FIGURE 4-4 Numbers of qualified applicants not accepted in ADN and BSN programs.

FIGURE 4-4 Numbers of qualified applicants not accepted in ADN and BSN programs.

NOTES:

1 Number of qualified applicants not accepted in baccalaureate generic RN programs, based on AACN data in Enrollment and Graduations in Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs in Nursing (2006-07, Table 37; 2007-08, Table 39; 2008-09, Table 38; 2009-2010, Table 39).

2 Number of qualified applicants not accepted in baccalaureate generic RN and RN-to-BSN programs, based on National League for Nursing data in Nursing Data Review (2004-05, Tables 3 & 6; 2005-06, Tables 2 & 5; 2007-08; Tables 2 & 5).

3 Number of qualified applicants not accepted in associate’s degree RN programs, based on National League for Nursing data in Nursing Data Review (2004-05, Tables 3 & 6; 2005-06, Tables 2 & 5; 2007-08; Tables 2 & 5).

The definition of “qualified” varies from nursing program to nursing program and is based on each program’s admission requirements and completion standards at the schools that were surveyed.

SOURCE: RWJF, 2010b. Reprinted with permission from Lori Melichar, RWJF.

Age is also a contributing factor to faculty shortages. Nursing faculty tend to be older than clinical nurses because they must meet requirements for an advanced degree in order to teach. Figure 4-5 shows that the average age of nurses who work as faculty as their principal nursing position—the position in which a nurse spends the majority of his or her working hours6—is 50 to 54. By contrast, the median age of the total RN workforce is 46. More than 19 percent of RNs whose principal position is faculty are aged 60 or older, while only 8.7 percent

6

Personal communication, Joanne Spetz, Professor, Community Health Systems, University of California, San Francisco, September 2, 2010.



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