FIGURE 7.11 CCAT is a 25-meter telescope located at 18,500 feet elevation close to ALMA in Chile. The mirror surface has active control. CCAT will operate from 0.3 to 1.4 millimeters (with a goal of 0.2 to 3.5 mm) with a 10- to 20-arcminute field of view and diffraction-limited angular resolution of 10 × (wavelength in millimeters) arcsecond. Highly sensitive bolometer arrays with more than 10,000 sensors using superconducting transition edge sensor technology are envisaged. The flux sensitivity is limited by source confusion to around 1 mJy. SOURCE: M3 Engineering/CCAT/Caltech.

FIGURE 7.11 CCAT is a 25-meter telescope located at 18,500 feet elevation close to ALMA in Chile. The mirror surface has active control. CCAT will operate from 0.3 to 1.4 millimeters (with a goal of 0.2 to 3.5 mm) with a 10- to 20-arcminute field of view and diffraction-limited angular resolution of 10 × (wavelength in millimeters) arcsecond. Highly sensitive bolometer arrays with more than 10,000 sensors using superconducting transition edge sensor technology are envisaged. The flux sensitivity is limited by source confusion to around 1 mJy. SOURCE: M3 Engineering/CCAT/Caltech.

CCAT is called out to progress promptly to the next step in its development because of its strong science case, its importance to ALMA, and its readiness.

Small Additions and Augmentations to NSF’s Core Research Program

As discussed in Chapters 5 and 6, several changes to NSF’s core research program in ground-based astronomy are recommended. Collected here is an unranked list of the five components for which increases in funding are deemed most needed. Programs that are not mentioned are assumed to proceed with existing budgets, subject to senior review recommendations, although the committee emphasizes the importance of many small elements of the core research programs described in Chapter 5.



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