Appendix B
Biosketches of Members of the Committee

William L. Scherlis, Chair, is a professor in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). He is the founding director of CMU’s PhD program in software engineering and director of CMU’s Institute for Software Research (ISR). His research relates to software assurance, software evolution, and technology to support software teams. Dr. Scherlis joined the CMU faculty after completing a PhD in computer science at Stanford University, a year at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland) as a John Knox Fellow, and an A.B. at Harvard University. He was the lead principal investigator of the 4-year High Dependability Computing Project (HDCP), in which CMU led a collaboration of five universities to help NASA address long-term software dependability challenges. Dr. Scherlis is involved in a number of activities related to technology and policy, recently testifying before Congress on innovation and information technology, and, previously, on roles for a federal Chief Information Officer (CIO). He interrupted his career at CMU to serve at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for 6 years, departing in 1993 as senior executive responsible for coordination of software research. While at DARPA he had responsibility for research and strategy in computer security, aspects of high-performance computing, information infrastructure, and other topics. Dr. Scherlis was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) study committee on cybersecurity and the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group (ISAT). He recently completed chairing an NRC study on information technology, innovation, and e-government. He has led or participated in national studies related to cybersecurity, crisis response, analyst information management, Department of Defense software management, and health care informatics infrastructure. He has been an advisor to major information technology (IT) companies. He has served as program chair for a number of technical conferences, including the ACM Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE) Symposium. He has more than 75 scientific publications.


Robert F. Behler is a senior vice president and general manager in the MITRE Corporation Command and Control Center. The center serves MITRE’s Department of Defense sponsors and focuses on creating a joint command, control, and communications system. Mr. Behler leads the center’s work for Department of Defense sponsors. Before joining MITRE in April 2006, Mr. Behler was general manager of Precision Engagement at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory. In this position he supervised more than 250 scientists and engineers working on advanced command, control, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C2ISR) programs for the Department of Defense. Under Mr.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 143
Appendix B Biosketches of Members of the Committee William L. Scherlis, Chair, is a professor in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon Univer- sity (CMU). He is the founding director of CMU’s PhD program in software engineering and director of CMU’s Institute for Software Research (ISR). His research relates to software assurance, software evolu - tion, and technology to support software teams. Dr. Scherlis joined the CMU faculty after completing a PhD in computer science at Stanford University, a year at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland) as a John Knox Fellow, and an A.B. at Harvard University. He was the lead principal investigator of the 4-year High Dependability Computing Project (HDCP), in which CMU led a collaboration of five universities to help NASA address long-term software dependability challenges. Dr. Scherlis is involved in a number of activities related to technology and policy, recently testifying before Congress on innovation and infor- mation technology, and, previously, on roles for a federal Chief Information Officer (CIO). He interrupted his career at CMU to serve at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for 6 years, departing in 1993 as senior executive responsible for coordination of software research. While at DARPA he had responsibility for research and strategy in computer security, aspects of high-performance com - puting, information infrastructure, and other topics. Dr. Scherlis was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) study committee on cybersecurity and the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group (ISAT). He recently completed chairing an NRC study on information technology, inno - vation, and e-government. He has led or participated in national studies related to cybersecurity, crisis response, analyst information management, Department of Defense software management, and health care informatics infrastructure. He has been an advisor to major information technology (IT) companies. He has served as program chair for a number of technical conferences, including the ACM Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE) Symposium. He has more than 75 scientific publications. Robert F. Behler is a senior vice president and general manager in the MITRE Corporation Command and Control Center. The center serves MITRE’s Department of Defense sponsors and focuses on cre - ating a joint command, control, and communications system. Mr. Behler leads the center’s work for Department of Defense sponsors. Before joining MITRE in April 2006, Mr. Behler was general manager of Precision Engagement at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory. In this position he supervised more than 250 scientists and engineers working on advanced command, control, intel - ligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C2ISR) programs for the Department of Defense. Under Mr. 4

OCR for page 143
44 CRITICAL CODE: SOFTWARE PRODUCIBILITY FOR DEFENSE Behler’s leadership, the Precision Engagement organization turned new and emerging technologies into transformational operational capabilities. Mr. Behler retired from the Air Force as a major general in 2003. During his distinguished 31-year career, he accumulated extensive experience managing and developing advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) technologies at all levels. Before retiring, Mr. Behler was commander of the Air Force C2ISR Center at Langley Air Force Base, where he was principal C2ISR advisor to the secretary and chief of staff of the Air Force. Prior to that, he served as deputy commander of NATO Joint Head - quarters North in Stavanger, Norway, and was the senior U.S. military officer in Scandinavia. He has also served as director of command, control, communication, computers, and intelligence at the U.S. Strategic Command at Offutt Air Force Base and as chief of the U.S. Air Force Senate Liaison Office. Mr. Behler entered the Air Force in 1972 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program at the University of Oklahoma. Mr. Behler received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1970 and 1972, respectively. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base and was a National Security Fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government in 1990. He received a master’s degree in business administration from Marymount University in 1991. He is an associate fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots and a member of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association. Barry W. Boehm is TRW Professor of Software Engineering and founding Director Emeritus of the Center for Systems and Software Engineering at the University of Southern California. He is also director of research of the DoD-Stevens-USC Systems Engineering Research Center and co-director of the USC- Chinese Academy of Sciences Joint Laboratory for Software Engineering. His contributions to the field include the Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO); the Spiral Model of the software process; the Theory W (win-win) approach to and tools for software management and requirements determination. Between 1989 and 1992, he served within the U.S. Department of Defense as director of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Office and as director of the DDR&E Software and Computer Technology Office. He worked at TRW from 1973 to 1989, culminating as chief scientist of the Defense Systems Group, and at the Rand Corporation from 1959 to 1973, culminating as head of the Information Sciences Depart - ment. He was a programmer-analyst at General Dynamics between 1955 and 1959. He has served on the board of several scientific journals, including the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer, IEEE Software, ACM Computing Reiews, Automated Software Engineering, Software Process, and Information and Software Technology. He has served as chair of the AIAA Technical Committee on Com- puter Systems, chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Software Engineering, and as a member of the Governing Board of the IEEE Computer Society. He has served as chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board’s Information Technology Panel and chair of the Board of Visitors for the CMU Software Engineering Institute. He is a fellow of the leading professional societies in computing (ACM), aerospace (AIAA), electronics (IEEE), and systems engineering (INCOSE), and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Boehm received his B.A. degree from Harvard in 1957; his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1961 and 1964, all in mathematics; and an honorary SC.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts in 2000 in computer science. Lori A. Clarke is a professor of computer science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and co-director of the Laboratory for Advanced Software Engineering Research. She is an ACM Fellow and a board member of CRA-W. She is a former IEEE Distinguished Visitor, ACM National Lecturer, IEEE Publication Board member, associate editor of ACM TOPLAS and IEEE TSE, member of the CCR NSF advisory board, ACM SIGSOFT secretary/treasurer, vice-chair and chair, vice-chair of CRA, and co-chair of CRA-W, as well as a 1990 recipient of the University of Massachusetts Chancellor’s Medal and a 1993 recipient of a University Faculty Fellowship. Dr. Clarke has worked in the area of software engineering, particularly on software analysis and testing for many years. She was one of the primary developers of symbolic execution, a technique used to reason about the behavior of software systems and

OCR for page 143
4 APPENDIX B for selecting test data, and she has made contributions in the areas of software architecture and object management. Recently her work has focused on analysis of concurrent systems. With colleagues, she developed FLAVERS, a static analysis tool that uses data-flow analysis to verify user-specified properties of concurrent systems, and PROPEL, a system that complements FLAVERS and other model checking systems by helping users elucidate the details of the properties to be proven. She received her B.A. in mathematics (1969) from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. degree in computer science (1976) from the University of Colorado. Michael A. Cusumano is the Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management, with a joint appointment in MIT’s Engineering Systems Division. He received a B.A. degree from Princeton in 1976 and a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1984, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in production and operations management at the Harvard Business School during 1984-1986. He has received two Fulbright Fellowships as well as a Japan Foundation Fellowship for study at the University of Tokyo. He is currently a director of Patni Computer Systems, one of the largest IT services and custom software development firms based in India (NYSE: PTI), and Eliza Corporation, a specialist in speech recognition software applications, focused on healthcare. He is on the advisory board of FixStars Corp., a Japanese developer of high-performance com - puting applications. Professor Cusumano was named one of the most influential people in technology and IT by Silicon.com in 2009. He has consulted for approximately 100 firms and organizations around the world and is the author or co-author of 9 books. His newest book, Staying Power: Six Enduring Principles for Managing Strategy and Innoation in an Uncertain World (2010), is based on the 2009 Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at Oxford University. The Software Business (2004) was named one of the top busi- ness books of the year by Steve Lohr of the New York Times. The international best-seller Microsoft Secrets (1995, with Richard Selby) has been translated into 14 languages. Competing on Internet Time: Lessons from Netscape and Its Battle with Microsoft (1998, with David Yoffie) was named a top-10 book of the year by Busi- ness Week. In addition, he has published Platform Leadership: How Intel, Microsoft, and Cisco Drie Industry Innoation (2002, with Annabelle Gawer); Thinking Beyond Lean: Multi-Project Management at Toyota and Other Companies (1998, with Kentaro Nobeoka); Strategic Thinking for the Next Economy (2001, with Costas Markides); Japan’s Software Factories (1991); and The Japanese Automobile Industry (1985). Mary Ann Davidson is the chief security officer at Oracle Corporation, responsible for Oracle product security, as well as security evaluations, assessments, and incident handling. She represents Oracle on the board of directors of the Information Technology Information Security Analysis Center (IT-ISAC), and the editorial advisory board of SC Magazine. She was named one of Information Security’s top five “Women of Vision” and is a 2004 Fed100 award recipient from Federal Computer Week. She has served on the Defense Science Board and is a member of the Center for Strategic and International Studies Cyber Commission for the 44th President. She was recently named to the Information Systems Security Association Hall of Fame. She has also testified on the issue of cybersecurity to the U.S. House of Rep - resentatives (Energy and Commerce Committee, Armed Services Committee, and Homeland Security Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Emerging Threats and Science and Technology) and the U.S. Senate (Commerce, Science and Technology Committee). Ms. Davidson has a B.S.M.E. from the University of Virginia and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She has also served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps, during which she was awarded the Navy Achievement Medal. Larry Druffel is director emeritus and visiting scientist at the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, where he was the director from 1986 to 1996. From 1996 to 2006, he was president and CEO of SCRA, a public, non-profit research and development corporation engaged in the applica - tion of advanced technology. He is a member of the board of directors of Teknowledge Corporation. He was vice president for business development at Rational Software from 1983 to 1986 and served on the board of directors of Rational from 1986 to 1995. Dr. Druffel was on the faculty at the USAF Academy.

OCR for page 143
4 CRITICAL CODE: SOFTWARE PRODUCIBILITY FOR DEFENSE He later managed research programs in advanced software technology at DARPA. He was founding director of the Ada Joint Program Office, and then served as director of Computer Systems and Software (Research and Advanced Technology) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is the co-author of a computer science textbook and over 35 professional papers, including the chapter titled “Information Warfare” for the ACM Fiftieth Anniversary Book Beyond Computing. He has a B.S. in electrical engi- neering from the University of Illinois, an M.Sc. in computer science from the University of London, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Druffel is a fellow of the IEEE, and a fellow of the ACM. He has served on engineering advisory boards of the University of South Carolina, Clemson, and Embry Riddle University. Dr. Druffel chaired the AF Science Advisory Board Study on Information Architecture and co-chaired the Defense Science Board study on acquiring defense software commercially. He led the Defensive Information Warfare Panel for the AFSAB “New World Vistas.” He has served on numerous AFSAB, DSB, and NRC studies dealing with the use of information technol - ogy, including the National Research Council study Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station. Russell Frew is the vice president, CTO in the $17 billion Lockheed Martin, Electronic Systems Business Unit (ES). In this capacity he oversees both technology development and the program performance of over 18,000 engineers and 1400 programs. He is frequently called upon to lead engineering assistance teams that engage major programs across the corporation. In his capacity as the chief technical officer, he is also responsible for technology strategy and the investment plan. Additionally, Mr. Frew has executive responsibility for the LM Advanced Technology Laboratories in Cherry Hill, NJ. From 1999 to late 2003, Mr. Frew was on special assignment for the corporation. His duties made him the focal point between ES and Aeronautics business areas. In this capacity he led major program teams work - ing issues on the F-22’s avionics, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter’s Mission System, and the F-16 Advanced Mission Computer. As part of the COTS revolution, Mr. Frew authored and led the Lockheed Martin Proven Path electronics program. Originally conceived as an LM strategy for JSF, Proven Path evolved into an engineering discipline now being widely applied across fighter aircraft, Army missiles, and Navy ships. Prior to his appointment as vice president, Advanced Technology for MS2 in 1999, Frew spent 18 months as vice president, Technology for Government Electronics Systems (GES) in Moorestown, NJ. While with GES he managed technology programs such as COMBATS, which successfully introduced modular, object-oriented software for modern ship combat systems. From June 1996 to March 1997, Frew was the managing director of the Lockheed Martin Corp. Advanced Technology Laboratories—an applied research facility that develops advanced technology hardware and software solutions for varied defense applications. Prior to 1996, Mr. Frew managed the General Electric Aerospace, Artificial Intel - ligence lab for 8 years. There he oversaw activities in anti-submarine warfare, attack helicopter sensor- based reasoning, expert systems, and real-time embedded architectures. He succeeded in getting the Sea Shadow prototype stealth ship operational and then used this platform to test numerous technology concepts in a fully operational environment at sea with the U.S. Navy. In 1985 the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) selected him as one of the original program managers on the national Strategic Computing program DARPA initiated to meet Japan’s Fifth Generation challenge. Mr. Frew holds graduate and undergraduate degrees. He has served as a study panel member at the National Academy of Sciences and on the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science Advisory Board. He additionally spent 4 years as an ISAT board member and study lead for the director of DARPA. Mr. Frew currently serves as the chairman of the board for Technology Ventures Corp. (TVC) and formerly served as a director on the board of the ISx Corporation. A lifelong pilot, Mr. Frew holds a commercial pilot’s license with ratings in numerous single and multiengine aircraft. James Larus, director of the extreme Computing Group (xCG) in Microsoft Research, has been an active contributor to the programming languages, compiler, and computer architecture communities. He has published many papers and served on numerous program committees and NSF and NRC panels. Dr. Larus became an ACM Fellow in 2006. He joined Microsoft Research as a senior researcher in 1998

OCR for page 143
4 APPENDIX B to start and, for 5 years, led the Software Productivity Tools (SPT) group, which developed and applied a variety of innovative techniques in static program analysis and constructed tools that found defects (bugs) in software. This group’s research has had considerable impact on the research community, as well as being shipped in Microsoft products such as the Static Driver Verifier and Fx/Cop and other, widely used internal software development tools. Dr. Larus then became the research area manager for programming languages and tools and started the Singularity research project, which demonstrated that modern programming languages and software engineering techniques could fundamentally improve software architectures. Subsequently, he helped start xCG, which is developing the hardware and soft- ware to support cloud computing. Before joining Microsoft, Larus was an assistant and associate profes - sor of computer science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he published approximately 60 research papers and co-led the Wisconsin Wind Tunnel (WWT) research project with Professors Mark Hill and David Wood. WWT was a DARPA- and NSF-funded project that investigated new approaches to simulating, building, and programming parallel shared-memory computers. Larus’s research spanned a number of areas, including new and efficient techniques for measuring and recording executing pro - grams’ behavior, tools for analyzing and manipulating compiled and linked programs, programming languages for parallel computing, tools for verifying program correctness, and techniques for compiler analysis and optimization. Larus received his M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1989, and an A.B. in applied mathematics from Harvard in 1980. At Berkeley, Larus developed one of the first systems to analyze Lisp programs and determine how to best execute them on a parallel computer. Greg Morrisett is the Allen B. Cutting Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University. His current research interests are in the applications of programming language technology for building secure and reliable systems. In particular, he is interested in applications of advanced type systems, model checkers, certifying compilers, proof-carrying code, and inline reference monitors for building efficient and prov - ably secure systems. He is also interested in the design and application of high-level languages for new or emerging domains, such as sensor networks. Dr. Morrisett received his B.S. degree in mathematics and computer science from the University of Richmond (1989) and his Ph.D. degree in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University (1995). He spent about 7 years on the faculty of the Computer Science Department at Cornell University. In the 2002-2003 academic year, he took a sabbatical at Microsoft’s Cambridge Research Laboratory. In January of 2004, he moved to Harvard University. Walker Royce is vice president and chief software economist at IBM Software Group. Mr. Royce has man - aged large software engineering projects, consulted with a broad spectrum of IBM’s worldwide customer base, and developed software management approaches that exploit an iterative lifecycle, industry best practices, and architecture-first priorities. He is the author of two books: Software Project Management, A Unified Framework (Addison Wesley, 1998) and The Economics of Software Deelopment (Addison Wesley, 2009). From 1994 through 2009, Mr. Royce was the vice president and general manager of IBM’s World - wide Rational Services organization and led a team of 500 technical specialists in software delivery best practices and $100 million in consulting services. Before joining Rational/IBM, Mr. Royce spent 16 years in software project development, software technology development, and software management roles at TRW Electronics & Defense. He was a recipient of TRW’s Chairman’s Award for Innovation for his contributions in distributed architecture middleware and iterative software processes in 1990 and was named a TRW Technical Fellow in 1992. He received his B.A. in physics from the University of California and his M.S. in computer information and control engineering from the University of Michigan, and he completed 3 years of further study in computer science at UCLA. Doug C. Schmidt is the deputy director, Research, and chief technology officer at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute. He was previously a professor at Vanderbilt University, University of California, Irvine, and Washington University St. Louis. He also served as chief technol - ogy officer for Zircon Computing and Prism Technologies, where he was responsible for the companies’

OCR for page 143
4 CRITICAL CODE: SOFTWARE PRODUCIBILITY FOR DEFENSE technical vision, strategic directions, and growth. In addition, Dr. Schmidt served as a deputy office director and a program manager at DARPA, where he led the national R&D effort on middleware for DRE systems and was the co-chair for the Software Design and Productivity (SDP) Coordinating Group of the U.S. government’s multi-agency Information Technology Research and Development (IT R&D) Program, which formulated the multi-agency software research agenda. Dr. Schmidt has published 9 books and over 450 technical papers that cover a range of research topics, including patterns, optimiza - tion techniques, and empirical analyses of software frameworks and domain-specific modeling environ - ments that facilitate the development of distributed real-time and embedded (DRE) middleware and applications running over high-speed networks and embedded system interconnects. In addition to his government service, academic research, and commercial experience, Dr. Schmidt has two decades of experience leading the development of ACE, TAO, CIAO, and CoSMIC, which are widely used, open- source DRE middleware frameworks and model-driven tools that contain a rich set of components and domain-specific languages that implement patterns and product-line architectures for high-performance DRE systems. These technologies have been used successfully by thousands of developers at hundreds of companies worldwide on projects involving medical engineering systems, financial services, datacom/ telecom systems, national defense and security systems, and online gaming. Dr. Schmidt has Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in computer science from the University of California, Irvine, and M.A. and B.A degrees in sociology from the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA. John P. Stenbit is an independent consultant. He recently served as assistant secretary of defense for networks and information integration and as the DoD’s chief information officer. Mr. Stenbit has had a career that spans more than 30 years of public- and private-sector service in telecommunications and command and control. In addition to his recent service, his public service includes 2 years as principal deputy director of telecommunications and command and control systems, and 2 years as staff specialist for worldwide command and control systems, both in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Stenbit previously was executive vice president at TRW, retiring in May 2001. He joined TRW in 1968 and was responsible for the planning and analysis of advanced satellite surveillance systems. Prior to joining TRW, he held a position with the Aerospace Corporation involving command-and-control systems for missiles and satellites, and satellite data compression and pattern recognition. During this time, he was a Fulbright Fellow and Aerospace Corporation Fellow at the Technische Hogeschool, Einhoven, the Neth - erlands, concentrating on coding theory and data compression. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as chair of the Science and Technology Advisory Panel to the Director of Central Intelligence and as a member of the Science Advisory Group to the Directors of Naval Intelligence and the Defense Communications Agency. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. kevin J. Sullivan is an associate professor and a Virginia Engineering Foundation (VEF) Endowed Faculty Fellow in computer science at the University of Virginia, where he has worked since 1994. His research interests are mainly in software engineering and languages. He has served as associate editor for the Journal of Empirical Software Engineering and the ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology and on the program and executive committees of conferences including the ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE), the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD), and the ACM SIGPLAN-SIGACT Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages (POPL). He and his students are broadly inter- ested in the design and engineering of software-intensive systems, with an emphasis on the need for a value-based theory and practice of system design. Dr. Sullivan received his undergraduate degree from Tufts University in 1987 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science and engineering from the University of Washington in 1994.