FIGURE 5.6 Number of published papers using Hubble Space Telescope data, 1995 to 2008. The publications are divided into non-archival papers written by the original investigators (blue), fully archival publications not involving any of the original investigators (yellow), and papers, some archival and some not, that include data from multiple proposals (red). The number of archival papers has exceeded the number of original-investigator-written papers since 2006. SOURCE: Courtesy of Richard L. White, Space Telescope Science Institute.

FIGURE 5.6 Number of published papers using Hubble Space Telescope data, 1995 to 2008. The publications are divided into non-archival papers written by the original investigators (blue), fully archival publications not involving any of the original investigators (yellow), and papers, some archival and some not, that include data from multiple proposals (red). The number of archival papers has exceeded the number of original-investigator-written papers since 2006. SOURCE: Courtesy of Richard L. White, Space Telescope Science Institute.

sions, and a National Research Council report9 lauded their efficiency. This support now provides the major return on the considerable investments the agency has made in the Great Observatories and other facilities over the past 20 years. The 2007 report also found that the consolidation of archives at a small number of facilities is efficient, cost-effective, and serves the scientific community well.

9

The 2007 National Research Council report Portals to the Universe: The NASA Astronomy Science Centers (The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.) emphasizes the role of NASA archives in allowing astronomers to examine data on a particular target set across a range of wavelengths: “Not only are the archives the keepers of the raw observations, but they also provide direct access to calibrated versions of their data products, with online documentation and searchable databases linked to the literature. This ‘shrink-wrapped’ feature of modern archives makes it easier for astronomers to combine data across various subdisciplines, a task that would have been difficult even a few years ago when all astronomers had their own sets of tools and did most of the data reduction themselves” (p. 25).



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