ATTACHMENT A
STATEMENT OF TASK

Anniston is proceeding to design and install a Dynasafe SDC1200 system to destroy problematic mustard-filled munitions. These will include currently stored, overpacked 4.2-inch mortars and 105-mm projectiles, all rejects generated during future operations, and possibly 2,500 M60 105-mm rounds with a single safety feature fuze.

The Dynasafe SDC2000, in operation at the GEKA facility at Munster in Germany, performs well and serves as a solid basis for the design of an effective system for Anniston. However, the pollution abatement system (PAS) planned for Anniston is different in some aspects from the PAS employed at Munster. For example, a bulk oxidizer is used for further potential treatment of the off-gas from the detonation chamber in place of the secondary combustion chamber used at Munster. The Anniston PAS includes a spray dryer, whereas the Munster PAS does not. The Munster PAS design includes several features that the Anniston PAS potentially does not: including use of a cyclone immediately downstream of the expansion tank for particulate control, use of ammonia injection for control of oxides of nitrogen, and the use of a caustic scrubber in addition to acid and neutral scrubbers.

Therefore, to minimize safety or operational problems during systemization and subsequent munition destruction campaigns, the Army would benefit from a review by the NRC of this SDC system, with emphasis on the PAS.

The NRC will establish a committee to:

  • Obtain detailed information on the design of the Anniston Dynasafe SDC1200 CM system and review and comment on the design of the system with emphasis on the pollution abatement system (PAS). Determine the design basis for each unit operation and review materials of construction. Compare the design of the PAS being designed for Anniston with that currently in use at the GEKA facility in Munster, Germany and identify all differences. Evaluate any potential impacts of these differences.

  • Obtain requirements for agent destruction within the Static Detonation Chamber (SDC) system and for emissions from the PAS. Evaluate and comment on the ability of the planned SDC system to meet these requirements.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 35
ATTACHMENT A STATEMENT OF TASK Anniston is proceeding to design and install a Dynasafe SDC1200 system to destroy problematic mustard-filled munitions. These will include currently stored, overpacked 4.2-inch mortars and 105-mm projectiles, all rejects generated during future operations, and possibly 2,500 M60 105-mm rounds with a single safety feature fuze. The Dynasafe SDC2000, in operation at the GEKA facility at Munster in Germany, performs well and serves as a solid basis for the design of an effective system for Anniston. However, the pollution abatement system (PAS) planned for Anniston is different in some aspects from the PAS employed at Munster. For example, a bulk oxidizer is used for further potential treatment of the off-gas from the detonation chamber in place of the secondary combustion chamber used at Munster. The Anniston PAS includes a spray dryer, whereas the Munster PAS does not. The Munster PAS design includes several features that the Anniston PAS potentially does not: including use of a cyclone immediately downstream of the expansion tank for particulate control, use of ammonia injection for control of oxides of nitrogen, and the use of a caustic scrubber in addition to acid and neutral scrubbers. Therefore, to minimize safety or operational problems during systemization and subsequent munition destruction campaigns, the Army would benefit from a review by the NRC of this SDC system, with emphasis on the PAS. The NRC will establish a committee to: Obtain detailed information on the design of the Anniston Dynasafe SDC1200 CM system and review and comment on the design of the system with emphasis on the pollution abatement system (PAS). Determine the design basis for each unit operation and review materials of construction. Compare the design of the PAS being designed for Anniston with that currently in use at the GEKA facility in Munster, Germany and identify all differences. Evaluate any potential impacts of these differences. Obtain requirements for agent destruction within the Static Detonation Chamber (SDC) system and for emissions from the PAS. Evaluate and comment on the ability of the planned SDC system to meet these requirements. -35-