Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Peter B. Lederman retired as executive director, Hazardous Substance Management Research Center, and Executive Director, Office of Intellectual Property, New Jersey Institute of Technology. He is active as the principal of Peter Lederman & Associates. He is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. He has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. Dr. Lederman has more than 50 years of broad experience in all facets of environmental management, control, and policy development; considerable experience in hazardous substance treatment and management; process design and development in the petrochemical industry; and more than 18 years of experience as an educator. He has industrial experience as a process designer and has managed the development of new processes through full-scale plant demonstrations. He is well known for his work as a professor in chemical process design. He led his company’s safety program in the early 1980s. He directed the nation’s oil spill R&D effort in the 1970s when he was at the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Lederman is a registered professional engineer, registered professional planner, and a diplomate in environmental engineering. Dr. Lederman has also worked at the federal (EPA) and state levels with particular emphasis on environmental policy. He is a national associate of the National Academies. Dr. Lederman has been a chair and a member of several NRC committees related to the demilitarization of chemical weapons, including serving as chair of the “Stockpile” Committee from 1999 to 2003 and chairing the committee that produced the 2002 NRC report Closure and Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System.


Gary S. Groenewold is a staff scientist who has conducted research in surface chemistry, gas-phase chemistry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 1991. His research has focused on determining the speciation of absorbed radioactive and toxic metals (U, Np, Pu, Am, Hg, Al, and Cu) and organic compounds (e.g., VX, G agents, HD, organophosphates, amines, and sulfides). Prior to this, Dr. Groenewold served three years in line management at the INL and as the technical leader of an environmental organic analysis group. Before going to the INL, Dr. Groenewold worked in anticancer drug discovery for Bristol-Myers, using mass spectrometry as an identification tool. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Nebraska, where he studied ion-molecule condensation and elimination reactions in the gas phase. He has authored 85 scientific publications on these subjects.


Deborah L. Grubbe is currently the president of Operations and Safety Solutions, LLC. Most recently she was vice-president, Group Safety and Industrial Hygiene, for BP International where she was accountable for providing global safety leadership in all business areas. Prior to that, Ms. Grubbe was employed by DuPont in Wilmington, Delaware, where she held corporate director positions in safety, operations, and engi-



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appendix e Biographical sketches of committee members Peter B. Lederman retired as executive director, to 2003 and chairing the committee that produced the Hazardous Substance Management Research Center, 2002 NRC report Closure and Johnston Atoll Chemical and Executive Director, Office of Intellectual Property, Agent Disposal System. New Jersey Institute of Technology. He is active as Gary S. Groenewold is a staff scientist who has the principal of Peter Lederman & Associates. He is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the New conducted research in surface chemistry, gas-phase Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. He has chemistry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry at a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 1991. His of Michigan. Dr. Lederman has more than 50 years research has focused on determining the speciation of of broad experience in all facets of environmental absorbed radioactive and toxic metals (U, Np, Pu, Am, management, control, and policy development; con- Hg, Al, and Cu) and organic compounds (e.g., Vx, G siderable experience in hazardous substance treatment agents, HD, organophosphates, amines, and sulfides). and management; process design and development in Prior to this, Dr. Groenewold served three years in line the petrochemical industry; and more than 18 years of management at the INL and as the technical leader of experience as an educator. He has industrial experience an environmental organic analysis group. Before going as a process designer and has managed the development to the INL, Dr. Groenewold worked in anticancer drug of new processes through full-scale plant demonstra- discovery for Bristol-Myers, using mass spectrometry tions. He is well known for his work as a professor in as an identification tool. He received his Ph.D. in chem- chemical process design. He led his company’s safety istry at the University of Nebraska, where he studied program in the early 1980s. He directed the nation’s ion-molecule condensation and elimination reactions in oil spill R&D effort in the 1970s when he was at the the gas phase. He has authored 85 scientific publica- Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Lederman is tions on these subjects. a registered professional engineer, registered profes- Deborah L. Grubbe is currently the president of sional planner, and a diplomate in environmental engi- neering. Dr. Lederman has also worked at the federal Operations and Safety Solutions, LLC. Most recently (EPA) and state levels with particular emphasis on she was vice-president, Group Safety and Industrial environmental policy. He is a national associate of the Hygiene, for BP International where she was account- National Academies. Dr. Lederman has been a chair able for providing global safety leadership in all busi- and a member of several NRC committees related to the ness areas. Prior to that, Ms. Grubbe was employed by demilitarization of chemical weapons, including serv- DuPont in Wilmington, Delaware, where she held cor- ing as chair of the “Stockpile” Committee from 1999 porate director positions in safety, operations, and engi- 

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0 REVIEW OF CLOSURE PLANS FOR THE BASELINE INCINERATION CHEMICAL AGENT DISPOSAL FACILITIES neering. Her many assignments have included capital Treater Design for the Blue Grass Chemical Agent project implementation, strategic safety assessments, Destruction Pilot Plant, as well as the NRC Panel on manufacturing management, and human resources. Benchmarking the Research Competitiveness of the In 2007, Ms. Grubbe chaired the National Institute United States in Mechanical Engineering. He is a mem- of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee for ber of the National Academy of Engineering. Advanced Technology. She has served as a consultant Todd A. Kimmell is principal investigator with the to the Columbia Shuttle Accident Investigation Board and has been appointed to the NASA Aerospace Safety Environmental Science Division at the U.S. Depart- Advisory Panel. From 2005 to 2008, Ms. Grubbe was ment of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory. He a member of the Board of Directors of American Insti- is an environmental scientist and policy analyst, with tute of Chemical Engineers, and she sat on the Board more than 30 years of experience in solid and hazardous of Advisors to the Center for Chemical Process Safety. waste management, permitting and regulatory com- She is currently a member of the Board of Trustees of pliance, cleanup programs, environmental programs the National Safety Council. She serves as a member p olicy development, and emergency management of the Purdue University College of Engineering Advi- and homeland security. He has supported the Army’s sory Council and was the first woman and youngest chemical and conventional munitions management elected member on the State of Delaware Registration programs, and has contributed to the Army’s Assem- Board for Professional Engineers (1985-1989). Ms. bled Chemical Weapons Assessment Program and the Grubbe graduated with a B.S. in chemical engineer- Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. ing with highest distinction from Purdue University. Mr. Kimmell also has a strong technical background in She received a Winston Churchill Fellowship to attend analytical and physical/chemical test method develop- Cambridge University in England, where she received ment, and analytical quality assurance and control. He a Certificate of Post-Graduate Study in Chemical has served on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Engineering. She is a registered professional engineer National Homeland Security Research Center on envi- in Delaware. Ms. Grubbe has been a member of sev- ronmental test methods for chemical, biological, and eral NRC committees related to the demilitarization radiological assessment for emergency response. Mr. of chemical weapons, including the committee that Kimmell has also supported a number of environmental produced the 2002 NRC report Closure and Johnston permitting programs at Army chemical weapons stor- Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System. age sites and at open burning/open detonation sites. He graduated from George Washington University with an John R. Howell (NAE) is the Ernest Cockrell, Jr., M.S. in environmental science. Memorial Chair and Baker Hughes Incorporated Cen- Kalithil E. Philipose is a senior research engineer tennial Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a former director and project manager with Atomic Energy of Canada of the Advanced Manufacturing Center at the Univer- at the Chalk River Laboratories Centre. He holds a sity of Texas. Professor Howell received his Ph.D. in master’s degree in civil and structural engineering and engineering, his M.S. in chemical engineering, and his is a registered professional engineer with the province B.S. in chemical engineering, from the Case Institute of Ontario, Canada. He has more than 35 years of of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University). experience on various projects involving design and Professor Howell joined the faculty of the University construction of nuclear waste disposal facilities and of Texas at Austin. He has received national and inter- decommissioning of major facilities contaminated with national recognition for his continuing research in highly radioactive waste materials. He was responsible radiative transfer, particularly for adapting Monte Carlo for developing a durable concrete with an engineered techniques to radiative transfer analysis. His recent service life of 500 years for a low-level waste reposi- research has centered on inverse analysis techniques tory. His responsibilities included decommissioning applied to the design and control of thermal systems planning of large, buried carbon steel tanks containing with significant radiative transfer. Professor Howell heels of high-level waste, and research and develop- served on the NRC Committee to Review and Assess ment on the storage of cement-grouted fissile high- Developmental Issues Concerning the Metal Parts level liquid waste, development of aging management

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 APPENDIX E program guidelines for detection and monitoring of a professional engineer who has also advised industry aging related degradation, and mitigation for nuclear and regulatory groups. generating stations and waste disposal facilities. W. Leigh Short, with a Ph.D. in chemical engineering Louis T. Phillips is director of engineering for Resource: from the University of Michigan, retired as a principal PM. Most recently he was a senior process design con- and vice president of Woodward-Clyde responsible for sultant for Sunoco, Inc., Philadelphia. Prior to that, the management and business development activities he was a process design engineer for ICI Americas in associated with the company’s hazardous waste ser- Wilmington, Delaware. He has more than 33 years of vices in Wayne, New Jersey. Dr. Short has expertise in experience in process plant engineering; his assign- air pollution, chemical process engineering, hazardous ments have included process design, project engineer- waste services, feasibility studies and site remedia- ing, decommissioning, and maintenance, along with tion, and project management. He has taught courses safety relief system and hazop studies. At Sunoco he in control technologies, both to graduate students and was the project manager for decommissioning of a as a part of the EPA’s national training programs. He lubricants storage and blending facility that included has served as chairman of the NOx control technology removing from service more than 200 storage tanks review panel for the EPA. Dr. Short’s considerable proj- while complying with Pennsylvania storage tank envi- ect management experience related to remediation and ronmental regulations. Mr. Phillips was responsible for closure of large industrial sites is of direct application authoring the Sunoco mothballing, decommissioning, to the work of this committee. Dr. Short was a member and demolition procedures and was program manager of the committee that produced the 2002 NRC report for these efforts throughout the Northeast Refining Closure and Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal Division. Mr. Phillips has authored a publication on System. decommissioning of process plants. He received his Leonard M. Siegel is executive director of the Moun- M.S. in chemical engineering from Villanova Uni- versity and his B.S. in chemical engineering from the tain View, California-based Center for Public Envi- New Jersey Institute of Technology. He is a registered ronmental Oversight (CPEO), a project of the Pacific professional engineer in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Studies Center that facilitates public participation in and Delaware. the oversight of military environmental programs, fed- eral facilities cleanup, and Brownfields revitalization. Danny D. Reible (NAE) is currently the Bettie Marga- He is one of the environmental movement’s leading ret Smith Chair of Environmental Health Engineering experts on military facility contamination, community Coordinator for the University of Texas. He received a oversight of cleanup, and the vapor intrusion pathway. B.S. from Lamar University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. For his organization, he runs two Internet newsgroups: from California Institute of Technology—all in chemi- the Military Environmental Forum and the Brownfields cal engineering. Dr. Reible leads both fundamental and Internet Forum. Mr. Siegel also serves on numerous applied efforts in the assessment of risks of hazardous advisory committees. He is a member of the Interstate substances. Dr. Reible has led the development of in situ Technology & Regulatory Council’s work team on sediment capping, and he has evaluated the applicability permeable reactive barriers, the Department of Toxic of capping technology to a wide range of contaminants Substances Control (California) External Advisory and settings including PAHs from fuels, manufactured Group, and the Moffett Field (former Moffett Naval gas plants and creosote manufacturing facilities, PCBs, Air Station) Restoration Advisory Board. and metals. He has also advised both industry and regu- David A. Skiven is currently serving as co-director of latory groups on the applicability and design of capping for remediation at a variety of specific sites. His research the Engineering Society of Detroit (ESD) Institute. He has focused on the natural attenuation processes of con- is recently retired as the executive director of the Gen- taminants as a result of a variety of processes in the envi- eral Motors Corporation Worldwide Facilities Group. ronment. These processes are biological, chemical, and As GM’s Center of Facilities Expertise, the Worldwide physical in nature, and thus the research has encouraged Facilities Group is responsible for providing global the development of interdisciplinary teams focused on leadership in the facilities, utilities, construction, and understanding and manipulating these processes. He is environmental segments, allowing corporate clients

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 REVIEW OF CLOSURE PLANS FOR THE BASELINE INCINERATION CHEMICAL AGENT DISPOSAL FACILITIES to focus on their core business, resulting in structural manager at PSEG in Newark, New Jersey, working on cost savings and improved utilization of assets. After issues related to land use, waste, and site remediation joining GM’s Fisher Body Division in 1970, Mr. programs for the company’s combined electric and Skiven worked in various engineering operations. He gas businesses. She has 10 years of experience as an was plant engineer at the Fisher Guide-Trenton, New environmental regulator in the New Jersey Department Jersey, plant from 1981 to 1985. Subsequently, he was of Environmental Protection developing program and named manager of Manufacturing Planning, Industrial policy initiatives for the Site Remediation and Waste Engineering, and Facilities at Fisher Guide Division’s Management programs, including work on the state’s General Office. In 1985, he was appointed manager first Brownfield law. She has presented at numerous o f Facilities and Future Programs Manufacturing national forums on matters related to site remediation, Engineering for the Saturn Corporation. In 1992, Mr. redevelopment, and brownfields. She holds a B.A. in Skiven was promoted to director of Plant Environment chemistry and physics from Wheaton College. and the Environmental Energy Staff, and in early 1993, L awrence J. Washington , retired corporate vice he was appointed executive director of the Worldwide Facilities Group. He has served on the NRC’s Board president for Sustainability and Environmental Health on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment. and Safety (EH&S), worked for the Dow Chemical Mr. Skiven has been a frequent advisor to a number Company for more than 37 years. Among his many of federal facilities organizations, including the U.S. distinctions, Mr. Washington chaired the Corporate Navy and the U.S. Air Force. He is currently consult- Environmental Advisory Council and the EH&S Man- ing in the facilities-related fields. He is also on the agement Board and Crisis Management Team. He also Board of Directors of BioReaction, Inc., a pollution served as an officer of the company. In his previous role control technology company. He recently received as corporate vice president, EH&S, Human Resources, ESD’s Horace H. Rackham Humanitarian Award, the and Public Affairs, Mr. Washington supported the cre- highest award given by the society. Mr. Skiven has a ation of the Genesis Award Program for Excellence B.S. from General Motors Institute (GMI) and an M.S. in People Development and initiated several new pro- from Wayne State University. He is also a registered grams to support employee development. His career professional engineer. included many roles in operations, including leader of Dow’s Western Division and general manager and site Sheryl A. Telford is director of the DuPont Corporate leader for Michigan operations. Mr. Washington earned Remediation Group, managing the company’s global bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemical engineer- environmental remediation responsibilities. Prior to ing from the University of Detroit. joining DuPont, she was an environmental policy