon, University of A Coruña Edward B. Overton, Louisiana State University 9:45 a.m. The Response of the Federal Government to Health Concerns John Howard, Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention SESSION I: AT-RISK POPULATIONS AND ROUTES OF EXPOSURE Session Objective: Identify and discuss the populations (e.g., fishermen and -women, clean-up workers, and residents of the affected communi- ties) that are most vulnerable to, or at increased risks for, adverse health effects related to the oil spill. Examine potential routes of exposure in select populations. Explore special considerations in the development and implementation of population-monitoring activities. 10:00 a.m. Panel Discussion. Taking Stock: Who Is at Risk and How Are They Exposed? Moderator: Linda Rosenstock, University of California, Los Angeles Routes of Exposure and At-Risk Populations Paul J. Lioy, Rutgers University Residents of Affected Regions: General and Special Populations Maureen Y. Lichtveld, Tulane University Occupational Risks and Health Hazards: Workers and Volunteers Scott Barnhart, University of Washington

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151 APPENDIX C SESSION II: SHORT- AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH Session Objective: Identify and explore potential short- and long-term effects on human health from the oil spill. Particular attention will be placed on potential physical effects, psychological stress, heat stress and fatigue, and neurological and carcinogenic outcomes. Examine potential health effects on children and pregnant women. Consider monitoring strategies and data tools that should be used to assess potential health effects. 11:10 a.m. Panel Discussion. The Here and Now: What Are the Short-Term Effects on Human Health? Moderator: Linda A. McCauley, Emory University Short-Term Physical Effects Nalini Sathiakumar, University of Alabama at Birmingham Short-Term Psychological Stress Howard J. Osofsky, Louisiana State University Heat Stress and Fatigue Thomas E. Bernard, University of South Florida 12:20 p.m. LUNCH 1:30 p.m. Panel Discussion. The Need to Know: What Are the Potential Delayed and Long-Term Effects on Human Health? Moderator: Kenneth Olden, Hunter College of the City University of New York Neurological, Cancer, and Other Chronic Conditions Peter S. Spencer, Oregon Health and Science University Human Reproduction Brenda Eskenazi, University of California, Berkeley

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152 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL Impact on Health and Vulnerabilities of Children Irwin Redlener, National Commission on Children and Disasters Stress Sheldon Cohen, Carnegie Mellon University Lessons Learned from Previous Oil Spills Lawrence A. Palinkas, University of Southern California SESSION III: STRATEGIES FOR COMMUNICATING RISK Session Objective: Explore how to identify and address the health concerns of affected individuals and groups and of the public at large. Explore effective communication strategies to convey information about health risks accounting for culture, health literacy, language, and technological and geographic barriers. Consider specific strategies to engage selective at-risk populations. Engage the public in a dialogue about the populations most at risk and how to establish monitoring systems that will provide credible, reliable, and actionable data. 3:00 p.m. Engaging the Public, Protecting Health David Abramson, Columbia University 3:20 p.m. Dialogue with Workshop Participants Moderator: Mike Magee, Healthy-Waters.org Brief Invited Remarks—Community Perspectives Myra M. Lewis Diem Nguyen Wilma Subra John Hosey Open Dialogue with Audience 4:20 p.m. Day 1 Closing Remarks Nancy E. Adler, University of California, San Francisco 4:30 p.m. ADJOURN

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153 APPENDIX C DAY 2 – WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2010 8:30 a.m. Registration 9:00 a.m. Recap of Day 1 Discussions and Overview of Day 2 Nancy E. Adler, University of California, San Francisco 9:10 a.m. Remarks from the Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service The Honorable Regina M. Benjamin SESSION IV: OVERVIEW OF HEALTH-MONITORING ACTIVITIES Session Objective: Explore monitoring activities already being organ- ized by state governments in relation to the spill. Identify and discuss opportunities and barriers to ensure coordination among ongoing efforts and strategies to minimize redundancy. Consider resource requirements to ensure that data collected informs policies for appropriate preventive strategies and delivery of health care services. 9:20 a.m. Panel Discussion. How Are State Governments Currently Monitoring the Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill on Human Health? Moderator: LuAnn E. White, Tulane University Jimmy Guidry, Louisiana State Health Officer Mary Currier, Mississippi State Health Officer Ana M. Viamonte Ros, Florida State Surgeon General Donald E. Williamson, Alabama State Health Officer Bruce Clements, Director of the Community Preparedness Section, Texas Department of State Health Services

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154 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL 10:20 a.m. Additional Federal Perspectives Mathy V. Stanislaus, Assistant Administrator, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Alexander G. Garza, Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs and Chief Medical Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security SESSION V: RESEARCH METHODOLOGIES AND DATA SOURCES Session Objective: Consider methodologies and available data sources (including ongoing health surveillance and surveys) that could be used to monitor effects of the oil spill. Identify characteristics of a framework that can most efficiently and effectively identify and monitor potential short- and long-term adverse health effects. Identify the components and needs to ensure the establishment of an integrated and coordinated health-monitoring system. 10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion. Critical Thinking: What Research Methodologies and Data Sources Could Be Used in Surveillance and Monitoring Activities? Moderator: John C. Bailar III, University of Chicago Overview of Research Methodologies and Data Collection Lynn R. Goldman, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Surveillance and Monitoring Thomas D. Matte, Hunter College of the City University of New York Environmental Assessment, Risk, and Health William H. Farland, Colorado State University Mental Health Howard J. Osofsky, Louisiana State University Biomedical Informatics and Registries Daniel R. Masys, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 12:20 p.m. LUNCH

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155 APPENDIX C SESSION VI: FUTURE DIRECTIONS AND RESOURCE NEEDS Session Objective: Identify and discuss overarching themes that emerged throughout the workshop. Identify significant gaps in our knowledge base. Discuss what opportunities and constraints exist to im- plementing the frameworks and models discussed throughout the workshop. Consider what resources are required to implement the changes necessary to ensure that the most efficient and effective frameworks are in place to identify and monitor potential short- and long- term adverse health effects. 1:30 p.m. Panel Discussion. Looking Ahead: How Do We Develop Effective Surveillance and Monitoring Systems? Moderator: David A. Savitz, Mount Sinai School of Medicine Nancy E. Adler, University of California, San Francisco John C. Bailar III, University of Chicago Lynn R. Goldman, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Maureen Y. Lichtveld, Tulane University Linda A. McCauley, Emory University Kenneth Olden, Hunter College of the City University of New York Linda Rosenstock, University of California, Los Angeles 3:20 p.m. Closing Remarks Nancy E. Adler, University of California, San Francisco 3:30 p.m. ADJOURN

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