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ings. (Resources for safe handling of milk include ADA [2004] and CDC [2010].) As an additional measure to support breastfeeding, the recommended meal pattern for infants does not provide juice for participants less than 1 year of age or complementary foods before 6 months of age. The committee encourages USDA to work together with other federal agencies as well as state- and local-level coalitions of WIC lactation consultants, and existing breastfeeding programs to consider ways to provide incentives for breastfeeding for both participants and providers. Options for breastfeeding incentives are provided in Appendix L.

SUMMARY

The recommended Meal Requirements encompass (1) daily and weekly meal patterns for breakfast, lunch and supper, and snacks appropriate for the age groups served by CACFP and (2) food specifications to help ensure the nutritional quality of the meals. Key elements of the Meal Requirements for children ages 1 year and older and for adults address (a) the amount of fruit and the amount and type of vegetables to be served; (b) the proportion of grain that is to be whole grain-rich; (c) fruit versus juice; (d) snack components over the course of the week; and (e) limitations on solid fats, added sugars, trans fat, and sodium. As described in Chapter 6, the recommendations were designed to align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the DRIs with necessary adjustments to keep them practical and to limit cost increases. Encouragement for breastfeeding is strongly supported by the committee. Realistic options for supporting breastfeeding, however, were determined to be beyond the task of making recommendations for revised Meal Requirements.

REFERENCES

AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics). 2009. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, 6th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

ADA (American Dietetic Association). 2004. Infant Feedings: Guidelines for Preparation of Formula and Breastmilk in Health Care Facilities, edited by S. T. Robbins and L. T. Beker. Chicago, IL: ADA.

Altkorn, R., X. Chen, S. Milkovich, D. Stool, G. Rider, C. M. Bailey, A. Haas, K. H. Riding, S. M. Pransky, and J. S. Reilly. 2008. Fatal and non-fatal food injuries among children (aged 0–14 years). International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology 72(7):1041–1046.

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). 2010. Proper Handling and Storage of Human Milk. http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/recommendations/handling_breastmilk.htm (accessed October 21, 2010).



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