Click for next page ( 24


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 23
Preparing for the Challenges of Population Aging in Asia: Strengthening the Scientific Basis of Policy Development http://www.nap.edu/catalog/12977.html NoTeS 1 Kinsella, K., and gist, Y.J. (1995). Older Workers, Retirement, and Pensions: A Comparative International Chartbook. Washington, DC: u.s. Census Bureau. 2 see, for example, united nations. (2002). Madrid International Plan of Action. available: http://www.un.org/ ageing/madrid_intlplanaction.html [accessed september 2010]. 3 see, for example, government of india. (1999). National Policy on Older Persons. available: http://www. jnanajyothi.com/national%20PoliCY.doc [accessed september 2010]. 4united nations. (2008).World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision. new York: united nations Department of economic and social affairs, Population Division. 5Bloom, D.e., and Canning, D. (2008). global demographic change: Dimensions and economic significance. in a. Prskawetz, D.e. Bloom, and W. lutz (eds.), Population Aging, Human Capital Accumulation, and Productivity Growth. new York: Population Council. 6Bloom, D.e., Canning, D., and fink, g. (2010). the graying of global population and its macroeconomic consequences. 21st Society-Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences, 5(2). 7Bloom, D.e., Mahal, a., rosenberg, l., and sevilla, J. (2010). economic security arrangements in the context of population ageing in india. special Double issue: social security and the Challenge of Demographic Change. International Social Security Review, 63, 3-4. 8alam, M. (2006). Ageing in India: Socio-Economic and Health Dimensions. new Delhi, india: academic foundation. 9Cameron, l.a., and Cobb-Clark, D. (2005). Do Coresidency with and Financial Transfers from Children Reduce the Need for Elderly Parents to Work in Developing Countries? Discussion Paper no. 58. Canberra: Center for economic Policy research, the australian national university. 10east-West Center. (2002). The Future of Population in Asia. honolulu, hawaii: east-West Center. 11Janevic, M.J., ajrouch, K.J., Merline, a., akiyama, h., and antonucci, t.C. (2000). the social relations- physical health connection: a connection of elderly samples from the united states and Japan. Journal of Health Psychology, 5(4), 413-429. 12u.s. Department of health and human services and u.s. Department of state. (2007). Why Population Aging Matters: A Global Perspective. Publication no. 07-6134. Bethesda, MD: national institutes of health. 13alam, M. (2004). ageing, old age income security and reforms: an exploration of indian situation. Economic and Political Weekly, 39(33), 3,731-3,740. 14Cameron, l.a., and Cobb-Clark, D. (2005). see note 9. 15united nations. (2007). World Population Ageing 2007. new York: united nations Department of economic and social affairs, Population Division. 16Jamuna, D. (2000). ageing in india: some key issues. Ageing International, 25(4), 16-31. 17Knodel, J., ofstedal, M.B., and hermalin, a.i. (2002). the demographic, socioeconomic, and cultural context of the four study countries. in a.i. hermalin (ed.), The Well-Being of the Elderly in Asia: A Four-Country Comparative Study. ann arbor: university of Michigan Press. 18east-West Center. (2002). see note 10.  PreParing for the Challenges of PoPulation aging in asia Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

OCR for page 23
Preparing for the Challenges of Population Aging in Asia: Strengthening the Scientific Basis of Policy Development http://www.nap.edu/catalog/12977.html 19 hermalin, a.i., Chan, a., Biddlecom, a., and ofstedal, M.B. (2002). Work, retirement, and leisure. in a.i. hermalin (ed.), The Well-Being of the Elderly in Asia: A Four-Country Comparative Study. ann arbor: university of Michigan Press. 20 Chanana, h.B., and talwar, P.P. (1987). aging in india: its socioeconomic and health implications. Asia- Pacific Population Journal, 2(3), 23-38. 21 Banister, J., Bloom, D.e., and rosenberg, l. (2010). Population Aging and Economic Growth in China. Program on the global Demography of aging, Working Paper no. 53. Cambridge, Ma: harvard Center for Population and Development studies, harvard university. 22 organisation for economic Co-operation and Development. (2009). Pensions at a Glance: Asia/Pacific. available: http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/33/53/41966940.pdf [accessed september 2010]. 23united nations. (2009). Rethinking Poverty: Report on the World Situation 2010. new York: united nations Department of economic and social affairs. 24Bloom et al. (2010). see note 7. 25Banister et al. (2010). see note 21. 26see, for example, national research Council. (2001). Preparing for an Aging World: The Case for Cross-National Research. Panel on a research agenda and new Data for an aging World. Washington, DC: national academy Press. 27Chatterji, s., Kowal, P., Mathers, C., naidoo, n., Verdes, e., smith, J.P., and suzman, r. (2008). the health of aging populations in China and india. Health Affairs, 27(4), 1,052-1,063. 28east-West Center. (2002). see note 10. 29Bloom et al. (2010). see note 7. 30arifianto, a. (2006). Public Policy Toward the Elderly in Indonesia: Current Policy and Future Directions. Jakarta, indonesia: sMeru research institute. 31east-West Center. (2002). see note 10. 32Banister et al. (2010). see note 21. 33sierra, f., hadley, e., suzman, r., and hodes, r. (2009). Prospects for life span extension. Annual Review of Medicine, 60, 457-469. 34 national research Council (2001). see note 26. 35 Public versions of Mhas, elsa, share, and hrs data are available online.  PreParing for the Challenges of PoPulation aging in asia Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

OCR for page 23
Preparing for the Challenges of Population Aging in Asia: Strengthening the Scientific Basis of Policy Development http://www.nap.edu/catalog/12977.html AUTHORING COMMITTEES CHINESE ACADEMY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES ZHENZHEN ZHENg (Chair), Institute of Population and Labor Economics, Beijing FANg CAI, Institute of Population and Labor Economics, Beijing YANg Du, Institute of Population and Labor Economics, Beijing guANgZHOu WANg, Institute of Population and Labor Economics, Beijing INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY P.N. TANDON (Chair), National Brain Research Centre, Haryana MONEEr ALAM, Population Research Centre, Institute of Economic Growth, New Delhi P. ArOkIASAMY, Department of Development Studies, International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai A.B. DEY, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi INDONESIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES M AYLINg OEY-gArDINEr (Chair), Faculty of Economics, University of Indonesia, Jakarta r. SjAMSuHIDAjAT, School of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta NATIONAL rESEArCH COuNCIL OF THE u.S. NATIONAL ACADEMIES jAMES P. SMITH (Chair), Labor and Population Division, RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California P. ArOkIASAMY, International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai, India DAvID BLOOM, School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts DANIEL COTLEAr, Human Development Network, World Bank, Washington, DC HIDEHIkO ICHIMurA, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo, Japan DANIEL MCFADDEN, Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley k. SrINATH r EDDY, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi, India DAvID WEIr, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor YAOHuI ZHAO, National School of Development, Peking University, Beijing, China XuEjIN ZuO, Institute of Economics, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, China SCIENCE COuNCIL OF jAPAN HIrOkO AkIYAMA, Institute of Gerontology, University of Tokyo Staff BArNEY COHEN, Director, Committee on Population, National Research Council M ALAY M AjMuNDAr, Senior Program Associate, Committee on Population, National Research Council jACquELINE r. SOvDE, Program Associate, Committee on Population, National Research Council Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

OCR for page 23
Preparing for the Challenges of Population Aging in Asia: Strengthening the Scientific Basis of Policy Development http://www.nap.edu/catalog/12977.html ACKNOWLEDGMENTS T his report is the result of a unique collaboration between the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, the Indian National Science Academy, the Indonesian Academy of Sciences, the National Research Council of the U.S. National Academies, and the Science Council of Japan. It would not have been possible without a great deal of effort and goodwill on the part of a large number of people. Special thanks go to the representatives of the various academies for giving so much of their valuable time and expertise to make this report possible. This project was undertaken at the request of the Division of Behavioral and Social Research at the U.S. National Institute on Aging (NIA) and was made possible by funding from NIA. Particular thanks go to Dr. Richard Suzman as the intellectual and financial catalyst for the project. Thanks, too, to the Carnegie Foundation, which provided financial support for a 2010 planning meeting for representatives of the five academies, held in New Delhi, India. Staff of the U.S. National Academies made significant contributions to the report: Barney Cohen, for developing the study and providing guidance and support to staff throughout the project; Malay Majmundar, for research and writing assistance; Robert Pool, for writing assistance; Jacqui Sovde, for logistical support; Kirsten Sampson Snyder, for help guiding the report through review; Eugenia Grohman, for skillful editing; and Yvonne Wise, for managing the production process. The report was reviewed in draft form by individuals selected by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Indian National Science Academy, Indonesia Academy of Sciences, the Science Council of Japan, and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences who were chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. In accordance with procedures of the U.S. National Academies, we thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Eileen Crimmins, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California; Charlotte Ikels, Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University; Ron Lee, Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging, University of California, Berkeley; Duncan Thomas, Department of Economics, Duke University; Victoria Velkoff, Population Estimates and Projections, U.S. Census Bureau; and Dewen Wang, Beijing Office, World Bank. The review of this report was overseen by Douglas Massey, Department of Sociology, Princeton University. Photo credits: Cover: © 2009 Malcolm Ainsworth/GettyImages; p. 7: © RedChopsticks; p. 8: © imagewerks; p. 9: © Ignacio Ayestaran/Flickr; p. 14: © PhotosIndia; p. 15: © PhotoDisc; p. 17: © UN Photo/Andrea Brizzi; p. 21: © PhotoDisc; p. 23: © Corbis; p. 26: © Rob Melnychuk/Digital Vision. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.