Appendix A
Committee Biographies

Roger Chalkley, D. Phil., is senior associate dean of biomedical research education and training at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine. Dr. Chalkley is responsible for the overview of the activities of the Office of Biomedical Research Education and Training, including oversight of the Indisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biological Sciences, the M.D./Ph.D. program, postdoctoral affairs, and graduate student affairs as well as minority activities and supporting training grant applications. Dr. Chalkley was educated at Pembroke College, Oxford, in chemistry and did his postdoctoral research in gene regulation and chromatin structure in the laboratory of James Bonner at Caltech. After almost 20 years in the biochemistry department at the University of Iowa-School of Medicine, he moved to Vanderbilt in 1986. He has published almost 200 papers in chromatin research. Dr. Chalkley has had an active interest in graduate education for many years and was involved in the establishment of the IGP where he served as director for the past eight years. He has been a hardcore runner for 40 years and is a (self-described) competent rock climber.


William T. Greenough, Ph.D. (Vice Chair) (NAS), is Swanlund Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on neural mechanisms of learning and memory; neurobiology of long-term potentiation and epilepsy; mechanisms of the brain–behavioral development; neurobiology of the aging process; and plasticity of metabolic support components of the brain. Dr. Greenough’s awards and honors include AAAS fellow (1985), NIMH MERIT award (1989), member of the National Academy of Sciences (1992), Fragile X Foundation William Rosen Award for Outstanding Research (1998), University of Illinois Oakley-Kunde Award for Undergraduate Teaching (1998), and American Psychological Society William James Fellow Research Award (1998). He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1969. He brings to the committee his knowledge of neuropsychology and learning processes, which is an important area of NIH research. He also has a broad knowledge of training and research issues through his research support from the National Institute of Aging, National Institute of Mental Health, and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.


David Korn, M.D. (Vice Chair) (IOM), is presently the vice provost for research at Harvard University, a position he assumed in November 2008. Prior to that he served as chief scientific officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in Washington, D.C., from January 2008 to November 2008 and as AAMC’s senior vice president for biomedical and health sciences research from September 1997 to January 2008. Before joining AAMC, Dr. Korn served as Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professor and dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine from October 1984 to April 1995, and as vice president of Stanford University from January 1986 to April 1995. Before that he served as professor and chairman of the Department of Pathology at Stanford, and chief of the pathology service at the Stanford University Hospital since June 1968. Dr. Korn received his doctorate from Harvard University. He has been chairman of the Stanford University Committee on Research; president of the American Association of Pathologists (now the American Society for Investigative Pathology), from which he received the Gold-Headed Cane Award for lifetime achievement in 2004; president of the Association of Pathology Chairman; a member of the board of directors and the executive committee of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology; and a member of the board of directors of the Association of Academic Health Centers. Dr. Korn was a founder and chairman of the board of directors of the California Transplant Donor Network, one of the nation’s largest organ procurement organizations. More recently, he was a founder of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, a nonprofit corporation created to enhance and standardize the protection of human participants in medical research. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has served



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appendix a Committee Biographies Roger Chalkley, D. Phil., is senior associate dean of biomedi- also has a broad knowledge of training and research issues cal research education and training at the Vanderbilt School of through his research support from the National Institute of Medicine. Dr. Chalkley is responsible for the overview of the Aging, National Institute of Mental Health, and National activities of the Office of Biomedical Research Education and Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Training, including oversight of the Indisciplinary Graduate David Korn, M.D. (Vice Chair) (IOM), is presently the vice Program in the Biological Sciences, the M.D./Ph.D. program, postdoctoral affairs, and graduate student affairs as well as provost for research at Harvard University, a position he minority activities and supporting training grant applications. assumed in November 2008. Prior to that he served as chief Dr. Chalkley was educated at Pembroke College, Oxford, in scientific officer of the Association of American Medical chemistry and did his postdoctoral research in gene regulation Colleges (AAMC) in Washington, D.C., from January 2008 and chromatin structure in the laboratory of James Bonner at to November 2008 and as AAMC’s senior vice president for Caltech. After almost 20 years in the biochemistry department biomedical and health sciences research from September at the University of Iowa-School of Medicine, he moved to 1997 to January 2008. Before joining AAMC, Dr. Korn Vanderbilt in 1986. He has published almost 200 papers in served as Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professor and dean chromatin research. Dr. Chalkley has had an active interest of the Stanford University School of Medicine from October in graduate education for many years and was involved in the 1984 to April 1995, and as vice president of Stanford Univer- establishment of the IGP where he served as director for the sity from January 1986 to April 1995. Before that he served past eight years. He has been a hardcore runner for 40 years as professor and chairman of the Department of Pathology at and is a (self-described) competent rock climber. Stanford, and chief of the pathology service at the Stanford University Hospital since June 1968. Dr. Korn received his William T. Greenough, Ph.D. (Vice Chair ) (NAS), is doctorate from Harvard University. He has been chairman of Swanlund Chair and Center for Advanced Study Profes- the Stanford University Committee on Research; president of sor of Psychology at the University of Illinois in Urbana- the American Association of Pathologists (now the American Champaign. His research focuses on neural mechanisms of Society for Investigative Pathology), from which he received learning and memory; neurobiology of long-term potentia- the Gold-Headed Cane Award for lifetime achievement in tion and epilepsy; mechanisms of the brain–behavioral devel- 2004; president of the Association of Pathology Chairman; a opment; neurobiology of the aging process; and plasticity of member of the board of directors and the executive commit- metabolic support components of the brain. Dr. Greenough’s tee of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental awards and honors include AAAS fellow (1985), NIMH Biology; and a member of the board of directors of the Asso- MERIT award (1989), member of the National Academy of ciation of Academic Health Centers. Dr. Korn was a founder Sciences (1992), Fragile X Foundation William Rosen Award and chairman of the board of directors of the California for Outstanding Research (1998), University of Illinois Transplant Donor Network, one of the nation’s largest organ Oakley-Kunde Award for Undergraduate Teaching (1998), procurement organizations. More recently, he was a founder and American Psychological Society William James Fellow of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Research Award (1998). He obtained his Ph.D. from the Uni- Protection Programs, a nonprofit corporation created to versity of California at Los Angeles in 1969. He brings to the enhance and standardize the protection of human participants committee his knowledge of neuropsychology and learning in medical research. He is a member of the Institute of Medi- processes, which is an important area of NIH research. He cine of the National Academy of Sciences and has served 

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 APPENDIX A on various National Academies committees, including the Nursing. She has been at Yale since January of 1993. Prior Clinical Research Roundtable. In the past decade his writings to assuming the deanship on September 1, 2005, she served and lectures have focused on issues of academic values and as associate dean for scholarly affairs. She is also director health and science policy. of the NIH-funded Center for Self and Family Management and a related pre- and postdoctoral training program. She Charles Bertolami, D.D.S., D. Med. Sc., is dean of the was the founding director of the school’s doctoral program. College of Dentistry at New York University. A leader in Previously she held progressive academic and administra- the dental research, education, and clinical communities, tive appointments at the University of Pennsylvania and he was named the 14th dean of the 142-year-old New York Columbia University. She holds a bachelor’s degree from University College of Dentistry in 2007. Dr. Bertolami the University of Pittsburgh, an M.S.N. in pediatric nursing was formerly the dean of the University of California-San from Yale University, and a doctorate in public health and Francisco (UCSF) School of Dentistry; during the 12 years social psychology from Columbia University. he served in that post, the UCSF School of Dentistry led the James Jackson, Ph.D. (IOM), is Daniel Katz Distinguished nation in overall NIH funding for dental schools. In addition to expanding the school’s research capacity, he also enhanced University Professor of Psychology at the University of the school’s clinical and teaching programs, including Michigan at Ann Arbor and director of the Institute for Social renovating clinics and laboratories; implemented a new cur- Research (ISR). Dr. Jackson’s research efforts include carry- riculum reinforcing integration of basic and clinical sciences ing out a number of national surveys and one international in dental education; established and expanded joint degree survey of black populations focusing on issues of racial programs; and established a year-long post-baccalaureate and ethnic influences on life course development; attitude program for students from economically or educationally change; reciprocity; social support; and coping and health. disadvantaged groups. Dr. Bertolami is the president-elect of He obtained his Ph.D. in social psychology from Wayne the American Dental Education Association and is a former State University. Dr. Jackson is a recognized authority on president of the American Association for Dental Research. African American life, and currently has a major grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to assess the physi- Thomas O. Daniel, M.D., is the president of Celgene cal, emotional, mental, and economic health of a nationally Research. Dr. Daniel has more than two decades of medi- representative sample of more than 4,000 Black American cal and pharmaceutical research experience, having most adults. His knowledge and understanding of issues related recently served as the chief scientific officer at Ambryx, Inc., to the underrepresentation of minority groups in biomedical, a biotechnology company focused on discovering and devel- behavioral, and clinical research will be very helpful to oping protein-based therapeutics. Prior to that, Dr. Daniel t he committee in addressing personnel needs in these was vice president of research at Amgen Inc., where he populations. served as research site head for Amgen Seattle, as inflamma- Keith Micoli, Ph.D., is the manager of the postdoctoral tion therapeutic area head, and on research and development portfolio review boards. Prior to Amgen’s acquisition of program and ethics program coordinator at New York Uni- Immunex, Dr. Daniel was senior vice president of discov- versity’s (NYU’s) School of Medicine. He earned his B.A. ery research at Immunex, where he consolidated and built from New College of Florida in 1993 and his Ph.D. from the programs in oncology and vascular biology. As president of University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in 2001, and, Celgene Global Research, he is responsible for leading the before moving to NYU in August 2008, was a postdoctoral discovery, preclinical, and early-stage clinical programs for fellow and instructor at UAB. He also held an appointment Celgene worldwide. Prior to his industrial positions he was as adjunct assistant professor at Samford University, teaching the K. M. Hakim Professor of Medicine and Cell Biology at microbiology. Keith served on the board of directors of the Vanderbilt University, and director of the Vanderbilt Center National Postdoctoral Association from 2003 to 2007 and for Vascular Biology. Dr. Daniel obtained his M.D. degree was board chairman from 2005 to 2007. from University of Texas Southwestern, trained in internal John C. Wooley, Ph.D., is associate vice chancellor for medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, completed postdoctoral work in molecular genetics at University of research at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), Texas Southwestern, was a Howard Hughes Medical Insti- an adjunct professor in pharmacology and in chemistry and tute associate at UCSF, and an NIH-funded investigator for biochemistry, and a strategic advisor and senior fellow of 20 years at Vanderbilt. His laboratory research programs the San Diego Supercomputer Center. He received his Ph.D. focused on cellular and receptor mechanisms regulating degree in 1975 at the University of Chicago, working with endothelial growth and neovascularization. Al Crewe and Robert Uretz in biological physics. Prior to his appointment at UCSD he was at the Department of Energy, Margaret Grey, Dr.Ph.P.H., R.N., F.A.A.N. (IOM), is the where he served as deputy associate director in the Office of dean and Annie Goodrich Professor at the Yale School of Science. In that capacity, he was responsible for biological

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 APPENDIX A Joan M. Lakoski, Ph.D., is the associate vice chancellor and environmental sciences and oversaw human and micro- bial genomics, biotechnology, molecular and cell biology, for academic career development and the founding and health effects of radiation and energy production, computa- executive director of the Office of Academic Career Devel- tional and structural biology, and climate change research. opment at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences, Prior to going to the Department of Energy, he was the associate dean for postdoctoral education, and professor director of the Division of Infrastructure and Resources for of pharmacology at the University of Pittsburgh School of the Biological Sciences Directorate at the National Science Medicine. Dr. Lakoski received her doctoral degree from the Foundation (NSF). For his role in advocating, establishing, University of Iowa, completed postdoctoral training in the and leading the Biological Instrumentation Facilities and the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Biological Research Centers, Dr. Wooley received NSF’s top Medicine, and has held faculty positions at the University performance award, “NSF Superior Accomplishment.” He of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and the Pennsylvania also held positions as a visiting scientist at G.D. Searle and State University College of Medicine, including interim Company in England, as an assistant professor of biochemi- chair of the Department of Pharmacology at Penn State. cal sciences at Princeton, and research associate professor She maintains an active research program investigating the of biophysics at Johns Hopkins Medical School. Dr. Wooley neuropharmacology of aging and impacts of mentoring, created the first programs within the U.S. federal government is a member of the graduate faculty at the University of for funding research in bioinformatics and in computational Pittsburgh, and participates as a reviewer for NIH Center biology, and has been involved in strengthening the interface for Scientific Review study section panels. She has been the between computing and biology for more than a decade. For recipient of an NIH Research Career Development Award, an the new UCSD California Institute for Telecommunication Independent Investigator Award from the National Alliance and Information Technology [Cal-(IT)2], Dr. Wooley directs of Research on Schizophrenia, an administrative fellowship the biology and biomedical layer or applications component, at the Pennsylvania State University, and a Committee on termed Digitally-enabled Genomic Medicine (DeGeM), a Institutional Cooperation Academic Leadership Program step in delivering personalized medicine in a wireless clini- Fellow. Currently, she serves as chair of the Ethics Advisory cal setting. His current research involves bioinformatics and Committee of the Endocrine Society, as a member of the structural genomics, while his principal objective at UCSD AAMC Group on Faculty Affairs Program Planning and is to stimulate new research initiatives for large-scale, multi- Transition Committee, as a member of the Board Develop- disciplinary challenges. He also collaborates in developing ment Committee for the National Postdoctoral Association, scientific applications of information technology and high as a member of the Postdoctorate Committee for the AAMC performance computing; creating industry–university col- Graduate Research and Education Training Group, as chair laborations; expanding applied life science opportunities, of the Committing on Teaching for the International Union notably around drug discovery; and establishing a biotech- of Pharmacology, as a AAMC women’s liaison officer for the nology and pharmacology science park on UCSD’s health University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and serves as sciences campus zone. co-director of the KL2 Clinical Research Scholars Program and director of mentoring and faculty development for the Susan Fiske, Ph.D., is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Clinical Translational Service Award at the University of Psychology at Princeton University. Dr. Fiske received her Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences. Her administra- Ph.D. from Harvard University and has an honorary doc- tive responsibilities encompass oversight and development torate from Université Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, of comprehensive career development services, including Belgium. Dr. Fiske’s research addresses how stereotyping, mentoring programs for professional students, postdoctoral prejudice, and discrimination are encouraged or discouraged fellows, residents, clinical fellows, and faculty across the by social relationships, such as cooperation, competition, health schools at the University of Pittsburgh. She remains and power. She has just finished a third edition of Social committed to creating and shaping the future of the bio- Cognition (1984, 1991, 2008, each with Taylor) on how medical research community. people make sense of each other. She has written more than Mark Pauly, Ph.D. (IOM), received a Ph.D. in economics nearly 200 articles and chapters and edited many books and journal special issues. Notably, she edits the Annual Reiew from the University of Virginia. Dr. Pauly is a former com- of Psychology (with Schacter and Sternberg) and the Hand­ missioner on the Physician Payment Review Commission book of Social Psychology (with Gilbert and Lindzey). She and an active member of the Institute of Medicine. One of also wrote a recent upper-level text, Social Beings: A Core the nation’s leading health economists, Dr. Pauly has made Moties Approach to Social Psychology (2004). She is a significant contributions to the fields of medical economics member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, past and health insurance. His classic study on the economics of president of the Association for Psychological Sciences, and moral hazard was the first to point out how health insurance 2008 winner of the William James Fellow Award. coverage may affect patients’ use of medical services. Sub- sequent work, both theoretical and empirical, has explored

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 APPENDIX A the impact of conventional insurance coverage on preven- Texas. Previously he was professor of biomedical infor- tive care, on outpatient care, and on prescription drug use matics at Arizona State University and professor of basic in managed care. He is currently studying the effect of poor medical sciences and professor of medicine at the University health on worker productivity. In addition, he has explored of Arizona College of Medicine. Until May 2008 he served as the influences that determine whether insurance coverage the founding dean of the Phoenix campus of the University is available and, through several cost-effectiveness studies, of Arizona’s College of Medicine. Before that he was the the influence of medical care and health practices on health Rolf A. Scholdager Professor and chair of the Department of outcomes and cost. His interests in health policy deal with Biomedical Informatics at Columbia College of Physicians ways to reduce the number of uninsured people through tax and Surgeons in New York City (2000-2007) and professor credits for public and private insurance, and appropriate of medicine and of computer science at Stanford University design for Medicare in a budget-constrained environment. (1979-2000). After receiving an A.B. in applied mathematics Dr. Pauly is a co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal from Harvard College in 1970, he moved to Stanford Uni- of Health Care Finance and Economics and an associate versity where he was awarded a Ph.D. in medical informa- editor of the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty. He has served tion sciences in 1975 and an M.D. in 1976. During the early on Institute of Medicine panels on public accountability for 1970s, he was principal developer of the medical expert health insurers under Medicare and on improving the supply system known as MYCIN. After a pause for internal medi- of vaccines. cine house-staff training at Massachusetts General Hospital and Stanford Hospital between 1976 and 1979, he joined the Larry J. Shapiro, M.D. ( IOM), is the executive vice Stanford internal medicine faculty where he served as chief chancellor for medical affairs at Washington University of general internal medicine, associate chair of medicine for in St. Louis and dean of the school of medicine. Prior to primary care, and director of an active research program in his current position he was the W.H. and Marie Wattis clinical information systems and decision support. He spear- Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of headed the formation of a Stanford graduate degree program Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco in biomedical informatics and divided his time between (UCSF), School of Medicine and has been the chief of clinical medicine and biomedical informatics research. He pediatric services at UCSF Children’s Hospital since 1991. continues to be closely involved with medical education and Dr. Shapiro is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the biomedical informatics graduate training. His research inter- American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a fellow of ests include the broad range of issues related to integrated the American Association for the Advancement of Science. decision-support systems, their effective implementation, Dr. Shapiro is a member of many professional societies and and the role of the Internet in health care. Dr. Shortliffe is organizations and has served as the president of the American a member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Soci- Society of Human Genetics, the American Board of Medi- ety for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American cal Genetics, the Society for Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Physicians, and the American Clinical and Climatological the Western Society for Pediatric Research, the Society for Association. He has also been elected to fellowship in the Pediatric Research, and the American Pediatric Society. He American College of Medical Informatics and the American is currently the chairman of the board of the Association of Association for Artificial Intelligence. He is a master of the Academic Health Centers. Dr. Shapiro earned both under- American College of Physicians and was a member of that graduate and medical degrees from Washington University organization’s board of regents from 1996-2002. He is in St. Louis. After completing his residency at St. Louis editor-in-chief of the Journal of Biomedical Informatics and Children’s Hospital in 1973, he became a research associate serves on the editorial boards for several other biomedical at the National Institute of Arthritis, Metabolism and Diges - informatics publications. He has served on the Computer tive Diseases, Section on Human Biochemical Genetics. In Science and Telecommunications Board (National Research 1975, he joined the faculty at the University of California, Council) and the Biomedical Library Review Committee Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine as an assistant (National Library of Medicine) and was the recipient of a professor of pediatrics and director of the Harbor-UCLA research career development award from the latter agency. Genetic Metabolic Laboratory. Eight years later, Dr. Shapiro In addition, he received the Grace Murray Hopper Award of was named professor of pediatrics and biological chemistry, the Association for Computing Machinery in 1976 and the and in 1986 he became chief of the Division of Medical Morris F. Collen Award of the American College of Medical Genetics. While at UCLA, he was a Howard Hughes Medical Informatics in 2006 and has been a Henry J. Kaiser Family Institute investigator. Foundation Faculty Scholar in general internal medicine. Edward H. Shortliffe is president and chief executive offi- Donald Steinwachs, Ph.D. (IOM), is professor in the Health cer of the American Medical Informatics Association. He is Policy and Management Department at Johns Hopkins also professor in the School of Biomedical Informatics at University. He is also the director of the Health Services the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Research and Development Center there. Dr. Steinwachs

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 APPENDIX A received his Ph.D. in 1973 from Johns Hopkins University. Health Sciences Policy of the Institute of Medicine, National Dr. Steinwach’s current research seeks to identify opportuni - Academy of Sciences from 1993-1997. From 1981 to 1993 ties to improve quality of health care and patient outcomes she held increasingly responsible positions at the National and when feasible, evaluate promising quality improve- Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human ment interventions. Previous research includes studies of Services, spanning biomedical research, research program medical effectiveness and patient outcomes for individuals administration, policy analysis, and policy development. with specific medical (e.g., asthma), surgical (e.g., cataract Dr. Wilson’s expertise is in policy analysis, biomedical surgery), and psychiatric (e.g., schizophrenia) conditions. A and environmental ethics, university administration, and current study is evaluating an intervention with schizophre- workforce development. Dr. Wilson holds a B.S. degree in nia patients using a Web-based tool for patients to compare chemistry/pre-med from Xavier University of Louisiana and their care to evidence-based standards and empower them to a Ph.D. in molecular biology from Johns Hopkins University, discuss quality with their therapist. where she was supported by an NIH training grant and sub- sequently a Ford Foundation predoctoral fellow. Valerie Petit Wilson is associate dean of the graduate Allan Yates, M.D., Ph.D., is an emeritus professor in the school for recruitment and professional development (since 2005) and clinical professor of community health at Brown Department of Pathology and a previous director of the University. She is also executive director of the Leadership Medical Scientist Program at Ohio State University. Dr. Yates Alliance, a consortium of 33 leading teaching and research was also the previous vice-chair for research and graduate institutions dedicated to preparing underrepresented students education in the Department of Pathology. The Medical Sci- for careers in academia, government, and private sectors entist Program at Ohio State, which leads to both the M.D. through research and clinical doctoral training. In these roles and Ph.D. degrees, has a unique, integrated curriculum that Dr. Wilson is the principal investigator of numerous federal draws on the nationally recognized educational and scien- and private grants that enhance and support the development tific strengths of Ohio State University. Dr. Yates’ research of undergraduate research scholars and promotes the devel- involves investigating the role of glycolipids in the biology opment of a network of more than 2,000 Leadership Alli- of human brain tumors. This includes glycolipid analyses, ance alumni and doctoral scholars, She is also co-principal transfection of genes encoding enzymes that synthesize investigator for projects related to Brown’s participation glycolipids, and examining the biological effects of altered in the Ph.D. Completion Project. Prior to beginning these glycolipid compositions of brain tumors both in cell culture appointments at Brown University, she was deputy director and animal models. Dr. Yates was a fellow of the American of the Center for Bioenvironmental Research and clinical College of Pathologists in 1991 and AAAS fellow in 2003. professor of Environmental Health at Tulane University (Deceased August 2010) from 1998-2003. She previously directed the Division of

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