FIGURE 7.2 Multiwavelength images of high-redshift source GOODS 850-5 showing the complementarity of multiwavelength data and the promise of a future GSMT/JWST/CCAT/ALMA combination for studies of early galaxies. SOURCE: W.-H. Wang, A.J. Barger, and L.L. Cowie, Ultradeep near-infrared observations of Goods 850-5, Astrophysical Journal 690:319, 2009. Reproduced by permission of AAS.

FIGURE 7.2 Multiwavelength images of high-redshift source GOODS 850-5 showing the complementarity of multiwavelength data and the promise of a future GSMT/JWST/CCAT/ALMA combination for studies of early galaxies. SOURCE: W.-H. Wang, A.J. Barger, and L.L. Cowie, Ultradeep near-infrared observations of Goods 850-5, Astrophysical Journal 690:319, 2009. Reproduced by permission of AAS.

Complementary studies of the young stars spawned in these molecular regions will require infrared surveys with high angular resolution both in our galaxy and in the neighboring galaxies the Magellanic Clouds, using JWST in space and GSMT equipped with adaptive optics on the ground.

Since solar flares create many cosmic rays that can cause mutations of genetic material, understanding these flares is important for understanding the chances of a planet being habitable. Flares on the more numerous low-mass, cool stars may preclude some forms of life on orbiting planets already known and to be discovered. Studying flares from the Sun using optical techniques with ATST—and at radio frequencies by using the proposed Mid-Scale Innovations Program candidate, the Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR)—as well as studying stellar flares in far-off planetary systems using the proposed IXO, could advance our understanding of planetary habitability.



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