FIGURE 4.10 Papers published in journals on the FFAR list (National Research Council, Federal Funding of Astronomical Research, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 2000), by field. Top: Papers in specific fields as a fraction of all papers published. Bottom: Absolute number of papers published. Fields were assigned by Bayesian classification on the basis of title, abstract, and keyword text extracted from the Astrophysical Data System. NOTE: PL, planetary and solar system; SO, solar; IM, interstellar medium and the galaxy; AG, active galactic nuclei; SF, star and planet formation; and IN, instrumentation. The reported fractions are annual averages.

FIGURE 4.10 Papers published in journals on the FFAR list (National Research Council, Federal Funding of Astronomical Research, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 2000), by field. Top: Papers in specific fields as a fraction of all papers published. Bottom: Absolute number of papers published. Fields were assigned by Bayesian classification on the basis of title, abstract, and keyword text extracted from the Astrophysical Data System. NOTE: PL, planetary and solar system; SO, solar; IM, interstellar medium and the galaxy; AG, active galactic nuclei; SF, star and planet formation; and IN, instrumentation. The reported fractions are annual averages.

bers), while the U.S. population at large has increased by only 30 percent over that period. The total number of professional astronomers is estimated to be even larger, around 9,000 based on the decadal survey’s own data gathering on demographics (Figure 4.11), since there are many more members of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the APS, and the Optical Society of America who work in subfields like extrasolar and solar system planetary science, cosmology, and instrumentation who are not members of the AAS.



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