FIGURE 5.9 The richness of the submillimeter spectrum for probing molecular chemistry in regions where stars are born, illustrated with SMA data. Note the number of lines that are at present unidentified (U). The promise of SMA, ALMA, and CCAT will be enhanced with additional laboratory astrophysics work. SOURCE: C.L. Brogan, T.R. Hunter, C.J. Cyganowski, R. Indebetouw, H. Beuther, K.M. Menten, and S. Thorwirth, Digging into NGC 6334 I(N): Multiwavelength imaging of a massive protostellar cluster, Astrophysical Journal 707:1-23, 2009. Reproduced by permission of AAS.

FIGURE 5.9 The richness of the submillimeter spectrum for probing molecular chemistry in regions where stars are born, illustrated with SMA data. Note the number of lines that are at present unidentified (“U”). The promise of SMA, ALMA, and CCAT will be enhanced with additional laboratory astrophysics work. SOURCE: C.L. Brogan, T.R. Hunter, C.J. Cyganowski, R. Indebetouw, H. Beuther, K.M. Menten, and S. Thorwirth, Digging into NGC 6334 I(N): Multiwavelength imaging of a massive protostellar cluster, Astrophysical Journal 707:1-23, 2009. Reproduced by permission of AAS.

in physics departments. At the same time, astronomy’s needs have expanded with the progression into new wavelength regimes and the rapid increase in measurement capabilities. For example, precision experiments on magnetized plasmas under astrophysical conditions are becoming available, as are high-energy-density experiments that make use of giant lasers and magnetic pinches to create relevant conditions for heating and shock propagation. In addition, it is possible to use these experiments to advance understanding of magnetic reconnection, which is of vital



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