ing bottlenecks. To this end, market-based salary adjustments must be made for faculty, and more scholarships must be provided to help nursing students advance their education. Accrediting and certifying organizations must mandate demonstrated mastery of clinical skills, managerial competencies, and professional development at all levels. Mandated skills, competencies, and professional development milestones must be updated on a more timely basis to keep pace with the rapidly changing demands of health care. All health professionals should receive more of their education in concert with students from other disciplines. Efforts also must be made to increase the diversity of the nursing workforce.

The nursing profession must adopt a framework of continuous lifelong learning that includes basic education, academic progression, and continuing competencies. More nurses must receive a solid education in how to manage complex conditions and coordinate care with multiple health professionals. They must demonstrate new competencies in systems thinking, quality improvement, and care management and a basic understanding of health care policy. Graduate-level nurses must develop an even deeper understanding of care coordination, quality improvement, systems thinking, and policy.

The committee emphasizes further that, as discussed in Chapter 2, the ACA is likely to accelerate the shift in care from the hospital to the community setting. This transition will have a particularly strong impact on nurses, more than 60 percent of whom are currently employed in hospitals (HRSA, 2010b). Nurses may turn to already available positions in primary or chronic care or in public or community health, or they may pursue entirely new careers in emerging fields that they help create. Continuing and graduate education programs must support the transition to a future that rewards flexibility. In addition, the curriculum at many nursing schools, which places heavy emphasis on preparing students for employment in the acute care setting, will need to be rethought (Benner et al., 2009).

REFERENCES

AACN (American Association of Colleges of Nursing). 2005. Enrollment and graduations in baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing, 2004-05. Washington, DC: AACN.

AACN. 2006. Enrollment and graduations in baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing, 2005-06. Washington, DC: AACN.

AACN. 2007. Enrollment and graduations in baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing, 2006-07. Washington, DC: AACN.

AACN. 2008a. Enrollment and graduations in baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing, 2007-08. Washington, DC: AACN.

AACN. 2008b. The essentials of baccalaureate education for professional nursing practice. Washington, DC: AACN. Available from http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education/pdf/BaccEssentials08.pdf.

AACN. 2009a. Advancing higher education in nursing: 2009 annual report. Washington, DC: AACN.



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