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lence of inadequacy. Nonetheless, it is desirable to set nutrient targets for CACFP meals and snacks to provide a scientific basis for the Meal Requirements and also to serve as a model for the meals and snacks served in other child and adult care settings. Even if only an afterschool snack is served by CACFP, the types and amounts of the foods may promote the desire for, and acceptance of, a higher quality diet throughout the rest of the day.

Considering the Tolerable Upper Intake Level in Setting Nutrient Targets

The committee examined the possibility that, for some nutrients, the prevalence of intakes above the UL would be undesirably high if the CACFP TMIs were achieved for the full day’s intake. Using NHANES (2003–2004) data, an adjusted intake at the 95th percentile was calculated assuming that the median intake of a nutrient changed to be equal to the CACFP TMI and that the whole distribution (including the 95th percentile) would change by the same amount. For these analyses, intakes of 5–10-year-olds were not combined with those of 11–13-year-olds, nor were intakes of younger (19–59 years) and older (> 60 years) adults; calculations were performed separately for males and females within each age group. This same method was used for nutrients with an EAR and for nutrients with an AI.

For each age group, the adjusted intake at the 95th percentile was compared to the UL, if any. (Magnesium was excluded because the UL is only for pharmacological agents. The UL does not apply to magnesium in foods [IOM, 1997].) For children ages 5–10 years, the UL for the younger DRI age group (6–8 years)—the most conservative value—was used. For several nutrients, the ULs are considerably lower for children ages 8 years or younger than for older children.

The results are shown in Tables 6-6 and 6-7. For each age group, there were some nutrients with the adjusted 95th percentile of intakes above the UL, meaning that at least 5 percent of CACFP participants would have intakes above the UL if the median intake was at the CACFP TMI, as follows:

  • 1-year-olds: vitamin A, niacin, folate, zinc, and sodium

  • 2–4-year-olds: vitamin A, niacin, folate, zinc, and sodium

  • 5–10-year-olds: vitamin A, niacin, folate, zinc, and sodium for males and females

  • 11–13-year-olds: niacin, folate, and sodium for males and females

  • 14–18-year-olds: niacin, folate, and sodium for males and females

  • 19–59-year-olds: folate and sodium for males and females; niacin for males

  • 60-year-olds and older: sodium for males and females; niacin and folate for males



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